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Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise (2018)

Chapter: Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

APPENDIX A

Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS1

FROM NOAA


TABLE A.1 Examples of Social Science–Related Research Funded by the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research-Office of Weather and Air Quality (OWAQ)

Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
2016 Awards
Contract Advancing Social and Behavioral Science Research and Application within the Weather Enterprise National Academy of Sciences
NSF Supplemental Award Supplement to NSF award “Collaborative Research: Online Hazard Communication in the Terse Regime” Jeannette Sutton, University of Kentucky
Carter Butts, UC-Irvine
NSF Supplemental Award Supplement to NSF award “Improving Public Response to Weather Warnings” Susan Joslyn, University of Washington
NSF Supplemental Award Supplement to NSF award “Next Generation, Resilient Warning Systems for Tornadoes and Flash Floods” Brenda Philips, University of Massachusetts
Joseph Trainor, University of Delaware
VORTEX-Southeast Improving Risk Communication and Reducing Vulnerabilities for Dynamic Tornado Threats in the Southeastern U.S. Julie Demuth, National Center for Atmospheric Research Keith Anderson, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory
VORTEX-Southeast Lay Judgments of Environmental Cues That Signal a Tornado Stephen Broomell and Gabrielle Wong-Parodi, University of Pennsylvania

1 NOAA = National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; NSF = National Science Foundation; DHS = Department of Homeland Security.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
VORTEX-Southeast Collaborative Research: Understanding How Uncertainty in Severe Weather Information Affects Decisions (Part 2) Daphne LaDue, Jack Friedman, and Laura Myers, University of Oklahoma
VORTEX-Southeast Convective mode and Tennessee tornadoes: Climatology, warning procedures, and false alarm rates Kelsey Ellis and Lisa Mason, University of Tennessee
2015 Awards
VORTEX-Southeast Tornado Warning Response in the Southeast: Advancing Knowledge for Action in Tennessee Kelsey Ellis and Lisa Mason, University of Tennessee
VORTEX-Southeast Multi-disciplinary Investigation of Concurrent Tornadoes and Flash Floods in the Southeastern U.S. Russ Schumacher, Colorado State
VORTEX-Southeast Complacency and False Alarms in Tornado Affected Communities Michael Egnoto, University of Maryland
VORTEX-Southeast Collaborative Research: Understanding How Uncertainty in Severe Weather Information Affects Decisions (Part 1) Daphne LaDue, Jack Friedman, and Laura Myers, University of Oklahoma
2014 Awards
Cooperative Agreement Workshop: Life and Death Decisions: An Integrative Approach to Understanding and Mitigating the Impacts of Extreme Weather Lans Rothfusz, National Severe Storms Laboratory
Open competition - R2O Refinement and Evaluation of Automated High-Resolution Ensemble-Based Hazard Detection Guidance Tools for Transition to NWS Operations Stan Benjamin, NOAA Global Systems Division
Open competition - R2O Probability of What? Understanding and Conveying Uncertainty Through Probabilistic Hazard Services Tracy Hansen, NOAA Global Systems Division, National Severe Storms Laboratory
HWT Comparing Subjective and Objective Evaluation of Forecasts for Severe Thunderstorms Harold Brooks, National Severe Storms Laboratory
HWT Testing and Evaluation of Experimental Probabilistic Hazard Information with Decision Makers Chris Karstens, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
2012 Awards
Open competition - SSWR The Impact of Uncertainty Information on Tornado Warning Response: Developing Recommendations for Warning Best Practices Kim Klockow and Renee McPherson, University of Oklahoma
Open competition - SSWR Flood Risk and Uncertainty: Assessing the National Weather Service’s Forecast and Warning Tools Rachel Hogan Carr, Nurture Nature Center
Open competition - SSWR Social and Behavioral Influences on Weather-Driven Decisions Ken Galluppi and Burrell Montz, Arizona State
Open competition - SSWR Utilization of Real-Time Social Media Data in Severe Weather Events: A Proposal to Evaluate the Prospects of Social Media Data Use for Severe Weather Forecasting, Communication, and Post-Event Assessments Carol Silva, University of Oklahoma
MRMS The Phased Array Radar Innovative Sensing Experiment (PARISE) Pam Heinselman, National Severe Storms Laboratory
2006-2012 Awards
Cooperative Agreement Societal Impacts Program Jeff Lazo, National Center for Atmospheric Research
Cooperative Agreement Integrated Solutions: Environment and Health Series Bill Hooke, American Meteorological Society
Cooperative Agreement Social Science Woven Into Meteorology Eve Gruntfest, National Severe Storms Laboratory/Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies
MRMS Impact of High-temporal Resolution PAR Data on Warning Decision Making Pam Heinselman, National Severe Storms Laboratory

NOTE: HWT = Hazardous Weather Testbed; MRMS = Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor; NSF = National Science Foundation; NWS = National Weather Service; PAR = phased array radar; PI = Principal Investigator; R2O = Research to Operations; SSWR = Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

TABLE A.2 Examples of Social Science–Related Research Funded by the National Weather Service (NWS)

Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
2016 Awards
BPA Social and Economic Effects of Severe Weather Storms: NYC Case Study Jeff Lazo, Abt Associates
BPA Cost Modification: Social and Economic Effects of Severe Weather Storms: NYC Case Study Jeff Lazo, Abt Associates
BPA Social and Economic Effects of Space Weather Matthew Ranson, Daniel Baker, and Kevin Forbes, Abt Associates
BPA Rip Current Visualization Burrell Montz, East Carolina University
BPA Support for NWS Phaze IV Hazard Simplification Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Identifying Key Partners/Users of Weather Prediction Center Products & Mapping Related User Decision-Making Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Communicating Probabilistic Information for Decision Makers: A Case Study Using Experimental Snow Forecast Products Gina Eosco and Susan Joslyn, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Stakeholder Engagement to Validate Water Resources Information and Services Needs and Gather Feedback on NOAA’s NWS Initial Water Resources Services Capability Arleen O’Donnell, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Social Science Evaluation of National Water Center Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast Service and National Water Model Output and Technical Support Services Arleen O’Donnell, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Assessing Fire Weather Services From the Public Perspective Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Cost Modification: Support for Effective Communication of SPC Day 1 Outlook with Increased Temporal and Spatial Resolution Rebecca Morss, Abt Associates
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
BPA Cost Modification: Support for Haz Simp III Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
CSTAR Major Risks, Uncertain Outcomes: Making Ensemble Forecasts Work for Multiple Audiences Burrell Montz, East Carolina University
Rachel Hogan Carr, Nurture Nature Center
Cooperative Institute - NGI National Weather Service Social Science Curriculum Delivery FY17 Laura Myers, NGI
Cooperative Institute - NGI NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards Network Transformational Change Stakeholder Engagement Phase One Laura Myers, NGI
Cooperative Institute - NGI NOAA Weather Information and Dissemination All Hazards Stakeholder Needs Assessment Verification Project (Phase Two) Laura Myers, NGI
Cooperative Institute - CICS Identifying Users, Diagnosing Understandability Challenges, and Developing Prototype Solutions for NOAA Climate Prediction Center’s Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks Michael Gerst, Melissa Kenney, and Allison Baer, CICS
Contract Continuous surveys to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
Contract Advancing Social and Behavioral Science Research and Application within the Weather Enterprise National Academy of Sciences
2015 Awards
IDIQ Cost Modification: Support for Phase 2 Hazard Simplification Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Support for NWS Impact Based Warnings Joe Ripberger, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Support for NWS Hurricane Local Impact Local Statement/Tropical Cyclone Valid Time Event Code and Hurricane Threat and Impacts Graphics Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
BPA Support for NWS Phase 3 Hazard Simplification Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
BPA Support for Effective Communication of SPC Day 1 Outlook with Increased Temporal and Spatial Resolution Rebecca Morss, Abt Associates
Cooperative Institute - NGI Certificate Program Curriculum Development in Social Science Applications for Meteorologists Laura Myers, NGI
Contract Continuous surveys to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2014 Awards
IDIQ Weather Ready Nation Societal Outcome Performance Measures Lou Nadeau, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
IDIQ Onset of Tropical Storm Force Winds Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
IDIQ Support for Phase 2 Hazard Simplification Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
IDIQ Surge and Inundation Social Science Research (Extratropical and Assessment of Potential Storm Surge Graphic) Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Contract Annual survey to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2013 Awards
IDIQ Stakeholder Engagement to Document Information and Service Needs and Demonstrate Integrated Water Resources Science and Services for River Basin Commissions Arleen O’Donnell, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
IDIQ Support for the National Weather Service Hurricane Local Statement and Hazard Simplification Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
IDIQ Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program SocioEconomic Research and Recommendations Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Contract Annual survey to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2012 Awards
IDIQ Stakeholder Engagement to Demonstrate Integrated Water Resources Science and Services for River Basin Commissions in the Mid-Atlantic Arleen O’Donnell, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Open competition - SSWR The Impact of Uncertainty Information on Tornado Warning Response: Developing Recommendations for Warning Best Practices Kim Klockow and Renee McPherson, University of Oklahoma
Open competition - SSWR Social and Behavioral Influences on Weather-Driven Decisions Ken Galluppi and Burrell Montz, Arizona State
Contract Annual survey to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2011 Awards
IDIQ Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program SocioEconomic Research and Recommendations Storm Surge Research Project Betty Morrow, Eastern Research Group, Inc.
Report on Tsunami Warning Center Warning Products Proposed and Existing Guidelines for Recognition in the NWS TsunamiReady® Community Program Eastern Tennessee State University
Contract Annual survey to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2010 Awards
Prototypes of Weather Information Impacts on Emergency Management Burrell Montz, RENCI
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Funding/Project Type Project Title Lead Project PI(s), Institution(s)
Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project & Economic Valation Daniel Sutter
Assessing the Value of Climate Information in Agriculture Using a Stochastic Production Frontier David Letson, University of Miami
Contract Annual survey to measure customer satisfaction of NWS services based on ACSI Douglas Young and Salvatore Romano, CFI Group
2009 Awards
Forecast-At-A-Glance Webpage Project Julie Demuth, National Center for Atmospheric Research - The Societal Impacts Program
2008 Awards
Improving the Display of River and Flash Flood Predictions Aptima
2004 Awards
Evaluation of NWS Flood Severity Categories and Use of Gage Station Flood History Information David Ford, David Ford Consulting Engineers, Inc.
Probability Focus Groups Sheri Teodoru, CFI Group

NOTE: ACSI = American Customer Satisfaction Index; BPA = Blanket Purchase Agreement; CICS = Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites; CSTAR = Collaborative Science Technology, and Applied Research Program; IDIQ = Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity; NGI = Northern Gulf Institute; PI = Principal Investigator; SPC = Storm Prediction Center; SSWR = Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

FROM NSF

TABLE A.3 Examples of Weather-Related Research Funded by the NSF Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE)

Program Project Title Lead Project PI(s) NSF Award #
SEES Fellows, SEES Hazards Hazards SEES Type 2: Modeling to Promote Regional Resilience to Repeated Heat Waves and Hurricanes Seth Guikema 1331399
Decision Risk and Management Sci Distinguishing Two Dimensions of Subjective Uncertainty Craig Fox 1427469
Decision Risk and Management Sci Collaborative Research: Multi-scale Modeling of Public Perceptions of Heat Wave Risk Peter Howe, Jennifer Marlon 1459903
1459872
Sociology Collaborative Research: Community Reactions to Extreme Weather Events Hilary Boudet, Doug McAdam 1357055
1357068
Geography and Spatial Sciences Doctoral Dissertation Research: Weather Risk, Climate Adaptation and Farmer Decision Making in the Southwestern United States Matthew Turner 1459175
Economics CAREER: Economic Theory, Testing of Theories Wojciech Olszewski 644930
Perception, Action, and Cognition CAREER: Flexible Resource Allocation and Efficient Coding in Human Vision George Alvarez 953730

NOTE: CAREER = Faculty Early Career Development Program; SEES = Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

TABLE A.4 Examples of Weather-Related Research with a Social or Behavioral Science Component Funded by the NSF Directorate for Engineering (ENG)

Program Project Title Lead Project PI(s) NSF Award #
SEES Hazards, Infrastructure Management and Extreme Events Hazards SEES: Bridging Information, Uncertainty, and Decision-Making in Hurricanes Using an Interdisciplinary Perspective Satish Ukkusuri 1520338
Infrastructure Management and Extreme Events Structures of Long-Term Disaster Recovery: Organizational Roles and Collaboration in Six Cities Michelle Meyer 1434957
Infrastructure Management and Extreme Events Collaborative Research: An Integrated Approach to Measuring Dynamic Economic Resilience Following Disasters Adam Rose, Kathleen Tierney 1363437, 1363409
Infrastructure Management and Extreme Events RAPID: Network Improvisation in Emergency Response: An Application to Debris Removal Operations David Mendonca 1313589
Special Studies and Analyses RAPID: Post-Disaster Risk Redefinition in Small New Jersey Municipalities During the Initial Recovery Period following Super Storm Sandy James Mitchell 1324792

NOTE: RAPID = Rapid Response Research; SEES = Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

TABLE A.5 Total Funding for National Science Foundation–Funded Weather-Related Projects Active in 2016 Related to Concepts Such as Perception, Behavior, Communication, Decision Making, or Action

National Science Foundation (NSF) Weather-Related Awards That Include SBS Research
Estimated Total Funding by Directorate (for projects active in 2016) Example Project Supported by This Directorate Lead Project PI(s) NSF Award #
CSE $4.3 million CGV: Large: Collaborative Research: Modeling, Display, and Understanding Uncertainty in Simulations for Policy Decision Making Donald House
Mary Hegarty
Michael Lindell
Ross Whitaker
1212501
1212577
1540469
1212806
EHR $3 million NRT: Coastal Climate Risk and Resilience (C2R2) Robert Kopp III 1633557
ENG $17.7 million CRISP Type 2/Collaborative Research: Critical Transitions in the Resilience and Recovery of Interdependent Social and Physical Networks Laura Siebeneck 1638317
GEO $11.2 million Hazard SEES: An Integrated Approach to Risk Assessment and Management in Responding to Land Falling Hurricanes in a Changing Climate Ning Lin 1520683
SBE $16.4 million Urban Resilience to Extreme Weather Related Events Charles Redman 1444755
Total $52,704,970

NOTES: The list is in order of the directorate managing the project; funding may be contributed by other directorates or agencies. Also shown is one relevant example of current NSF awards (active as of end of 2016) from each directorate; the award amounts for these individual examples are not provided here but are available through the public NSF web-based award search. Results were screened by hand to restrict to those with an SBS element.

CGV = Computer Graphics and Visualization; CRISP = Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes; CSE = Directorate For Computer and Information Science and Engineering; EHR = Directorate For Education and Human Resources; ENG = Directorate For Engineering; GEO = Directorate For Geosciences; SBE = Directorate For Social, Behavioral and Economic Science; SEES = Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

FROM DHS

Some examples of research projects relevant to SBS-weather concerns being supported through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) current Centers of Excellence are presented below.

TABLE A.6 Examples of Weather-Related Research with a Social or Behavioral Science Component Funded by the Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence (CRC), Led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lead Project PI Institution Project Title
Larry Atkinson Old Dominion University A Tool to Measure Community Stress to Support Disaster Resilience Planning
James Prochaska University of Rhode Island Communicating Risk to Motivate Individual Action
James Opaluch University of Rhode Island Overcoming Barriers to Motivate Community Action to Enhance Resilience
Isaac Ginis University of Rhode Island Modeling the Combined Coastal and Inland Hazards from High-Impact Hypothetical Hurricanes
Rachel Davidson University of Delaware An Interdisciplinary Approach to Household Strengthening and Insurance Decision

SOURCE: Homeland Security University Programs Network. (2017). Coastal Resilience Center. Retrieved May 16, 2017, from https://www.hsuniversityprograms.org/centers/crc-coastal-resilience.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

TABLE A.7 Examples of Weather-Related Research with a Social or Behavioral Science Component Funded by the National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE), Led by the University of Southern California

Lead Project PI Institution Project Title
David Weiss California State University-Los Angeles Analyzing Project Behavioral and Emotional Responses to Terrorism Events
Richard Zeckhauser John F. Kennedy School of Government Communicating Probability in Intelligence Analysis and Homeland Security
John Richard University of Southern California Dynamics of Public Fears, Beliefs, and Avoidance Behavior
William Burns University of Southern California Examining the Potential of Using Twitter Data to Study Public Response to Terrorist Threats
Robin Dillon-Merrill Georgetown University Including Perceptions of Near-Miss Events and Terrorist Risk Factors in Risk Communication
Timothy Sellnow North Dakota State University Inoculation Strategies for Risk Communication Messaging
William Burns University of Southern California Modeling the Dynamics of Risk Perception and Fear: Examining Amplifying Mechanisms and Their Consequences

SOURCE: Homeland Security University Programs Network. (2017) Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events. Retrieved May 16, 2017, from https://www.hsuniversityprograms.org/centers/create-risk-economic-analysis.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

TABLE A.8 Examples of Weather-Related Research with a Social or Behavioral Science Component Funded by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), Led by the University of Maryland

Lead Project PI Institution Project Title
Monica Schoch-Spana University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Best Practices for Preparing Communities: Citizen Engagement in Public Health Planning
Kathleen Tierney University of Colorado Community Field Studies and Analyses of Cross-Sector Preparedness Networks
Dennis Mileti University of Colorado Modeling and Simulation of Public Response to Threat and Attacks
Linda Bourque University of California - Los Angeles National Household Survey on Preparedness
Delbert Elliott University of Colorado School-Based Preparedness and Intervention Programs
Elaine Vaughan University of California - Irvine Risk Perception in Different Populations

SOURCE: Homeland Security University Programs Network. (2017). Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. Retrieved May 16, 2017, from https://www.hsuniversityprograms.org/centers/start-terrorism-studies.

TABLE A.9 Examples of Weather-Related Research with a Social or Behavioral Science Component Funded by the Critical Infrastructure Resilience Institute (CIRI), Led by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Lead Project PI Institution Project Title
Eric Salathe University of Washington Changing flood risk - Extreme precipitation, sea level rise, and inundation
Himanshu Grover University of Washington Scenario-based Flood Risk Mapping
Adam Rose University of Southern California Measuring Business and Economic Resilience in Disasters
Stephen Flynn Northeastern University Resilience Governance

SOURCE: Homeland Security University Programs Network. (2017). Critical Infrastructure Resilience Institute. Retrieved May 16, 2017, from https://www.hsuniversityprograms.org/centers/ciri-critical-infrastructure-resilience.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Examples of Funding for Social and Behavioral Science Activities by NOAA, NSF, DHS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
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Our ability to observe and forecast severe weather events has improved markedly over the past few decades. Forecasts of snow and ice storms, hurricanes and storm surge, extreme heat, and other severe weather events are made with greater accuracy, geographic specificity, and lead time to allow people and communities to take appropriate protective measures. Yet hazardous weather continues to cause loss of life and result in other preventable social costs.

There is growing recognition that a host of social and behavioral factors affect how we prepare for, observe, predict, respond to, and are impacted by weather hazards. For example, an individual’s response to a severe weather event may depend on their understanding of the forecast, prior experience with severe weather, concerns about their other family members or property, their capacity to take the recommended protective actions, and numerous other factors. Indeed, it is these factors that can determine whether or not a potential hazard becomes an actual disaster. Thus, it is essential to bring to bear expertise in the social and behavioral sciences (SBS)—including disciplines such as anthropology, communication, demography, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology—to understand how people’s knowledge, experiences, perceptions, and attitudes shape their responses to weather risks and to understand how human cognitive and social dynamics affect the forecast process itself.

Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise explores and provides guidance on the challenges of integrating social and behavioral sciences within the weather enterprise. It assesses current SBS activities, describes the potential value of improved integration of SBS and barriers that impede this integration, develops a research agenda, and identifies infrastructural and institutional arrangements for successfully pursuing SBS-weather research and the transfer of relevant findings to operational settings.

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