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Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise (2018)

Chapter: Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
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APPENDIX C

People Who Provided Input to the Committee

Meeting 1: Washington, DC | July 27-28, 2016

Roemer Alfelor, Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

John Cortinas, Kim Klockow, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Gina Eosco, NOAA, formerly Eastern Research Group, Inc.

Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University

William Gail, Global Weather Corporation

Michael Hand, White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team/GSA

Patrick Harr, National Science Foundation (NSF), Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences

Robert O’Connor, NSF, Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences

Jennifer Sprague, NOAA, National Weather Service

Meeting 2: Boulder, CO | October 6-7, 2016

Mike Chard, Boulder Emergency Management

Bob Glancy, National Weather Service

Dave Gochis, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Eve Gruntfest, Resilient Communities Research Institute, Cal Poly

Greg Guibert, Boulder’s Chief Resilience Officer

Jeff Lazo, NCAR

Heather Lazrus, NCAR

Mike Lewis, Colorado Department of Transportation

Kelly Mahoney, NOAA

Rebecca Morss, NCAR

Leysia Palen, Colorado University Boulder

Liesel Ritchie, Colorado University Boulder

Russ Schumacher, Colorado State University

Kate Starbird, University of Washington, Seattle

Deb Thomas, Colorado University Denver

Kathleen Tierney, Colorado University, Boulder

Olga Wilhelmi, NCAR

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

Meeting 3: Workshop: Washington, DC | December 1, 2016

Chris Albrecht, Narwhal Group

Greg Carbin, National Weather Service (NWS), Forecast Operations Branch

Dave Call, Ball State University

Phaedra Daipha, Rutgers University

Mike Egnoto, University of Maryland

Gina Eosco, Eastern Research Group, Inc.

Irina Feygina, Climate Central

Eve Gruntfest, Resilient Communities Research Institute, Cal Poly

Sandra Hawthorn, Office of Personnel Management, Emergency Management, Facilities, and Security

Jen Henderson, Virginia Tech

Michael Hinson, Howard County Emergency Management

Eli Jacks, NWS, Forecast Services Division

Nathan S. Johnson, WRAL-TV North Carolina

Brooke Liu, University of Maryland

Keri Lubell, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response

Steve Lund, Minnesota Department of Transportation

Edward Maibach, George Mason University

Barry Myers, Accuweather

Brenda Philips, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Krista Rouse, The Weather Channel

Bob Ryan, Broadcast and Consulting Meteorology (retired)

Jason Samenow, The Washington Post

Kenneth Wall, Federal Emergency Management Agency National Capital Region

Steven Zubrick, LWX Weather Forecast Office

Meeting 4: Seattle, WA | January 19-20, 2017

Vankita Brown, National Weather Service

Kirby Cook, National Weather Service

Susan Joslyn, University of Washington, Seattle

Michael Lindell, University of Washington, Seattle

Laura Myers, The University of Alabama

Others who provided input through written comments or direct discussions:

Theresa Armstead, Mary Neumann, Gene Shelley, CDC

Bob Baron, Critical Weather Intelligence

William Callahan and Mark Hoekzema, Earth Networks

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

Jodi Duckhorn, Lee Zwanziger, Food and Drug Administration

Bill Elwood, National Institutes of Health

Jim Gandy, WLTX, Columbia, SC

Dave Hennen, CNN Weather

Richard Jeffries, University Cooperation for Atmospheric Research COMET

J.T. Johnson, Weather Decision Technologies, Inc.

Doug Kammerer, NBCUniversal. Washington, DC

Kevin Keeshan, NBC Owned Television Stations

Michael Kraus, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL)

Arlene Laing, NOAA/ESRL

Brandon Miller, CNN Weather

Melissa Petty, NOAA/ESRL

Ryan Phillips, NBC Universal, WTVJ

Jay Prater, KAKE, Wichita, KS

John Rabin, Katherine Fox, FEMA/National Preparedness

Chris Samsury, The Weather Channel

James Spann, Alabama Weather Blog

Jeffrey Tongue, NWS, New York Weather Forecast Office

Jay Trobec, KELO-TV, Sioux Falls, SD

Steve Weagle, WPTV, West Palm Beach, FL

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Page 167
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Page 168
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Page 169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: People Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24865.
×
Page 170
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Our ability to observe and forecast severe weather events has improved markedly over the past few decades. Forecasts of snow and ice storms, hurricanes and storm surge, extreme heat, and other severe weather events are made with greater accuracy, geographic specificity, and lead time to allow people and communities to take appropriate protective measures. Yet hazardous weather continues to cause loss of life and result in other preventable social costs.

There is growing recognition that a host of social and behavioral factors affect how we prepare for, observe, predict, respond to, and are impacted by weather hazards. For example, an individual’s response to a severe weather event may depend on their understanding of the forecast, prior experience with severe weather, concerns about their other family members or property, their capacity to take the recommended protective actions, and numerous other factors. Indeed, it is these factors that can determine whether or not a potential hazard becomes an actual disaster. Thus, it is essential to bring to bear expertise in the social and behavioral sciences (SBS)—including disciplines such as anthropology, communication, demography, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology—to understand how people’s knowledge, experiences, perceptions, and attitudes shape their responses to weather risks and to understand how human cognitive and social dynamics affect the forecast process itself.

Integrating Social and Behavioral Sciences Within the Weather Enterprise explores and provides guidance on the challenges of integrating social and behavioral sciences within the weather enterprise. It assesses current SBS activities, describes the potential value of improved integration of SBS and barriers that impede this integration, develops a research agenda, and identifies infrastructural and institutional arrangements for successfully pursuing SBS-weather research and the transfer of relevant findings to operational settings.

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