National Academies Press: OpenBook

Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education (2017)

Chapter: Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24943.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24943.
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Page 192
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24943.
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Page 193
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24943.
×
Page 194
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24943.
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Page 195

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PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff MARK B. ROSENBERG (Chair) is the president of Florida International University (FIU), where he has overseen an expansion of FIU’s investments in STEM education, including partnerships with local schools, community colleges, and community organizations. Previously, he served as chancellor for the board of governors of the State University System (SUS) of Florida. As chancellor, he led the system’s strategic development and financial planning and policy initiatives, working closely with the governor and legislature. Prior to this position, he served as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at FIU. As a political scientist, he specializes in Latin America. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, chair of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, and has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development. He has a B.A. in political science from Miami University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh. HEATHER BELMONT is dean of the School of Science at Miami Dade College (MDC), where she has also served as a faculty member, chair of the Biology, Health/Wellness, and Funeral Services Departments, and director of the Biotechnology Program. At the School of Science, she has established an intrusive, in-house science advisement system, an extensive peer- led, team-learning network, and an undergraduate research program several of MDC's campuses. Previously, whe worked for Sunol Molecular Corporation and Altor Bioscience Corporation, where she conducted research on therapeutic anti-viral and anti-cancer biologics. She serves on multiple boards and is a leadership fellow of Partnership for Undergraduate Life Science Education (PULSE). She has a B.A. from Ithaca College and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Miami. CHARLES BLAICH is the director of the Center of Inquiry and the Higher Education Data Sharing Consortium (HEDS) at Wabash College. He collaborated with researchers at other universities to design and implement the Wabash national study of liberal arts education, which has involved 49 colleges and universities as participants in the longitudinal research project on the practices and conditions that support student learning. In his academic research on the auditory communication in zebra finches, undergraduate students were his collaborators as well as coauthors on all of his papers and conference presentations. He serves on an advisory panel for a project in the California State University system to enhance access to STEM education for underrepresented minorities. He has received teaching awards from the University of Connecticut, Eastern Illinois University, and Wabash College. He has a B.S. in psychology, an M.A. in experimental psychology, and a Ph.D. in developmental psychology, all from the University of Connecticut. MARK CONNOLLY is an associate research scientist with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has served as principal investigator for two 5-year studies of postsecondary STEM education, and he is a member of the research and evaluation team for the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning . He also serves as an evaluator-researcher on STEM faculty development studies funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the National Insitutes of Health, and AppD-1

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS the Howard Hughes Medical Insitute. His areas of study include postsecondary teaching and learning, graduate education, academic careers, and STEM education reform. He has a Ph.D. in higher education from Indiana University at Bloomington. KENNE DIBNER (Deputy Study Director) is a program officer with the Board on Science Education of the National Academies, where she currently directs a study of citizen science and previously directed a study of science literacy. Prior to joining the National Academies, Kenne worked as a research associate at Policy Studies Associates, Inc., where she conducted evaluations of education policies and programs for government agencies, foundations, and school districts. She also previously worked as a research consultant with the Center on Education Policy. She has a B.A. in English literature from Skidmore College and a Ph.D. in education policy from Michigan State University. STEPHEN DIRECTOR (NAE) is provost University Distinguished Professor emeritus at Northeastern University. He previously served as senior vice president for academic affairs and senior advisor to the president. He also held a number of academic positions at Drexel University, the University of Michigan, the University of Florida, and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). He has received numerous awards for his research and educational contributions, including the ASEE Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, the IEEE Millennium Medal, the IEEE Education Medal and the Aristotle Award from the Semiconductor Research Corporation. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineeering. He has a B.S. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. KEVIN EAGAN is assistant professor in residence in the Department of Education and managing director of the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). As managing director, he coordinates HERI's funded research projects and oversees the development, administration, and analysis of the five national surveys. He also serves as director of the Cooperative Institutional Research Program, the longest-running and largest empirical study of higher education in the country. His research interests include issues related to undergraduate STEM education; contingent faculty; student retention; institutional contexts and structures of opportunity; survey validity and reliability; and advanced quantitative methods. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Greensboro College, an M.S. in higher education administration from North Carolina State University, and a Ph.D. in higher education and organizational change from UCLA. SUSAN ELROD is provost and executive vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (UW-W). At UW-W, she has led the development of the new university strategic plan, which includes a new strategic enrollment management plan and academic plan. Prior to her appointment at UW-W, she served as interim provost and vice president for Academic Affairs and California State University, Chico. She went to Chico after serving as dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at California State University, Fresno. She previously served as executive director of Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) in Washington, DC. During her tenure at PKAL, she led several multi-campus, national STEM education reform initiatives that AppD-2

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS focused on interdisciplinary learning, sustainability, and STEM student transfer success. She continues to serve as a senior scholar at AAC&U and as an advisor for or an investigator on several state and national projects STEM education projects. She has a B.S. in biological science from California State University at Chico and a Ph.D. in genetics from the University of California, Davis. STUART FELDMAN leads Schmidt Sciences at Schmidt Philanthropies, a foundation focusing on science, energy, and sustainability of the biosphere. Previously, he was vice president of engineering at Google and held several positions at IBM, including vice president for computer science in research, vice president for internet technology, and director of IBM’sInstitute for Advanced Commerce. He is a former president of the Association for Computing Machinery, as well as a member of the board of directors of the Association Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. He is a fellow of several professional associations including the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he received an honorary doctor of mathematics from the University of Waterloo. CHARLES HENDERSON is a professor of physics and of the Mallinson Institute for Science Education at Western Michigan University, where he is also codirector of the Center for Research on Instructional Change in Postsecondary Education. Previously, he was a high school physics and chemistry teacher at the International School of Minnesota and taught physics at Macalester College and at Anoka- Ramsey Community College. His current research studies the teaching and learning of physics with a focus on the development of theories and strategies for promoting change in the teaching of STEM subjects. He has served as president of the Michigan section of the American Association of Physics Teachers, chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers Committee on Research in Physics Education, and a member of the Physics Content Advisory Committee for the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification. He has a B.A. in mathematics and physics from Macalester College and an M.S. physics and a Ph.D. in physics education from the University of Minnesota. MARGARET HILTON (Study Director) is a senior program officer of the Board on Science Education of the National Academies, where she has directed studies on the assessment of intrapersonal and interpersonal competencies, the effectiveness of team science, and 21st century skills, and high school science laboratories. She also participated in studies on discipline-based education research and learning science through computer games and simulations. Prior to joining the National Academies staff, she was a policy analyst at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where she directed studies of workforce training, work reorganization, and international competitiveness. She has a B.A. in geography from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and an M.A. in education and human development from George Washington University. KAYE HUSBANDS FEALING is chair of the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She specializes in science and innovation policy, the underrepresentation of women and minorities in STEM disciplines and occupations, and international trade policy impacts on industry structure and firm behavior. Previously, she was a professor at the Center AppD-3

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS for Science, Technology and Environmental Policy in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota and William Brough professor of economics at Williams College. She also previously held positions at the National Science Foundation, as the inaugural program director for the Science of Science and Innovation Policy program (SciSIP) and an economics program director. She is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), where she also serves on the executive board. She is on the advisory council of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and the Steering Committee on Subnational Science Policy of the Council of Canadian Academies. She has a B.A. in mathematics and economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. LINDSEY MALCOM-PIQUEUX is the associate director for research and policy at the Center for Urban Education at the University of Southern California and a research associate professor in the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. Her work focuses on the ways in which higher education policy, institutions and practitioners contribute to and/or reduce educational inequities experienced by minoritized student populations. Her primary interest centers on equitable access and outcomes for women and men of color in STEM fields. She is particularly interested in understanding the ways in which community colleges and minority-serving colleges and universities can promote equity in STEM for historically underrepresented populations. She has a B.S. in planetary science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.S. in planetary science from the California Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in urban education with an emphasis on higher education from the University of Southern California. MARCO MOLINARO is the assistant vice provost for educational effectiveness at the University of California, Davis, where he created and oversees the Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE). The CEE team is composed of highly specialized professionals focused on empowering instructors and staff, improving the educational system and fostering educational innovation and discovery all in service of removing disparities in undergraduate student outcomes while maximizing learning. His work has included STEM educational and training programs for middle school through college, as well as undergraduate teaching. He has also been active in creating and leading applications of technology for instruction, scientific visualization and simulation, tools for evidence-based instructional actions, curriculum development and evaluation, and science exhibits for students from elementary school through graduate school and for the general public. He is the founder of the Tools for Evidence-based actions community, a group of researchers and administrators from more than 100 universities dedicated to sharing tools and methodologies that encourage evdence-based instructional actions. He has a B.S. in biophysics and chemistry from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. ROSA RIVERA-HAINAJ is the assistant vice president of academic affairs at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas. She oversees undergraduate education and the Rio Grande Valley Campus. Preceding her appointment in 2017 to Our Lady of the Lake, she was the dean of science and mathematics at Lorain County Community College. In that capacity, she served as member of the core team of the Student Success Agenda. Previously, she held teaching positions in chemistry at Purdue University North Central and James Madison AppD-4

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS University, and she is an active researcher in the fields of chemistry and biochemistry. She has a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico – Mayaguez and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH. GABRIELA WEAVER serves as vice provost for faculty cevelopment and director of the Institute for Teaching Excellence and Faculty Development (TEFD) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Previously, she held positions in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Colorado at Denver and on the faculty at Purdue University in chemistry and science education and as the director of the Discovery Learning Research Center. Her research interests include the development, implementation, and evaluation of instructional practices that engage students and improve their understanding of science and the institutionalization of such practices through the transformation of cultures and processes in higher education. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has a B.S. degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder. YU XIE is the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 university professor of sociology at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies at Princeton University. He is also a visiting chair professor of the Center for Social Research at Peking University. Formerly, he held positions in sociology, statistics, and public policy at the University of Michigan and as a research professor in the Population Studies Center at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His main areas of research are social stratification, demography, and statistical methods. He is a member of the the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Academia Sinica. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has a B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Shanghai University of Technology, and an M.S. in sociology, an M.A. in the history of science and a Ph.D. in sociology, all from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. AppD-5

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Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals generate a stream of scientific discoveries and technological innovations that fuel job creation and national economic growth. Ensuring a robust supply of these professionals is critical for sustaining growth and creating jobs growth at a time of intense global competition. Undergraduate STEM education prepares the STEM professionals of today and those of tomorrow, while also helping all students develop knowledge and skills they can draw on in a variety of occupations and as individual citizens. However, many capable students intending to major in STEM later switch to another field or drop out of higher education altogether, partly because of documented weaknesses in STEM teaching, learning and student supports. Improving undergraduate STEM education to address these weaknesses is a national imperative.

Many initiatives are now underway to improve the quality of undergraduate STEM teaching and learning. Some focus on the national level, others involve multi-institution collaborations, and others take place on individual campuses. At present, however, policymakers and the public do not know whether these various initiatives are accomplishing their goals and leading to nationwide improvement in undergraduate STEM education.

Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education outlines a framework and a set of indicators that document the status and quality of undergraduate STEM education at the national level over multiple years. It also indicates areas where additional research is needed in order to develop appropriate measures. This publication will be valuable to government agencies that make investments in higher education, institutions of higher education, private funders of higher education programs, and industry stakeholders. It will also be of interest to researchers who study higher education.

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