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The Growing Threat to Air Force Mission-Critical Electronics: Lethality at Risk: Unclassified Summary (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Summary from the Workshop Proceedings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Summary from the Workshop Proceedings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Growing Threat to Air Force Mission-Critical Electronics: Lethality at Risk: Unclassified Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25475.
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Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Summary from the Workshop Proceedings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Growing Threat to Air Force Mission-Critical Electronics: Lethality at Risk: Unclassified Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25475.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Summary from the Workshop Proceedings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Growing Threat to Air Force Mission-Critical Electronics: Lethality at Risk: Unclassified Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25475.
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Page 62

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B Summary from the Workshop Proceedings Excerpts from the proceedings of the 2016 Air Force Studies Board workshop on “Optimizing the Air Force Acquisition Strategy of Secure and Reliable Electronic Components” 1 are reprinted below. OVERVIEW In 2012, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), section 818, outlined new requirements for industry to serve as the lead in averting counterfeits in the defense supply chain. Subsequently, the House Armed Services Committee, in its report on the Fiscal Year 2016 NDAA, noted that the pending sale of IBM’s microprocessor fabrication facilities to Global Foundries created uncertainty about future access of the United States to trusted state-of-the-art microelectronic components and directed the Comptroller General to assess the Department of Defense’s (DoD’s) actions and measures to address this threat. In this context, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Science, Technology, and Engineering) requested that the Air Force Studies Board of the National Research Council2 convene a workshop to facilitate an open dialogue with leading industry, academic, and government experts to (1) define the current technological and policy challenges with maintaining a reliable and secure source of microelectronic components; (2) review the current state of acquisition processes within the Air Force for acquiring reliable and secure 1  National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2016, Optimizing the Air Force Acqui- sition Strategy of Secure and Reliable Electronic Components: Proceedings of a Workshop, The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, https://doi.org/10.17226/23561. 2  Effective July 1, 2015, the institution is now called the National Academies of Sciences, Engineer- ing, and Medicine. 60

Appendix B 61 microelectronic components; and (3) explore options for possible business models within the national security complex that would be relevant for the Air Force acquisition com- munity. This report summarizes the results of a workshop held on March 16-18, 2016, in Washington, D.C., which brought together experts from government, industry, and academia to address these issues. ORGANIZATION OF THE WORKSHOP Workshop briefings included information on (1) DoD’s strategy for acquiring secure and reliable microelectronic components, (2) the needs of the nuclear weapons enterprise, (3) Air Force processes to gather reliable and secure information, (4) Defense Micro- Electronics Activity’s (DMEA’s) new role as the sole manager of the Trusted Access Program Office (TAPO), (5) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) technology research and development pro- grams to ensure that obtained parts are secure, and (6) the important role of standards in the manufacture and testing of secure and reliable microelectronic components. Impor- tantly, briefings by industry shed light on the economics of electronics manufacturing and highlighted the pros and cons of government ownership of trusted foundries. One of the issues that was raised repeatedly during presentations was the prohibitive cost associated with dedicated state-of-the-art foundries producing secure and reliable microelectronic components for national security systems. A few participants noted that a main reason associated with the high cost of producing these items is the relatively low volume of items required by DoD and the Intelligence Community in comparison with the commercial marketplace. More than one speaker from government and industry noted that without a reasonable market, industry will find it difficult to support a program based entirely on producing low-volume trusted components for government systems. Other participants commented that another barrier for industry support of producing low-volume trusted components for the government is the burdensome accreditation process the government uses to determine whether a potential supplier is trustworthy. For example, DMEA performs an accreditation process via a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement that allows DMEA to work with a potential supplier every 2 years. More than one participant asked the speaker from DMEA why a supplier would not want to be accredited. Several reasons were provided, including cost, return on investment, fear of not passing the screen- ing, and the potential market share not matching a company’s business model. Yet another participant commented that, on an anecdotal level, existing trusted suppliers who were not receiving requests for trusted fabrication prior to the IBM/Global Foundries sale are now seeing an increase in inquiries because of the sale. Finally, concerns about the burdens on industry associated with the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, as well as the complex U.S. Government acquisition and contracting process, were mentioned by more than one participant during the course of the workshop. Chapter 1 provides a broad contextual background that includes challenges related to current government policies and technological advancements in the area of secure and reliable electronic components in government national security systems. Even though attri- bution to individual speakers or workshop participants is not provided, this section of the report should not be seen as consensus views of the wide representation of views presented throughout the workshop. Chapter 2 goes on to describe the dialogue that occurred at the workshop, followed by Chapter 3, which provides abstracts of speaker presentations.

62 Lethality at Risk Appendixes are provided at the end of the report and include the following items: (1) workshop terms of reference, (2) brief biographies of the workshop committee mem- bers, (3) speakers and attendees list, (4) suggested terms of reference for a follow-on study, and (5) a summary presented by Bernard Meyerson of his thoughts on the projected advancements of existing technology. This proceedings summarizes the views expressed by individual workshop participants. While the committee is responsible for the overall quality and accuracy of the proceedings as a record of what transpired at the workshop, the views contained in the proceedings are not necessarily those of all workshop participants, the committee, or the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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High-performance electronics are key to the U.S. Air Force’s (USAF’s) ability to deliver lethal effects at the time and location of their choosing. Additionally, these electronic systems must be able to withstand not only the rigors of the battlefield but be able to perform the needed mission while under cyber and electronic warfare (EW) attack. This requires a high degree of assurance that they are both physically reliable and resistant to adversary actions throughout their life cycle from design to sustainment.

In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop titled Optimizing the Air Force Acquisition Strategy of Secure and Reliable Electronic Components, and released a summary of the workshop. This publication serves as a follow-on to provide recommendations to the USAF acquisition community.

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