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Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century (2020)

Chapter: Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
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Appendix E

Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

ROBERT GRAHAM (Chair) has spent his career in health policy and the management of health care organizations. He joined the U.S. Public Health Service in 1970, serving a total of 18 years during three tours of duty over the next 30 years. During this time, he was deputy director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the first administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), holding the ranks of rear admiral and assistant surgeon general. He has long been associated with the medical specialty of family medicine, serving as CEO of the American Academy of Family Physicians from 1985 to 2000 and as an endowed professor of family medicine at the University of Cincinnati from 2005 to 2013. Throughout his career, Dr. Graham has written and spoken extensively about a number of critical topics in health policy, such as health care reform and the need for universal coverage, health workforce policy, and the organizational characteristics of effective health care systems. He received his undergraduate degree from Earlham College in 1965 and his medical degree from the University of Kansas in 1970.

RICHARD ADRIEN was an associate program officer on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) at the National Academies, providing research support for the Committee on Applying Lessons of Optimal Adolescent Health to Improve Behavioral Outcomes for Youth through August 2019. Prior to joining the National Academies, he provided technical assistance and research support on issues pertaining to equity, education, and youth development. Additionally, he has counseled youth in educational and community settings to help them identify and attain their

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×

career and educational goals. He received his Ed.M. in international education development from Columbia University and his M.Ed. in counseling from the University of Toronto.

PAMELLA ATAYI is a program coordinator on BCYF, providing logistical and administrative support for the Committee on Applying Lessons of Optimal Adolescent Health to Improve Behavioral Outcomes for Youth. She coordinates and oversees the work of support staff handling clerical, administrative, and logistical aspects of meetings. Ms. Atayi provides work direction and assists with the daily supervision of support staff. She also compiles and summarizes information for the development and revision of a variety of documents and participates in research efforts. She serves as liaison between programs and boards of the National Academies, and related external customers, members, and sponsors on clerical and administrative matters. Ms. Atayi was awarded the Sandra H. Matthews Cecil Award by the Institute of Medicine (now the Health and Medicine Division) in 2013, and the Espirit de Corps Award by the Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education in 2017. She received her B.A. in English from the University of Maryland University College and a diploma in computer information systems from Strayer University.

ANGELA BRYAN is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder. She is co-director of the CUChange Research Laboratory, where her research has focused on a transdisciplinary approach to the study of health and risk behavior and the development of interventions to improve health behaviors. Dr. Bryan capitalizes on the integration of basic scientific discoveries regarding biological predispositions associated with health and risk behavior (e.g., genetics and neurocognition) and applied intervention work to change behavior. Much of her work has focused on the reduction of substance use–related HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk behavior among adolescents. This work has been funded by several institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). She has more than 170 peer-reviewed publications and has been teaching health psychology, social psychology, research methods, and statistical methods to undergraduates and graduate students for more than 20 years. Dr. Bryan received her Ph.D. in social psychology with a quantitative emphasis from Arizona State University.

TAMMY CHANG is an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan and a practicing family physician. She is a health services researcher with a focus on adolescent health, spe-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×

cifically, breaking the cycle of poverty and poor health among adolescent mothers and their children. Her NIH-sponsored research is focused on improving access to reproductive health care and promoting healthy pregnancy weight gain among at-risk adolescents using text messaging, social media mining, and natural language processing (NLP). She is also the founding director of MyVoice, a national text-message poll of youth ages 14 to 24 that uses mixed methods and NLP with the goal of informing local and national policies in real time. She has published in several academic journals and received numerous awards, including the James C. Puffer, M.D./American Board of Family Medicine Fellowship at the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Chang received her M.D. from the University of Michigan.

ROSALIE CORONA is a professor of psychology, director of clinical training, and founding director of the Latina/o Mental Health Clinic at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). Prior to joining the faculty at VCU, she worked as a research scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion. Her community-engaged research focuses on Latina/o and African American adolescents’ health promotion and risk reduction, applying specific expertise in adolescent sexual health and substance use prevention. A theme throughout her scholarship is the role of family and culture in promoting adolescents’ health behaviors. Dr. Corona’s community-engaged research has progressed from an initial focus on identifying local health disparities and the associated risk and protective factors to the development, implementation, and evaluation of family-based prevention programs to address these disparities. She has been a principal investigator or co-investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth. Her reputation as a community-engaged research scholar and teacher has resulted in multiple editorial board invitations, and her accomplishments have also been recognized locally and nationally. Dr. Corona received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from UCLA.

TAMERA COYNE-BEASLEY is a professor of pediatrics and internal medicine, director of the Division of Adolescent Medicine, and vice chair of Pediatrics for Community Engagement at the University of Alabama Birmingham. She has expertise and training in adolescent medicine, medical management, epidemiology, and public health. She also completed a preventive medicine residency/fellowship with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×

Promotion and a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars program with a focus on health services research. Dr. Coyne-Beasley is a past president of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, an international multidisciplinary organization dedicated to promoting the optimal health and well-being of adolescents and young adults. Her academic efforts, community work, policy development, and research have focused on adolescent health, resiliency and risk behaviors, mental health and suicide prevention, health promotion and disease prevention, injury prevention, reducing health disparities, increasing immunizations, improving health care access, community-based participatory and engaged research, practice-based research, sexual and reproductive health, and pregnancy prevention. Dr. Coyne-Beasley received her M.D. from Duke University.

BONNIE HALPERN-FELSHER is a professor in the Division of Adolescent Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University. As a developmental psychologist with training in adolescent and young adult health, she has focused her research on social, environmental, cognitive, and psychosocial factors involved in health-related decision making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication, and risk behavior. Funded by NIH and many foundations, her research has emphasized understanding and reducing adolescent tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, and risky sexual behavior. She is a core member of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, a project coleader for the NIH and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–funded UCSF Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, and a co–principal investigator for the new UC Merced Cannabis and Nicotine Policy Center. Dr. Halpern-Felsher’s research and committee work have been instrumental in setting policy at the local, state, and national levels. She has served as a consultant to a number of community-based adolescent health promotion programs and has been an active member of several national campaigns to understand and reduce adolescent risk behavior. She has also served on five National Academies committees and contributed to three surgeon general reports, all focused on reducing adolescent risk behavior and promoting health. Dr. Halpern-Felsher received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of California, Riverside.

JEFFREY W. HUTCHINSON is a retired U.S. Army colonel currently working in Austin, Texas, as CEO of The Wade Alliance, LLC, a leadership, diversity, and inclusion consulting organization, and a BCYF member at the National Academies. As an adolescent medicine specialist and previous associate dean and chief diversity officer at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, he has a unique perspective on adolescent behavior and health equity. His career includes combat in Iraq,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×

clinical leadership, and executive membership on the American Academy of Pediatrics council on communication and media. With 25 years of experience caring for children, teens, young adults, and service members, he applies the intersection of systems with humanism and communication to help teens and parents. He is an advocate for addressing the social determinants of health disparities and has published in several academic journals. Dr. Hutchinson received his M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco.

REBEKAH HUTTON is a program officer in BCYF, providing research support for the Committee on Applying Lessons of Optimal Adolescent Health to Improve Behavioral Outcomes for Youth since August 2019. Previously, she was an education management and information technology consultant working on projects in the United States as well as Haiti, Equatorial Guinea, and Djibouti. She has also worked as a program manager and researcher at the National Center on Performance Incentives at Vanderbilt University, studying whether teacher pay for performance has a measurable impact on student outcomes, and as an English language lecturer in Tourcoing, France. During her time with BCYF, she has worked on projects focused on fostering the educational success of children and youth learning English; reducing child poverty; and promoting the mental, emotional, and behavioral health of children and youth. She received her M.Ed. degree from Vanderbilt University in international education policy and management and a B.A. degree from the University of Tennessee in French language and literature.

NICOLE F. KAHN is a program officer in BCYF and study director for the Committee on Applying Lessons of Optimal Adolescent Health to Improve Behavioral Outcomes for Youth. Before joining the National Academies, Dr. Kahn worked as a social research specialist with the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she collaborated on research projects focused on postsecondary educational attainment, adolescent sexuality, and childhood and adolescent precursors of adult chronic disease. She has also worked as a project researcher at the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development in Washington, DC, and served as a Head Start teacher with the Teach for America program in Phoenix, Arizona. She received her M.Ed. in early childhood education from Arizona State University and her Ph.D. in maternal and child health from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she studied the sexual experiences and related health outcomes of marginalized populations from adolescence to adulthood.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×

VELMA MCBRIDE MURRY is a professor in the Departments of Health Policy and Human and Organizational Behavior in the School of Medicine and Peabody College and endowed Lois Autrey Betts chair of education and human development at Vanderbilt University, as well as a former BCYF member. Dr. McBride Murry is a nationally recognized expert in examining ways in which racism affects the processes, behaviors, and health outcomes of families, and has conducted developmental, prospective studies on African American parents and youth for more than 15 years to identify proximal, malleable protective factors that deter youth risk engagement. This work has advanced current knowledge of the impact of contextual factors, particularly racism, on African American family functioning through the development of novel strength-based family prevention interventions, including the Strong African American Families and Pathways for African American Success programs. Both programs are designed to enhance parenting and family processes to in turn encourage youth to delay age at sexual onset and the initiation and escalation of alcohol and drug use. Dr. McBride Murry has published more than 125 papers and received more than 25 external grants to fund her research activities. She received her Ph.D. in human development and family studies from the University of Missouri, Columbia.

SANDRA JO WILSON is a principal associate in the Social and Economic Policy Division at Abt Associates. Dr. Wilson’s work focuses on approaches to developing and packaging actionable evidence on effective programs. She is an expert in the design and conduct of meta-analyses and systematic reviews and has broad content knowledge relevant to youth prevention programs. She currently leads a project supported by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation to develop practice guidelines for youth programs using a common components approach to evidence-based practice. In addition, she is project director for the Prevention Services Clearinghouse, an evidence clearinghouse established by the Administration for Children and Families to systematically review research on programs and services intended to provide enhanced support to children and families and prevent foster care placements. Dr. Wilson’s functional skills include research design, research synthesis, statistical analysis, product development, and technical assistance. Her domain expertise includes school-based violence prevention, juvenile delinquency, high school dropout prevention, college/career readiness, and early childhood education. Dr. Wilson received her Ph.D. in policy development and program evaluation from Vanderbilt University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
Page 175
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
Page 176
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
Page 177
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
Page 178
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25552.
×
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Adolescence is a critical growth period in which youth develop essential skills that prepare them for adulthood. Prevention and intervention programs are designed to meet the needs of adolescents who require additional support and promote healthy behaviors and outcomes. To ensure the success of these efforts, it is essential that they include reliably identifiable techniques, strategies, or practices that have been proven effective.

Promoting Positive Adolescent Health Behaviors and Outcomes: Thriving in the 21st Century identifies key program factors that can improve health outcomes related to adolescent behavior and provides evidence-based recommendations toward effective implementation of federal programming initiatives. This study explores normative adolescent development, the current landscape of adolescent risk behavior, core components of effective programs focused on optimal health, and recommendations for research, programs, and policies.

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