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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Attracting Investment at General Aviation Airports Through Public–Private Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25560.
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Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Attracting Investment at General Aviation Airports Through Public–Private Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25560.
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Page 51

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

50 1. World Bank. What Are Public–Private Partnerships? http://ppp.worldbank.org/public-private-partnership/ overview/what-are-public-private-partnerships. Accessed December 14, 2017. 2. Ernico, S., et al. ACRP Report 66: Considering and Evaluating Airport Privatization. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2012. 3. U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Airport Categories. https://www.faa.gov/airports/planning_capacity/passenger_allcargo_stats/categories/. 4. USDOT, FAA. Report to Congress: National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS) 2017–2021, 2017. 5. Pula, K. Public–Private Partnerships for Transportation: Categorization and Analysis of State Statutes. National Council of State Legislatures, Washington, D.C., 2016. 6. Friedman, S. B. (ed.) Successful Public/Private Partnerships: From Principles to Practices. Urban Land Institute. Washington, D.C., 2016. 7. Ward, S., L. Wilson, R. Schnug, T. Thatcher, D. Fainberg, and K. Yodice. ACRP Research Report 176: Generat- ing Revenue from Commercial Development on or Adjacent to Airports. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2017. 8. Buxbaum, J. N., and I. N. Ortiz. NCHRP Synthesis 391: Public-Sector Decision Making for Public–Private Partnerships. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2009. 9. Rall, J., J. B. Reed, and N. J. Farber. Public–Private Partnerships for Transportation: A Toolkit for Legislators. National Council of State Legislatures, Washington, D.C., 2010. 10. USDOT. Report to Congress on Public–Private Partnerships. Cited in User Guidebook for Implementing Public–Private Partnerships for Transportation Infrastructure Projects in the United States. Final report, 2004. 11. USDOT, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Center for Innovative Finance Support: Project Profile—Chicago Skyway. https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ipd/project_profiles/il_chicago_skyway.aspx. Accessed February 6, 2018. 12. U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). Highway Public–Private Partnerships: More Rigorous Up-front Analysis Could Better Secure Potential Benefits and Protect the Public Interest. GAO-08-44. Wash- ington, DC, 2008. 13. Chasey, A., W. Maddex, and A. Bansal. Comparison of Public–Private Partnerships and Traditional Procure- ment Methods in North American Highway Construction. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2268, 2012, pp. 26–32. 14. Zhao, Z. J., E. Saunoi-Sandgren, and A. Barnea. Advancing Public Interest in Public–Private Partnership of State Highway Development. Minnesota Department of Transportation, Saint Paul, 2011. 15. United Kingdom National Audit Office. Private Finance Projects: A Paper for the Lords Economic Affairs Committee. London, 2009. 16. Gilroy, L. Modernizing and Expanding Pennsylvania’s Transportation Infrastructure Through Public– Private Partnerships. Testimony before the Pennsylvania House Republican Policy Committee, Los Angeles, California. Reason Foundation, Los Angeles, 2009. 17. Jeffers, J., C. McDavid, J. Broadhurst, K. Grosskopf, J. Jones, E. Kamnikar, J. Kamnikar, J. Mayer, C. Rosti, and B. Scott. Audit Stewardship and Oversight of Large and Innovatively Funded Projects in Europe. Technical Report FHWA-PL-07-001. USDOT, FHWA, 2007. 18. Urahn, S. Drive by Dollars: What States Should Know When Considering Public-Private Partnerships to Fund Transportation. Pew Center on the States, Washington, D.C., 2009. 19. Pula, K. Public–Private Partnerships for Transportation Categorization and Analysis of State Statutes. National Conference of State Legislatures, Washington, D.C., 2016. http://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/ public-private-partnerships-for-transportation-categorization-and-analysis-of-state-statutes-january- 2016.aspx. References

References 51 20. Public Law 97-248. The Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982. 21. Kirk, R. S. Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Reauthorization Issues for Congress. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 2009. 22. Inhofe, J. M. Forward Looking Investment in General Aviation, Hangars, and Tarmacs (FLIGHT) Act of 2017. https://www.inhofe.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/inhofe-duckworth-introduce-flight-act. Accessed December 14, 2017. 23. Poole Jr., R. W. Annual Privatization Report 2015: Air Transportation. Reason Foundation, Los Angeles, Calif., 2015. 24. USDOT, FAA. Fact Sheet—Airport Privatization Pilot Program. https://www.faa.gov/news/fact_sheets/news_ story.cfm?newsId=21614. Accessed October 5, 2017. 25. Tang, R. Y. Airport Privatization: Issues and Options for Congress. Congressional Research Services, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 2016. 26. Nichol, C. ACRP Synthesis 1: Innovative Finance and Alternative Sources of Revenue for Airports. Transporta- tion Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2007. 27. Daniels, F. B. Gary/Chicago Airport Closes $100M Public-Private Partnership Deal. https://www.faegrebd.com/ gary-chicago-airport-closes-100m-public-private-partnership-deal. Accessed October 5, 2017. 28. Crider, R. ACRP Report 47: Guidebook for Developing and Leasing Airport Property. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2011. 29. Wieters, K. W., and J. Borowiec. An Examination of Methods for Increasing On-Airport Revenue. Texas Trans- portation Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, 2004. 30. USDOT, FAA. Overview: What Is AIP? https://www.faa.gov/airports/aip/overview/. Accessed October 5, 2017. 31. USDOT, FAA. Airport Improvement Program Sponsor Guide. 2013. 32. USDOT, FAA. Grant Assurances (Obligations). https://www.faa.gov/airports/aip/grant_assurances/. Accessed October 5, 2017. 33. Kaplan Kirsch Rockwell. P3 Airport Projects: An Introduction for Airport Lawyers. Denver, Colo., 2017. 34. USDOT, FAA. FAA Airport Compliance Manual—Order 5190.6B. 2009. 35. AvPorts. AvPorts: About Us. https://avports.com/about-us/. Accessed October 23, 2017. 36. American Airports Corporation. American Airports Corporation: About Us. http://www.americanairports. com/aboutaac.aspx. Accessed October 23, 2017. 37. Texas Aviation Partners. Texas Aviation Partners: About Us. http://www.texasaviationpartners.com/. Accessed October 23, 2017. 38. Airports Worldwide. Airports Worldwide. http://www.airportsworldwide.com/. 39. City of Fort Worth. Aviation Department: 5-Year Capital Improvement Plan Fiscal Years 2017–2021: Con- tinuing Sustainability and Provision of High-Quality, Cost-Effective Facilities to Meet the General Aviation Needs of North Texas. 2017. 40. USDOT, FAA. Airport Master Record—Fort Worth Meacham International Airport. 41. Google Maps. Google Maps—Fort Worth Meacham International Airport. 42. USDOT, FAA. Airport Master Record: Crater Lake–Klamath Regional. 2017. 43. Google Maps. Google Maps: Crater Lake–Klamath Regional Airport. 44. USDOT, FAA. FAA Master Record—McKinney National Airport. http://www.airnav.com/airport/KTKI. 45. Google Maps. Google Maps—McKinney National Airport. 46. USDOT, FAA. FAA Airport Master Record—Morristown Municipal Airport. 2017. 47. Google Maps. Google Maps—Morristown Municipal Airport. 48. FAA Airport Master Record—Cecil Airport. 2017. 49. Google Maps. Google Maps—Cecil Airport. 50. Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Executive Summary: National Symposium on the Barriers and Oppor- tunities for Infrastructure Renewal. September 17–18, 2017, College Station, Tex. http://infrastructure. tameconf.wpengine.com/summary-reports/. 51. USDOT, FHWA. FHWA Center for Innovative Program Delivery: P3 Toolkit. Accessed October 25, 2017.

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Although general aviation airports have historically been funded by federal, state, and local entities, the private sector is increasingly playing a larger role. This involvement has ranged on a continuum from service and management contracts to singular projects at airports that involve leasing mechanisms to long-term leases and the whole-scale private development of general aviation airports.

In an era of declining resources and increasingly scrutinized public expenditures, private-sector involvement is and will likely need to continue to play a larger role to fill an ongoing and increasing gap between the existing infrastructure and the infrastructure that is needed.

Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 94: Attracting Investment at General Aviation Airports Through Public–Private Partnerships explore public–private partnerships (PPPs) at general aviation airports in the United States over the past five years.

For the purpose of the synthesis, these PPPs are defined by the World Bank as long-term contracts between a private party and a government entity for providing a public asset or service, in which the private party bears significant risk and management responsibility, and remuneration is linked to performance

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