National Academies Press: OpenBook

Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances (2020)

Chapter: Appendix G - City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors

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Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G - City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
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Page 111
Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G - City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
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Page 112
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G - City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
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Page 113

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111 City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors A P P E N D I X G The City of Orlando has extensive provisions related to interparcel cross access in Chapter 61: Roadway Design and Access Management of its Land Development Code (City of Orlando, 1991, as amended 2018). These provisions are reproduced verbatim here as a resource to readers. Sec. 61.107. - Closing of Existing Curb cuts. Wherever a driveway or curb cut is permitted in accordance with the requirements of the Access Management Classification System and Standards, access rights along the remaining thoroughfare frontage shall be dedicated to the City, and all other pre-existing driveways and curb cuts shall be closed and eliminated. In the case of a joint-use driveway, the property owner shall at his own expense, enter into a written agreement with the City, recorded in the records of Orange County and running with the land, that pre-existing curb cuts on the building site will be closed and eliminated after the construction of both sides. Sec. 61.109. - Cross-Access Corridors. The Planning Official, in coordination with the Public Works Director shall be authorized to designate cross-access corridors on properties adjacent to thoroughfares. Such designation may be made in connection with the approval of any subdivision or site plan within the affected area, or as part of an overall planning program. Design of Cross-Access Corridors. Cross-access corridors shall be designed to provide unified access and circulation among parcels on each block of the thoroughfare, in order to assist in local traffic movement (see illustration). Each corridor should be designed to include the following elements: (a) A continuous linear travel corridor extending the entire length of the block which it serves, or at least 1000 feet linear frontage along the thoroughfare, and having a design speed of 10 mph. Final design of the facility shall be approved by the Public Works Director. (b) Sufficient width to accommodate two-way travel aisles designed to accommodate automobiles, service vehicles and loading vehicles in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 61, Part 3. (c) Stub-outs and other design features which made it visually obvious that the abutting properties may be tied in to provide cross-access. (d) Linkage to other cross-access corridors in the area.

112 Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances Wherever a cross-access corridor has been designated in accordance with Section 61.109, the business sites within the affected area shall be so designed as to provide for mutually coordinated or joint parking, access and circulation systems, and shall include stub-outs and other design features as necessary to make it visually obvious that the abutting properties may be tied in to create a unified system. Development Prior to Abutting Use. In the event that the building site is developed prior to an abutting property, it shall be designed to ensure that its parking, access and circulation may be easily tied in to create a unified system at a later date. Existing Abutting Uses. In the event that the building site abuts an existing developed property, it shall be so designed as to tie into the abutting parking, access and circulation to create a unified system unless the Planning Official finds that this would be impractical. Sec. 61.111. - Design to Accommodate Service Vehicles. Each unified access and circulation system shall be so designed that the cross-access corridor(s) and coordinated or joint parking systems will allow adequate access for service and loading vehicles to each business site, and all easements, agreements and stipulations shall so provide. Sec. 61.112. - Joint Cross-Access Maintenance Easement. Wherever cross-access corridors or coordinated or joint parking design is provided in accordance with this Part, each applicant for subdivision plat or site plan approval shall provide such easements, agreements and stipulations as may be necessary to ensure that adjoining properties may be easily tied together to create a unified system allowing general cross-access to and from the other properties in the affected area and have joint maintenance responsibility for said easement. Such easements, agreements and stipulations shall be recorded in the public records of Orange County and constitute a covenant running with the land. Sec. 61.113. - Tie-Ins to Abutting Properties. Phased Development in Same Ownership. Where the abutting properties are in the same ownership, no subdivision plat or site plan shall be approved unless all building sites within the affected area are made subject to the necessary easements, agreements and stipulations required by this Part, which shall be recorded as a binding lot agreement prior to the issuance of any Building Permits. Leasing Situations. Where individual building site(s) within an overall development site are leased rather than owned fee-simple, the development site shall be subject to all requirements of this Part. The owner of the development site and the lessee of the building site shall be jointly and individually responsible for compliance with these requirements. Failure to comply shall be considered a violation of this Chapter subject to enforcement in accordance with Chapter 5 of the City Code. In such cases, citations of violation shall be issued both to the owner of the development site, and to all lessees within the affected area. Easements Required to be Dedicated. Wherever a cross-access corridor is designated by the Planning Official no subdivision plat, site plan or other development shall be approved unless the property owner shall grant an easement, running with the land, allowing general cross-access to and from the other properties in the affected area. Such easement shall be recorded in the public records of Orange County and constitute a covenant running with the land. Indication on the Zoning Map. Wherever the Planning Official designates a cross-access corridor, he shall cause the corridor to be indicated on the Official Zoning Map by means of dashed or dotted lines or other suitable symbols. This indication shall distinguish those portions of the designated corridor for which easements have been granted. Sec. 61.110. - Coordinated or Joint Parking Design.

City of Orlando Cross Access Corridors 113 Abutting Properties in Different Ownership. Where the abutting properties are in different ownership cooperation between the various owners is encouraged but not required. Only the building site(s) under consideration for development approval shall be required to be subject to the necessary easements, agreements and stipulations required by this Part which shall be recorded as a Binding Lot Agreement prior to the issuance of any Building Permits. Abutting properties developed at a later date shall at that time provide unified access and circulation, together with all necessary easements, agreements and stipulations. Where Unified Access and Circulation Is Not Practical. The Planning Official in coordination with the Public Works Director shall be authorized to modify the requirements of this Part where he finds that abutting properties have been so developed that it is clearly impractical to create a unified access and circulation system within part or all of the affected area. Sec. 61.241. - Joint-Use Driveways. No curb cut for a driveway approach shall be made within 3 feet of the extended side property line of the property to be serviced by the driveway unless a joint-use driveway for the two adjoining properties shall be located on the common property line by written agreement running with the land, filed with the Zoning Official and signed by all the owners of the adjoining property using the common driveway. The execution of the said agreement must be acknowledged by all parties executing it (notarized).

Next: Appendix H - Site Plan Review Checklist for Access »
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Managing access connections to roadways is vital to safety and operational performance of roadways for all users. Given the separation of authority between state and local governments over land development and access, intergovernmental coordination is integral to effective access management.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Synthesis 549: Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances documents regulatory tools and practices used by local governments to implement access management, as well as provides examples of how state transportation agencies are coordinating with local governments to advance access management objectives.

The review of local ordinances and state and local government coordination practices indicates that access management is being actively implemented throughout the United States. Typical features of local ordinances reviewed included access classification schemes and corresponding spacing standards, interparcel cross access requirements, intersection functional area or corner clearance standards, limits on driveways per site, unified access and circulation requirements for outparcels, allowances for deviations from standards, and access permitting and development (site plan) review procedures and criteria.

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