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Suggested Citation:"1 Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Developing Health Literacy Skills in Children and Youth: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25888.
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Page 1
Suggested Citation:"1 Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Developing Health Literacy Skills in Children and Youth: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25888.
×
Page 2
Suggested Citation:"1 Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Developing Health Literacy Skills in Children and Youth: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25888.
×
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"1 Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Developing Health Literacy Skills in Children and Youth: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25888.
×
Page 4

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

1 Introduction1 Since the publication of Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Con­ fusion in 2004, health literacy has become a much more common consider- ation within the field of public health. However, there is a dearth of research and practice specifically regarding youth health literacy.2 As children and youth age, they increasingly interact with the health system, have access to all forms of information, and gradually learn to manage their own health. Higher levels of health literacy will be key for positive health outcomes later in their lives (IOM, 2004; Manganello, 2008). Research has demon- strated that, much like adults, youth may be interested in information about their health, but may also find the information difficult to comprehend (­ anganello, 2008). Effective health education programs should begin in M early childhood and continually build on previous knowledge (IOM, 2004). Additionally, young people develop health literacy skills in a variety of environments, facing critical thinking challenges about their health from school, home and family life, peers and social life, and online. Accordingly, the Roundtable on Health Literacy convened a workshop on the subject of developing health literacy skills in youth on November 19, 2019, in Washington, DC. An ad hoc planning committee developed the workshop 1  This Proceedings of a Workshop was prepared by the rapporteur as a factual summary of what occurred at the workshop. The planning committee’s role was limited to planning and convening the workshop. The views contained in the proceedings are those of individual par- ticipants and do not necessarily represent the views of all workshop participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2  Throughout this proceedings, “youth” refers to young people between the ages of 14 and 26, but in some contexts will include children between the ages of 2 and 13. 1 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

2 DEVELOPING HEALTH LITERACY SKILLS IN CHILDREN AND YOUTH agenda around a holistic view of factors related to health literacy skills in youth, and examined places, people, and partnerships involved in such skill development. The planning committee developed the workshop agenda and its objectives, which were: • To explicate the necessity of developing health literacy skills in youth • To examine the research on developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones and transitions and measuring health literacy in youth • To explore how youth learn about health and opportunities to develop health literacy skills through places, people, and partnerships The planning committee invited expert speakers to discuss their own research, practices, and individual recommendations for best practices for the workshop attendees and broader public. The Statement of Task can be found in Box 1-1 and the agenda can be found in Appendix A. BOX 1-1 Statement of Task An ad hoc planning committee will plan and conduct a 1-day public workshop that will feature invited presentations and discussion on developing health literacy skills among youth from early childhood to young adulthood. The workshop dis- cussions may consider all of the settings where youth consume information and misinformation that shapes their behaviors and attitudes regarding their health, including • Schools • Family • Clinics/health care settings • Community • Media • Peer groups The workshop will address the state of the science around programs and interventions to develop health literacy skills in youth from early childhood to young adulthood and may include presentations and discussion related to the following issues: •  hat are the developmentally appropriate health literacy milestones for W each age? •  hat are the individual and population metrics for measuring health literacy W in youth? PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

INTRODUCTION 3 BOX 1-1 Continued •  hat are the challenges of transitioning from one age group to the next in W terms of gaining greater responsibility for self-care, healthy behaviors, and managing health conditions? •  hat programs/interventions are available to develop youth understanding W of their roles and responsibilities in managing their own health? •  hat types of programs/interventions should be developed and tested to W develop health literacy in youth? •  here are the opportunities to learn from related disciplines, such as W e ­ lementary and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics educa- tion and transition readiness research? The planning committee will define the specific topics to be addressed, ­ evelop d the agenda, select and invite speakers and other participants, and moderate the discussions. A proceedings of the presentations and discussions at the workshop will be prepared by a designated rapporteur in accordance with institutional guidelines. REFERENCES IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2004. Health literacy: A prescription to end confusion. Wash- ington, DC: The National Academies Press. Manganello, J. A. 2008. Health literacy and adolescents: A framework and agenda for future research. Health Education Research 23(5):840–847. doi: 10.1093/her/cym069. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Young people develop health literacy skills in a variety of environments, facing critical thinking challenges about their health from school, home and family life, peers and social life, and online. To explore the development of health literacy skills in youth, the Roundtable on Health Literacy convened a workshop on November 19, 2019, in Washington, DC. Presenters at the workshop discussed factors relating to health literacy skills and ways to further develop those skills among youth from early childhood to young adulthood. This publication summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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