National Academies Press: OpenBook

Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water (1996)

Chapter: A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

« Previous: 6 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×

APPENDICES

Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×

APPENDIX A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Joel D. Sipes (chair), is a retired rear admiral of the U.S. Coast Guard. In that capacity, he managed all Coast Guard activities in the navigable waters in the northeast United States out to 200 miles. Prior to that posting, RADM Sipes served in Washington as chief, Office of Marine Safety, Security and Environmental Protection. In that position he was responsible for national programs involving design, construction, and inspection of commercial vessels; the safe transportation of oil and hazardous materials; licensing and certification of seamen; port safety and security; and marine pollution prevention and response activities. He also led the U.S. delegation to the International Maritime Organization. RADM Sipes received a B.A. in general engineering from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Rhode Island.

John W. Boylston is the president of Argent Marine Operations, Inc. He has an extensive background in naval architecture; he is responsible for refurbishment and return of liquefied natural gas vessels to be deployed for trade, has managed tanker design projects, and was responsible for the design and construction of 13 container ships and the conversion of 35 others. Mr. Boylston has worked on four National Research Council panels addressing human error in navigation, tank vessel design, research needs to prevent collisions, and replenishment of combat vessels by container ships. He is a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and of the American Bureau of Shipping. He received a B.S. degree in marine transportation from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and a B.S.E. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×

James T. Carlton is director of the Maritime Studies Program at Mystic Seaport and professor of marine sciences at Williams College. Dr. Carlton's research interests are in the ecology, biogeography, and dispersal mechanisms of introduced species in marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments and the effects of invasions on the structure of natural communities. He is the principal investigator for the National Biological Invasions Shipping Study, a study authorized in the 1990 Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act. Dr. Carlton has served on several national and international committees. He is chair of the Working Group on Introductions and Transfers of Marine Organisms of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, co-chair of the Committee on Biological Diversity in Marine Systems of the National Research Council, and a member of the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Advisory Panel on the introduction of marine pest species. Dr. Carlton received a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis.

Michael J. Fordham is former group vice president of CAST, an intermodal shipping company, where his responsibilities encompassed marine and container operations, commercial/chartering, bulk, conventional and passenger divisions, and group risk and asset management. Mr. Fordham's career began at BP Tanker Company, where his duties covered a wide range of tanker operations. Upon becoming master and coming ashore, his responsibilities expanded to include vessel operations and management. Involvement in several BP group projects followed, many of which resulted in International Maritime Organization ratification by member nations, including, at the concept stage, the now globally adopted crude oil washing system. Mr. Fordham is a master mariner and received a National Diploma in nautical science and a commission in Her Majesty's Royal Navy Reserve.

Michael G. Parsons is associate dean for undergraduate education and professor of naval architecture and marine engineering at the University of Michigan. He is responsible for introducing several new courses to the university curriculum, including Ship Power Systems and Introduction to Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. His research focus is on ship design improvements for safety and operational aspects, and he has published numerous papers in this area. Dr. Parsons recently carried out a study for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on ship operational safety aspects of ballast exchange at sea. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Michigan, he was employed as a fluid systems engineer for the U.S. Navy. Dr. Parsons is a member of several organizations, including the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, (past chair of the Great Lakes and Great Rivers section) and has served on the Council of Sea Grant Directors. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Michigan, a masters degree from the Catholic University of America, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×

Ray Skelton is environmental and government affairs director and foreign trade zone manager for the Seaway Port Authority of Duluth, Minnesota. His responsibilities involve close contact with state and federal governments as well as maritime-related companies and associations. He currently represents Great Lakes ports on several committees, including the Voluntary Ballast Control Committee, the American Association of Port Authorities' Harbors, Navigation and Environment Committee, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ruffe Task Force. He is also president of the U.S. Propeller Club Duluth-Superior Chapter. Captain Skelton received a first class pilot's license in 1972 and a master's license in 1976 from the Associated Maritime Officers School of Navigation.

Alan H. Taylor is environmental and crisis systems manager with BHP Transport, located in Melbourne, Australia, where he is in charge of risk management, crisis and emergency management, and all environmental matters of BHP's international transport business. Mr. Taylor has been actively involved in ballast water technology research through the Australian Quarantine Inspection Services' Ballast Water Management and Scientific Committees and the International Maritime Organization's Ballast Water Working Group. Prior work includes appointments as technical manager of ALSOC Pty Ltd., where he led teams in the technical development of seven liquefied natural gas carriers, and as engineer and technical superintendent and assistant to operations manager for Jardine Mathesons Company, Ltd., in Hong Kong. Mr. Taylor is a fellow of the Institute of Marine Engineers, a member of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects, and a chartered engineer registered with the Engineering Council (United Kingdom).

E. Dail Thomas II is head of the Environmental Effects Branch, Materials Science and Technology Division at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. His work with the Navy is concentrated in the areas of biofouling control, corrosion engineering, and heavy metal discharge. Prior to this appointment, he headed the corrosion engineering staff at the Naval Research Laboratory in Key West, Florida. Mr. Thomas has conducted studies of engineering alloy heat transfer losses due to biofouling and has developed dockside and shipboard systems, including hypobromite generators and monitors/sensors, to control biofouling accumulation in seawater cooling systems. He received a B.S. degree from the University of Maryland and an M.S. degree from the University of Delaware.

Thomas D. Waite is associate dean for research and graduate studies and professor of environmental engineering at the University of Miami in Florida. He also serves as director of the Laboratories for Pollution Control Technologies at the university. His research includes disinfection of waste water effluents and sludge and the use of innovative and new treatments for remediation of hazardous wastes. Dr. Waite has also served as research engineer at the David Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center. During his tenure, his work focused on application of technologies

Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×

for treatment of oily bilge water in vessels. Other achievements include development of the academic program for environmental engineering at the University of Miami. Dr. Waite received both bachelors and masters degrees from Northeastern University and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. He is a registered professional engineer with the state of Florida.

Judith S. Weis is professor of biological sciences at Rutgers University. Dr. Weis' research area is the responses of estuarine organisms to stresses, including contaminants, and she has published extensively on that subject. Dr. Weis has served as associate dean for academic affairs at the university and as developer and coordinator of the Science, Technology, and Society Program between Rutgers and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, she served as congressional science fellow for the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, where she worked on several legislative initiatives to control toxic substances and protect drinking water. Recently, she was a visiting scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and she has provided expertise to the EPA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on marine pollution, in addition to serving as a board member of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. She is a former member of the Marine Board. Dr. Weis received a B.A. Degree from Cornell University and M.S. and Ph.d. degrees from New York University.

Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS." National Research Council. 1996. Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5294.
×
Page 98
Next: B COMMITTEE MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES »
Stemming the Tide: Controlling Introductions of Nonindigenous Species by Ships' Ballast Water Get This Book
×
Buy Hardback | $58.00 Buy Ebook | $46.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The European zebra mussel in the Great Lakes, a toxic Japanese dinoflagellate transferred to Australia--such biologically and economically harmful stowaways have made it imperative to achieve better management of ballast water in ocean-going vessels.

Stemming the Tide examines the introduction of nonindigenous species through ballast water discharge. Ballast is any solid or liquid that is taken aboard ship to achieve more controlled and safer operation. This expert volume

  • Assesses current national and international approaches to the problem and makes recommendations for U.S. government agencies, the U.S. maritime industry, and the member states of the International Maritime Organization.
  • Appraises technologies for controlling the transfer of organisms--biocides, filtration, heat treatment, and others --with a view toward developing the most promising methods for shipboard demonstration.
  • Evaluates methods for monitoring the effectiveness of ballast water management in removing unwanted organisms. The book addresses the constraints inherent in ballast water management, notably shipboard ballast treatment and monitoring. Also, the committee outlines efforts to set an acceptable level of risk for species introduction using the techniques of risk analysis.

Stemming the Tide will be important to all stakeholders in the issue of unwanted species introduction through ballast discharge: policymakers, port authorities, shippers, ship operators, suppliers to the maritime industry, marine biologists, marine engineers, and environmentalists.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!