National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: The Standards: A Guide for Professional Development
Suggested Citation:"The Montana Systemic Teacher Education Preparation of Teachers." National Research Council. 1997. Improving Teacher Preparation and Credentialing Consistent with the National Science Education Standards: Report of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5592.
×

research on one's own classroom teaching. The standard also includes opportunities for teachers to deepen their content knowledge over time—to know where to go and how to stay up to date in their disciplines.

Professional Development Standard D: Coherent, Quality Programs

This standard is about organization, the structure of programs, and being more programmatic about professional development at all levels. This is really what you are here to talk about, for we need coherent and integrated programs at all levels. Some of the coherence-building pieces are goals and visions that are shared among all the different parts of the science education community.

We heard earlier about how important it is for all parties involved in the preparation of teachers to work together, coordinating the components and building in those same elements of continuous assessment, reflection, improvement, and collaboration that you have seen before. We need less separation of science and teaching; pedagogical content knowledge is the glue. We need less separation of theory and practice; being on site in the context of the learning situation is the glue. We need less individual learning and more collegial and collaborative learning. We need less fragmentation and more coherence.

We need the courage to go off the beaten path, and I wish you success with the programs you will be putting together.

The Montana Systemic Teacher Education Preparation Project (STEP)

Robert Briggs, Montana State Systemic Initiative Lyle Anderson and Elizabeth Charron, Montana State University

Meeting the challenge of Standards-based reform has already begun in many states. Current efforts in Montana, Louisiana, and Connecticut were described, not as exemplars, but to stimulate discussion on lessons learned and the potential for adapting successful strategies in other states.

The Montana STEP collaborative involves five units in our state's university system, seven tribal colleges, school districts, and the State Office of Public Instruction. Project leaders were well aware that to accomplish any kind of mathematics and science reform in the state, they would have to be collaborative and involve all aspects of the system. Montana is the fourth largest state in the United States but has a relatively small, spread-out population, which complicates the desire for collaboration. Therefore, telecommunication was used heavily in our project.

Breaking down human barriers to communication was the next challenge. Elementary teachers did not talk very much to middle school teachers, high school teachers, or university departments in either the education or the scientific disciplines. They certainly did not do a lot of talking across disciplines, between mathematics and science, for example, or any of the other disciplines. Improving communication and coordination among organizations, teachers, and others directly involved with education in sciences and mathematics was a priority.

Suggested Citation:"The Montana Systemic Teacher Education Preparation of Teachers." National Research Council. 1997. Improving Teacher Preparation and Credentialing Consistent with the National Science Education Standards: Report of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5592.
×
Page 8
Next: The Louisiana Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers »
Improving Teacher Preparation and Credentialing Consistent with the National Science Education Standards: Report of a Symposium Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $36.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF
  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!