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Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Bibliography

SUPPLY CHAIN CONCEPTS

Theory and Concepts

Bovet, D.S., and Y. Sheffi. 1998. The brave new world of supply chain management. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 14–22.

Bowman, R.J. 1997. Link by link: global supply chains. Distribution 96(8): 88–90.

Burgess, R. 1998. Avoiding supply chain management failure: lessons from business process re-engineering. International Journal of Logistics Management 9(1): 15–23.


Copacino, W.C. 1998. Copacino on strategy: get the complete supply chain picture. Logistics Management and Distribution Report 37(11):45.


Fox, M.L., and J.L. Holmes. 1998. A model for market leadership. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 54–61.


Krause, D., and R. Handfield. 1999. Developing a world class supply base. Tempe, Ariz.: National Association of Purchasing Managers Center for Advanced Purchasing Studies.


La Londe, B.J. 1999. Executing in the red zone. Supply Chain Management Review 35(2): 7–9.


Mariotti, J.L. 1999. The trust factor in supply chain management. Supply Chain Management Review 35(2): 70–77.


Narus, J.A., and J.C. Anderson. 1996. Rethinking distribution: adaptive channels. Harvard Business Review 74(4): 112–120.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Schlegel, G.L. 1999. Supply chain optimization: a practitioner's perspective. Supply Chain Management Review 35(1): 50–57.

Approaches and Trends

Atkinson, H. 1999. Sun is rising on plan to remove bar between customers, suppliers. Journal of Commerce, 419(29, 379): 1–14.


Fine, C. 1999. The primacy of chains. Supply Chain Management Review 35(2): 79–88.


Guzak, R.J., and D.M. Hill. 1998. Operations franchise: leveraging your supply chain for profitable growth. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 62–69.


Hutchinson, B., and J.G. Welty. 1998. Global trends in the consumer markets. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 58–66.


Laseter, T.M. 1999. Integrating the supply web. Supply Chain Management Review 35(1): 87–94.


Mentzer, J.T., and C.C. Bienstock. 1998. The seven principles of sales-forecasting systems. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 76–83.


Schwalbe, R.J. 1998. SMART 2001: supply chain management, Siemens style. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 69–75.

SUPPLY CHAIN INITIATIVES

Financial

Cooke, J.A. 1998. Panning for gold. Logistics Management and Distribution Report 37(11): 59–62.


Malone, R. 1998. Balancing inventory with customer service. Inbound Logistics 18(8): 10–11.

Inventory

Quinn, F.J. 1998. Balancing demand and supply. Logistics Management and Distribution Report 37(10): 67.

Logistics

Huppertz, P. 1999. Market changes require new supply chain thinking. Transportation & Distribution 40(3): 70–74.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

Manufacturing

Adaptable manufacturing: agility to cost-effectively produce on demand. 1998. Modern Materials Handling 53(6): 14–16.

Postponement

van Hoek, R.I. 1998. Reconfiguring the supply chain to implement postponed manufacturing. The International Journal of Logistics Management 9(1): 95–110.


Postponement systems: waiting to the last minute is a virtue. 1998 Modern Materials Handling 53(6): 27–28.

Procurement

Anderson, M.G., and P.B. Katz. 1998. Strategic sourcing. International Journal of Logistics Management 9(1): 1–13.


Handfield, R.B., and D.R. Krause. 1999. Think globally, source locally. Supply Chain Management Review 35(1): 36–46.

Hoffman, K.C. 1998. Automakers push for ever-closer collaboration with suppliers. Global Sites and Logistics 2(8): 38–42.

Warehousing and Distribution Centers

Bowman, R.J. 1998. It's not your father's warehouse. Warehousing Management 5(5): 32–33.

Third-Party Providers

Menon, M.K., M.A. McGinnis, and K.B. Ackerman. 1998. Selection criteria for providers of third-party logistics services: an exploratory study. Journal of Business Logistics 19(1): 121–137.


Thomas, J. 1999. Chain reaction. Logistics Management and Distribution Report 38(1): 55.

Reverse Logistics

Buxbaum, P. 1998. The reverse logistics files. Inbound Logistics 18(9): 62–67.


Marien, E.J. 1998. Reverse logistics as competitive strategy. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 43–52.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

SUPPLY CHAIN IMPLEMENTATION

Benchmarking and Metrics

Dawe, R.L. 1998. Mobilizing for global excellence. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 11–13.


Jennings, B.D. 1998. Supply chain economics making your shots count. Logistics, Winter/Spring newsletter, pp. 2–5. Mercer Management Consultants, 2300 N. St N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037.

Cost Analysis

Braithwaite, A., and E. Samakh. 1998. The cost-to-serve method. International Journal of Business Logistics 9(1): 69–84.


La Londe, B.J. 1998. The costs of "functional shiftability." Supply Chain Management Review 34(1): 9–10.

e-Commerce

Gross, N. 1998. The supply chain: leapfrogging a few links. Business Week 3583: 140–142.


Mottley, R. 1998. Spinning supply chains via the Internet. American Shipper 40(11): 26–28.

Information Technology Integration and Enterprise Resource Planning

Appleton, E.L. 1997. Supply chain brain. CFO 13(7): 51–54.


Bundy, W. 1999. Leveraging technology for speed and reliability. Supply Chain Management Review 35(2): 62–69.

Buxbaum, P. 1998. Technology tightens links in supply chain. Transport Topics 3308: 12–14.

CASE STUDIES

Industry

Brunell, T. 1999. Managing a multicompany supply chain. Supply Chain Management Review 35(2): 45–52.


Simison, R.L. 1997. New data illustrates reshaping of auto parts business: firm's makeover reflects car industry's assigning more assembly to suppliers. Wall Street Journal, September 2, 1997.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

Stein T., and J. Sweat. 1998. Killer supply chains. Information Week 708: 36–46.

Retail and Wholesale

Hoffman," K.C. 1999. Elizabeth Arden's supply chain gets dramatic facelift. Global Sites and Logistics 3(1): 20–28.


Lampe, J., and R.W. Gray. 1998. The Bridgestone/ Firestone perspective: betting on the supply chain. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 24–30.


Reuland, T. 1999. Thomson Consumer Electronics: listening to the customer's voice. Supply Chain Management Review 35(1): 28–34.

Global Supply Chain

Fites, D.V. 1996. Make your dealers your partners. Harvard Business Review 74(2): 84–95.


Harrington, L.H. 1999. The high tech sector: meeting supply challenges at warp speed. Transportation and Distribution 40(3): 49–53.

Hoyt, J.B. 1998. Lessons learned on a supply chain journey. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 84–92.


Margerita, J. 1998. Fast, global, and entrepreneurial: supply chain management, Hong Kong Style. An interview with Victor Fung. Harvard Business Review 76(5): 103–114.

McIntyre, K., H.A. Smith, A. Henham, and J. Pretlove. 1998. Logistics performance measurement and greening supply chains: diverging mindsets. International Journal of Logistics Management 9(1): 57–68.


Scharlacken, J.W. 1998. The seven pillars of global supply chain planning. Supply Chain Management Review 34(2): 32–40.

Manufacturing

John, C.G., and M. Willis. 1998. Supply chain re-engineering at Anheuser-Busch. Supply Chain Management Review 34(4): 28–36.

Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 137
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 138
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 140
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The managed flow of goods and information from raw material to final sale also known as a "supply chain" affects everything--from the U.S. gross domestic product to where you can buy your jeans. The nature of a company's supply chain has a significant effect on its success or failure--as in the success of Dell Computer's make-to-order system and the failure of General Motor's vertical integration during the 1998 United Auto Workers strike.

Supply Chain Integration looks at this crucial component of business at a time when product design, manufacture, and delivery are changing radically and globally. This book explores the benefits of continuously improving the relationship between the firm, its suppliers, and its customers to ensure the highest added value.

This book identifies the state-of-the-art developments that contribute to the success of vertical tiers of suppliers and relates these developments to the capabilities that small and medium-sized manufacturers must have to be viable participants in this system. Strategies for attaining these capabilities through manufacturing extension centers and other technical assistance providers at the national, state, and local level are suggested.

This book identifies action steps for small and medium-sized manufacturers--the "seed corn" of business start-up and development--to improve supply chain management. The book examines supply chain models from consultant firms, universities, manufacturers, and associations. Topics include the roles of suppliers and other supply chain participants, the rise of outsourcing, the importance of information management, the natural tension between buyer and seller, sources of assistance to small and medium-sized firms, and a host of other issues.

Supply Chain Integration will be of interest to industry policymakers, economists, researchers, business leaders, and forward-thinking executives.

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