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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Example Stakeholder Responsibilities and Opportunities." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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C

Example Stakeholder Responsibilities and Opportunities

Organization HIT-Related Activities
Federal agencies
Health and Human Services:
     ONC Coordinate federal efforts in HIT adoption and use
     AHRQ Program management, content development, communication
     CDC Public health monitoring/population health improvement
     CMS Implement HIT to reduce costs and improve quality of care
     FDA Postmarket drug/device surveillance; data reuse
     HRSA Improve access/coordination for underserved populations
     NIH Collaborative research and rapid translation from study to clinic
Other departments:
     Commerce/NIST Standards and interoperability
     DOD/Health Affairs Telehealth research and design, patient care system
     FCC National Broadband Plan
     NSF Fund digital infrastructure research and development
     Veterans Affairs/VHA EHR/PHR system design and use for patient care and research
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Example Stakeholder Responsibilities and Opportunities." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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Organization HIT-Related Activities
IT Companies—e.g., Allscripts, Epic, Cerner, GE, Google, Microsoft, Dossia Software systems supporting integrated clinical and business functions and patient portals
Healthcare delivery—e.g., Geisinger, Kaiser Permanente, Virginia Mason, Group Health Cooperative, Mayo, Partners HealthCare Use of digital capacity to improve patient care, increase patient involvement, and speed research insights
Academic medical centers—e.g., Duke, MD Anderson, Vanderbilt Use of digital capacity to speed research insights from clinical care and apply research findings to improve clinical care
Cooperation capacity resources—e.g., ACOs, HMORN, PEDSNET Implementation and use of data sharing and distributed datasets
Stakeholder organizations—e.g., ACP, ACC, AMIA, eHI, NeHC, NPWC, STS Advance stakeholder interest in HIT system development and use
Independent sector—e.g., CDISC, CHcF, Markle, NCQA, NQF, RWJF Funding and facilitating innovation in the HIT field
NOTE: Sample list, neither definitive nor complete. See page xxiii for list of acronyms.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Example Stakeholder Responsibilities and Opportunities." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
×
Page 277
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Example Stakeholder Responsibilities and Opportunities." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Digital Infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The Foundation for Continuous Improvement in Health and Health Care: Workshop Series Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12912.
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Page 278
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Like many other industries, health care is increasingly turning to digital information and the use of electronic resources. The Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care hosted three workshops to explore current efforts and opportunities to accelerate progress in improving health and health care with information technology systems.

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