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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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EVALUATION

DESIGN

FOR COMPLEX

GLOBAL

INITIATIVES

WORKSHOP SUMMARY

Steve Olson, Rapporteur

Board on Global Health

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
        OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS   500 Fifth Street, NW   Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The workshop that is the subject of this workshop summary was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

This activity was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The views presented in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the activity.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-30258-6
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-30258-7

Additional copies of this workshop summary are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu.

For more information about the Institute of Medicine, visit the IOM home page at: www.iom.edu.

Copyright 2014 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost all cultures and religions since the beginning of recorded history. The serpent adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the Staatliche Museen in Berlin.

Suggested citation: IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2014. Evaluation design for complex global initiatives: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Knowing is not enough; we must apply.
Willing is not enough; we must do.
”      

                                                —Goethe

image

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
              OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advising the Nation. Improving Health.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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PLANNING COMMITTEE FOR THE WORKSHOP ON
EVALUATING LARGE-SCALE, COMPLEX,
MULTI-NATIONAL GLOBAL HEALTH INITIATIVES1

ANN KURTH (Chair), New York University, New York, NY

GEORGE ALLEYNE, Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC

KARA HANSON, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

DOROTHY MUROKI, FHI 360, Nairobi, Kenya

JONATHON SIMON, Boston University, Boston, MA

MARTIN VAESSEN, ICF International, Rockville, MD

IOM Staff

BRIDGET B. KELLY, Project Co-Director

KIMBERLY A. SCOTT, Project Co-Director

KATE MECK, Associate Program Officer

CHARLEE ALEXANDER, Senior Program Assistant (from November 2013)

JULIE WILTSHIRE, Financial Officer

PATRICK W. KELLEY, Senior Board Director, Board on Global Health


1 Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteur and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Reviewers

This workshop summary has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published workshop summary as sound as possible and to ensure that the workshop summary meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this workshop summary:

RICHARD BERK, University of Pennsylvania

ANN KURTH, New York University

DOROTHY MUROKI, FHI 360,

SANJEEV SRIDHARAN, University of Toronto

HOWARD WHITE, International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they did not see the final draft of the workshop summary before its release. The review of this workshop summary was overseen by Enriqueta Bond, President Emeritus, Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Appointed by the Institute of Medicine, she was responsible for

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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making certain that an independent examination of this workshop summary was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this workshop summary rests entirely with the rapporteur and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
×

Acknowledgments

The planning committee and project staff deeply appreciate many valuable contributions from individuals who assisted us with this project. First, we offer our profound thanks to all of the presenters and discussants at the workshop, who gave so generously of their time and expertise. These individuals are listed in full in the workshop agenda in Appendix B. We are also grateful to the many participants who attended the workshop both in person and via the live webcast. The engagement of all those in attendance was robust and vital to the success of the event. We are also particularly appreciative of the thoughtful and creative contributions of Mary Ellen Kelly and James Kelly, who applied their many years of experience to help generate the fictional initiative used for the hypothetical design exercise at the workshop.

In addition, we thank the sponsors of this project for their support: the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. We are also grateful to the Wellcome Trust for hosting the workshop, with a special thanks to Zoe Storey, Danielle Taplin, and all of the staff there for their gracious assistance in support of every aspect of the event. We also extend many thanks to Anthony Mavrogiannis and the staff at Kentlands Travel for supporting the travel needs and requirements of this project. We appreciate LeAnn Locher’s creative work in designing the report cover. Finally, we convey our gratitude for the hard work of the many staff of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academies who supported the project at every stage, from its inception to the workshop to the final production of this workshop summary report.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18739.
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Every year, public and private funders spend many billions of dollars on large-scale, complex, multi-national health initiatives. The only way to know whether these initiatives are achieving their objectives is through evaluations that examine the links between program activities and desired outcomes. Investments in such evaluations, which, like the initiatives being evaluated, are carried out in some of the world's most challenging settings, are a relatively new phenomenon. In the last five years, evaluations have been conducted to determine the effects of some of the world's largest and most complex multi-national health initiatives.

Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine in January 2014 to explore these recent evaluation experiences and to consider the lessons learned from how these evaluations were designed, carried out, and used. The workshop brought together more than 100 evaluators, researchers in the field of evaluation science, staff involved in implementing large-scale health programs, local stakeholders in the countries where the initiatives are carried out, policy makers involved in the initiatives, representatives of donor organizations, and others to derive lessons learned from past large-scale evaluations and to discuss how to apply these lessons to future evaluations. This report discusses transferable insights gained across the spectrum of choosing the evaluator, framing the evaluation, designing the evaluation, gathering and analyzing data, synthesizing findings and recommendations, and communicating key messages. The report also explores the relative benefits and limitations of different quantitative and qualitative approaches within the mixed methods designs used for these complex and costly evaluations.

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