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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
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Appendix D

Workshop Agenda and Attendees

WORKSHOP AGENDA

National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W. Washington, DC 20418

Day 1: May 28, 2014
8:00AM Arrival and registration
(Breakfast will be provided for committee and panelists)
 
8:30AM SESSION 1: WELCOME AND OPENING PRESENTATION
Introduction to the goals and context of the workshop
Committee Chair:

Tom Connelly
Executive Vice President & Chief Innovation Officer, DuPont

 
9:00AM KEYNOTE: Achievements and Future Promise

Doug Cameron
Co-President and Director, First Green Partners

 
9:45AM SESSION 2: PERSPECTIVES ON CHEMICAL INDUSTRY PROCESS
Panel Moderator:

Lionel Clarke
Co-Chair, UK Synthetic Biology Leadership Council

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • What are the main drivers for adoption of bio-based processes in industry now and in the future?
  • What are the main lessons from recent experience in developing industrial (bio) processes?
  • How may feedstock options evolve and impact the supply chain?
  • How might the adoption of bio-based processes change the nature of the chemical and energy industries?
  • What are the particular considerations for commodity versus specialty chemicals?
  • What are the greatest barriers to process development and what is most needed to overcome them?
 

Markus Pompejus
Head of Research, Bioactive Materials and Biotechnology, BASF
Mark Burk
Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Genomatica
Guo-ping Zhao
Director, Laboratory of Synthetic Biology, Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology (IPPE), Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS)
Jennifer Holmgren
Chief Executive Officer, LanzaTech

 

Panel discussion: ~45 min

 
11:30AM Lunch (Lunch will be provided for committee and panelists)
 
12:30PM SESSION 3 : TECHNICAL CHALLENGES IN SAFETY AND BIOCONTAINMENT
Panel Moderator:

Pilar Ossorio
Professor of Law and Bioethics, University of Wisconsin Law School, Madison

Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • How should we characterize, measure, and minimize the different types of risks that could arise from different types of industrial biology (production of commodity chemicals vs. “fine chemicals”)?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
  • What types of risks might be shared across a variety of different types of chemical production?
  • Are traditional risk assessment approaches adequate for understanding and responding to risks posed by biological production of commodity chemicals and “fine chemicals”?
  • Into what existing risk regulation and governance frameworks will different types of industrial biology fall?
  • What factors will influence the ways various publics understand the risks and uncertainties associated with biological chemical production?
  • How do we communicate the risks and uncertainties of continuing on the course of traditional chemical production (i.e., there may be risks to doing something new, but there are also environmental and health risks to doing the same old thing)?
  • Given that risks cannot be reduced to zero, and attempting to do so could be counterproductive and unjustifiably expensive, how do we develop systems that can quickly identify and appropriately mitigate adverse events when they do occur?
 

Mark Segal
Senior Microbiologist, Risk Assessment Division (RAD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Eleonore Pauwels
Program Associate, Science and Technology Innovation Program, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Dietram Scheufele
John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Ed You
Special Agent, WMD Directorate, Federal Bureau of Investigation

 
Panel discussion: ~30 min
 
2:00PM Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
2:15PM SESSION 4: SYNTHESIS AND GENOME-SCALE ENGINEERING
Panel Moderator:

Andy Ellington
Wilson M. and Kathryn Fraser Research Professor in Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin
Chris Voigt
Associate Professor of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • How do we coordinate system design (parts, genes, regulation) with whole genome engineering methods, including random and directed DNA changes?
  • How can we measure the impact of synthetic genetics on the host, insulate these effects, and use genome-wide information to inform the design process?
  • Can we utilize part interactions with the host as part of the design, or is there a push toward ever more orthogonal systems?
  • To what extent are programmed genomic interventions of any sort likely to undergo further modification as a result of selection? Can we make interventions that are robust to changes in environment and evolution?
 

Todd Peterson
Chief Technology Officer, Synthetic Genomics Inc.
Jennifer Doudna
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley
Harris Wang
Assistant Professor in Systems Biology, Columbia University
Timothy Lu
Associate Professor of Biological Engineering and Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 
Panel discussion: ~30 min
 
3:45PM SESSION 5: MEASURMENT (OF ENGINEERED ORGANISMS, PATHWAYS, SYSTEMS)
Panel Moderator:

Steve Laderman
Director, Molecular Tools Laboratory, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • What role does in vitro and in vivo measurement play today in pursuing the science, technology, and practice of synthetic biology?
  • What are the primary methods used today?
  • What do you see as the most promising emerging in vitro and in vivo measurement methods?
  • What gaps in sample handling, measurement methods, data analysis and interpretation, and/or standards will still remain compared to what is desirable?
  • What breakthroughs would be needed to close those gaps?
  • What research would be needed to achieve those breakthroughs?
  • What would be the benefits? What would that future state look like?
 

Drew Endy
Associate Professor, Stanford University
John McLean
Stevenson Associate Professor of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University
Johnathan Sweedler
James R. Eiszner Family Chair in Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Marc Salit
Leader, Genome Scale Measurements Group, NIST Material Measurement Laboratory

 
Panel discussion: ~30 min
 
5:15PM OVERVIEW FOR TOMORROW
Committee Chair:

Tom Connelly
Executive Vice President & Chief Innovation Officer, DuPont

 
5:30PM Adjourn for Day
 
6:00PM Committee will reconvene for closed session discussion over dinner
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Day 2: May 29, 2014
 
8:00AM (Breakfast will be provided for committee and panelists)
 
8:30AM DAY 2 WELCOME AND OPENING PRESENTATION:
Committee Chair:

Tom Connelly
Executive Vice President & Chief Innovation Officer, DuPont

 
8:45AM SESSION 6: COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN, MANUFACTURING, AND TESTING
Panel Moderator:

Nathan Hillson
Biochemist Staff Scientist, Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • What are the bottlenecks to integrating the diaspora of bioinformatics tools and biological knowledge into a coherent industrially relevant workflow (e.g., not invented here syndrome, software licensing, software documentation, unaligned incentive structures, data structure standardization)?
  • What are the current hurdles to the development of predictive genome-scale metabolic models that are accurate under industrially relevant conditions (e.g., sufficiently detailed comprehensive experimental measurements, non-steady-state mathematical frameworks, lack of fundamental biological knowledge)?
  • Are there specific technical/knowledge/infrastructure challenges that, if overcome, would dramatically improve the chemical space accessible to retrosynthetic design and the accuracy thereof?
  • In a world where any biological analytical measurement can be readily output in DNA (sequencing readout only required, no mass-spec, etc.), and there is a deluge of test data, what would be the resulting bottlenecks and infrastructure challenges?
 

Eric Klavins
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×

Bernhard Palsson
Galletti Professor of Bioengineering, Professor of Pediatrics, and Principal Investigator of the Systems Biology Research Group, University of California, San Diego
Chris Anderson
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley
Sriram Kosuri
Assistant Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

 
Panel discussion: ~30 minutes
 
10:15AM Break
 
10:30AM SESSION 7: ADVANCED MOLECULES—WHAT DOES THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?
Panel Moderator:
 

Kristala Jones Prather
Theodore Miller Career Development Associate Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 
Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • How can we expand the range of molecules and/or materials that can be industrially produced through biology?
  • How do we/can we significantly increase the range of elements incorporated into biologically produced chemicals beyond carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen?
  • What new methods are required for pathway discovery and design, enzyme discovery and design, and implementation to bring these new molecules/materials to market?
 

Michelle Chang
Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
Jeffrey Moore
Senior Investigator, Process Research, Merck and Company, Inc.
Mike Jewett
Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University

 
Panel discussion: ~30 min
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
12:15PM Lunch (Lunch will be provided for committee and panelists)
 
1:00PM SESSION 8: SCALE UP AND SCALE OUT
Panel Moderator:
 

Huimin Zhao
Professor and Centennial Endowed Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 
Panel Objectives/Key Questions:
  • Process scale-up and scale-out are critical aspects of commercializing industrial processes for production of chemicals and fuels. In this panel, we will highlight several case studies such as the large-scale production of 1,3-propanediol, and 3-hydroxypropionic acid and discuss the key challenging issues in process scale-up and scale-out.
  • What are the key lessons we learned from the few successful case studies?
  • What are the key challenging issues in process scale-up and scale-out?
  • How can we ensure the engineered organisms will behave similarly under large-scale process conditions as in small-scale laboratory conditions?
  • How does technoeconomic analysis help process scale-up and scale-out?
 

Bill Provine
Director of Science & Technology External Affairs, DuPont
Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor, Michigan State University
Joel Cherry
President, Research & Development, Amyris

 
Panel discussion: ~30 min
 
2:30PM Final Discussion and Closing Remarks
 
3:00PM Adjourn Workshop
 
3:15PM Committee will meet for 2 hrs in closed session
 
5:30PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×

WORKSHOP ATTENDEES

Committee Members

Michelle Chang, University of California, Berkeley

Lionel Clarke, UK Synthetic Biology Leadership Council

Thomas Connelly, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company

Andrew Ellington, University of Texas at Austin

Nathan Hillson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Richard Johnson, Global Helix LLC

Stephen Laderman, Agilent Technologies, Inc.

Pillar Ossorio, University of Wisconsin Law School, Madison

Kristala Prather, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Christopher Voigt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Huimin Zhao, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Speakers

Chris Anderson, University of California, Berkeley

Henry Bryndza, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company

Mark Burk, Genomatica

Doug Cameron, First Green Partners

Joel Cherry, Amyris

Parag Chitnis, National Science Foundation

Bruce Dale, Michigan State University

Jennifer Doudna, Howard Hughes Medical Institute/UCB

Jennifer Holmgren, LanzaTech

Mike Jewett, Northwestern University

Eric Klavin, University of Washington

Sriram Kosuri, University of California, Los Angeles

Tim Lu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

John McLean, Vanderbilt University

Jeffrey Moore, Merck & Co.

Bernhard Palsson, University of California, San Diego

Eleonore Pauwels, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Todd Peterson, Synthetic Genomics, Inc

Markus Pompejus, BASF Corporation

William Provine, E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company

Marc Salit, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Dietram Scheufele, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Mark Segal, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Jonathan Sweedler, University of Illinois

Harris Wang, Columbia University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×

Edward You, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Guo-ping Zhao, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS)

Participants

Jamie Bacher, Pareto Biotechnologies

Lynn Bergeson, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

Randall Dimond, Promega Corporation

Jay Fitzgerald, U.S. Department of Energy BER/AAAS

Barbara Gerratana, National Institute of General Medical Sciences/NIH

Theresa Good, National Science Foundation

Joseph Graber, U.S. Department of Energy

Ellen Jorgensen, Genspace NYC Inc.

Devin Leake, Gen9

Malin Young, Sandia National Labs

Dagmar Ringe, National Science Foundation

David Rockcliffe, National Science Foundation

David Ross, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Emily Tipaldo, American Chemistry Council

Walter Valdivia, The Brookings Institution

Susanne von Bodman, National Science Foundation

Kate Von Holle, University of Chicago

Megan Weinshank, BASF

Malin Young, Sandia National Labs

NRC Staff

Douglas Friedman, Senior Program Officer, Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology

India Hook-Barnard, Senior Program Officer, Board on Life Sciences

Carl Anderson, Research Associate, Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology

Nawina Matshona, Senior Program Assistant, Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology

Lauren Soni, Senior Program Assistant, Board on Life Sciences

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 146
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 148
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda and Attendees." National Research Council. 2015. Industrialization of Biology: A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19001.
×
Page 150
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The tremendous progress in biology over the last half century - from Watson and Crick's elucidation of the structure of DNA to today's astonishing, rapid progress in the field of synthetic biology - has positioned us for significant innovation in chemical production. New bio-based chemicals, improved public health through improved drugs and diagnostics, and biofuels that reduce our dependency on oil are all results of research and innovation in the biological sciences. In the past decade, we have witnessed major advances made possible by biotechnology in areas such as rapid, low-cost DNA sequencing, metabolic engineering, and high-throughput screening. The manufacturing of chemicals using biological synthesis and engineering could expand even faster. A proactive strategy - implemented through the development of a technical roadmap similar to those that enabled sustained growth in the semiconductor industry and our explorations of space - is needed if we are to realize the widespread benefits of accelerating the industrialization of biology.

Industrialization of Biology presents such a roadmap to achieve key technical milestones for chemical manufacturing through biological routes. This report examines the technical, economic, and societal factors that limit the adoption of bioprocessing in the chemical industry today and which, if surmounted, would markedly accelerate the advanced manufacturing of chemicals via industrial biotechnology. Working at the interface of synthetic chemistry, metabolic engineering, molecular biology, and synthetic biology, Industrialization of Biology identifies key technical goals for next-generation chemical manufacturing, then identifies the gaps in knowledge, tools, techniques, and systems required to meet those goals, and targets and timelines for achieving them. This report also considers the skills necessary to accomplish the roadmap goals, and what training opportunities are required to produce the cadre of skilled scientists and engineers needed.

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