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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
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Appendix D

Acronyms

ADS Accelerator-driven system
AECL Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
AFIP ATR full-size plate in center flux trap position
ANL Argonne National Laboratory
ATR Advanced Test Reactor
ATR-C Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility
ATR NSUF Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility
BWXT Babcock and Wilcox Technologies
BR2 Belgian Reactor II (SCK·CEN, Mol, Belgium)
CA Critical assemblies
CEA Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives
CEFR China Experimental Fast Reactor
CERCA Compagnie pour l’Etude et la Réalisation de Combustibles Atomiques
CFR Code of Federal Regulations
CIAE China Institute of Atomic Energy
cm Centimeter
CNEA Argentine National Commission of Atomic Energy
CNL Canadian Nuclear Laboratories
CP-1 Chicago Pile-1
DOE U.S. Department of Energy
 
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
DPRK Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
ESS European Spallation Source
FD Fuel development
FDP Fuel Data Provider (see Appendix E)
FFA Federal facility agreement
FFC Fuel fabrication capability
FMWG Fissile Material Working Group
FNR Ford Nuclear Reactor
FP-1 and FP-2 Full-sized fuel plate test-1 and test-2
FRM-II Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-II
FY Fiscal year
GE General Electric
GE-NTR General Electric Nuclear Test Reactor
GTRI Global Threat Reduction Initiative
GTRP Global Threat Reduction Program
HAMP HANARO Mini-Plate
HANARO High-Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (Deokjin-dong)
HERACLES Highly enriched European Reactors Action for their Conversion in a Low Enriched Solution
HEU Highly enriched uranium
HFIR High Flux Isotope Reactor (Oak Ridge)
HFR High Flux Reactor (Petten)
HPRR High performance research reactor
HT3R High-Temperature Teaching & Test Reactor
IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency
IB Ice breaker
IBR2M Induced Bed Reactor–2M
ID Identification (See Appendix F)
IGORR International Group on Research Reactors
IL Interaction layer
ILL Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble)
in. Inch
INFCE International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation
INL Idaho National Laboratory
INVO Iraq Nuclear Verification Office
IPFM International Panel on Fissile Materials
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
IRE Institute for Radio Elements
IREN Intense Resonance Neutron pulsed source
IRIS International Reactor Innovative and Secure
IRT In-Reactor Thimble (Fast Test Reactor)/Iraqi Reactor
ISR Independent strategic review
IVV Water-cooled, water-moderated (Russian acronym)
JHR Jules Horowitz Reactor (CEA-Cadarache)
JMTR Japan Materials Testing Reactor (Oarai)
JSC “SSC RIAR” Joint Stock Company State Scientific Center—Research Institute of Atomic Reactors
KAERI Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute
kg Kilogram
KJRR Ki-Jang Research Reactor
km/s Kilometer per second
KUCA Kyoto University Critical Assembly
kW Kilowatt
LEONIDAS Low Enriched Option Network Initiative for the Development of a European Appropriate Solution
LEU Low enriched uranium
LITR Low-intensity testing reactor
µm Micrometer
M3 Material Management and Minimization (“M-cubed”), also MMM
MBIR Multipurpose sodium-cooled fast neutron research reactor (Russian acronym)
MIR Modernized international reactor
MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MITR-II Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (Boston)
MNSR Miniature Neutron Source Reactor
MOX Mixed oxide fuel
MP Mini-plate
MTR Materials test reactors
MURR University of Missouri Research Reactor (Columbia)
MW Megawatts
MYRRHA Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications
N/A Not applicable
NAA Neutron activation analysis
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
NAS National Academy of Sciences, now the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
NBSR Neutron Beam Split-core Reactor
NCBJ Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (National Center for Nuclear Research)
NCCP Novosibirsk Chemical Concentrates Plant
NCNR NIST Center for Neutron Research
NIKIET Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (Nauchno-issledovatel’skii institut energotekhniki)
NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology
NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration
NRG Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group
NSC National Security Council
NSS Nuclear Security Summit
NSUF Nuclear Science User Facility
NTD Neutron transmutation doping
NTI Nuclear Threat Initiative
NV Naval reactor
OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory
ORR Oak Ridge Research Reactor
OSTP Office of Science and Technology Policy
PIE Post-irradiation examination
PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
PR Pulsed reactor
PVD Physical vapor deposition
RAS Russian Academy of Sciences
RERTR Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors
RHF Réacteur à Haut Flux (Grenoble)
RIAR Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad)
RR Research reactor
RRDB Research Reactor Database
RRFM European Research Reactor and Fuel Management Conference
RRRFR Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (Program)
SAFARI South African Fundamental Atomic Research Installation
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
SCK·CEN Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie·Centre d’Etudes Nucléaire
SLOWPOKE Safe Low-Power Kritical Experiment
SNS Spallation Neutron Source
SS Steady-state reactor
TAPIRO TAratura PIla Rapida a potenza 0
TEM Transmission electron microscopy
TOUTATIS Traitement Optimisé de l’Uranium et Thermique Améliorée pour une Technologie Intégrant la Sûreté
TREAT Transient Reactor Test Facility
TRIGA Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics
TUM Technische Universität München
U.K. United Kingdom
UM University of Michigan
USNRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
U.S. United States
USHPRR U.S. high performance research reactor
VENUS Vulcan Experimental Nuclear Study
VIC Vienna International Center
VNIIEF All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Vsesoyuznyy nauchnoissledovatel’skiy institut eksperimental’noy fiziki)
vol. Volume
W Watt
W-HEU Weapon-grade highly enriched uranium
wt Weight
Y-12 Y-12 National Security Complex
YTC Years to conversion
ZPTF Zero Power Test Facility
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 155
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 156
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 157
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21818.
×
Page 158
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The continued presence of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian installations such as research reactors poses a threat to national and international security. Minimization, and ultimately elimination, of HEU in civilian research reactors worldwide has been a goal of U.S. policy and programs since 1978. Today, 74 civilian research reactors around the world, including 8 in the United States, use or are planning to use HEU fuel. Since the last National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report on this topic in 2009, 28 reactors have been either shut down or converted from HEU to low enriched uranium fuel. Despite this progress, the large number of remaining HEU-fueled reactors demonstrates that an HEU minimization program continues to be needed on a worldwide scale. Reducing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Civilian Research Reactors assesses the status of and progress toward eliminating the worldwide use of HEU fuel in civilian research and test reactors.

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