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Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Suggested Citation:"Summary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22926.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

S U M M A R Y This report presents draft guidebook research and findings for Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Project 03-06. The objective of this project is to provide a comprehensive guidebook for airport staff at all levels for planning and implementing automated people mover (APM) systems at airports. The development of this guidebook is premised on the fact that with the continued growth in air travel, airports have increased in size and complexity, but the increased dis- tances between activity centers have made them less walkable. The implementation of APMs, however, has allowed both passengers and employees, along with their luggage, wheelchairs, and other accessories, to travel long distances quickly and efficiently. Due to the time sensi- tivity of air travel, many airports have recognized the importance of passenger mobility and have implemented these APM systems. APMs are fully automated and driverless transit systems that operate on fixed guideways in exclusive rights-of-way. They are not subject to congestion or interference from other types of traffic. An APM system is a combination of interrelated subsystems and elements designed to operate as a cohesive entity that provides safe, reliable, and efficient passenger transport. A full description of the APM technology, including the subsystems that comprise it, is provided in Chapter 4. The findings of the guidebook can be summarized as follows: • Developed initially for urban use, APMs have primarily been implemented at major airports around the world. Ease of boarding and capacity flexibility are key reasons the technology has been implemented at 44 airports to date. • Airside APMs have allowed airports to expand in terms of distance between facilities and the numbers of aircraft gates while still maintaining service thresholds. This has contributed to the success of large airline hubbing operations. • Landside APMs have reduced airport roadway congestion and emissions and have enabled large-scale airline hubbing operations (connecting separate landside terminals) and con- venient connections to landside facilities such as parking and rental car facilities and ground transport centers. With additional APMs opening in late 2009 and early 2010, it is clear that APMs continue to be an appropriate passenger conveyance mode for airports. Looking to the future, there are areas of research that would benefit the airport planner with respect APMs, including: • Sustainable planning practices for new and existing APM systems, and • Incorporation of the latest advances of the automated conveyance technology personal rapid transit (PRT) into the planning and implementation of APMs. Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports 1

2The guidebook also includes an interactive CD that contains a database of detailed char- acteristics of the 44 existing APM systems. Using this database, planners and designers can evaluate specific options appropriate for new projects by comparing similar situations already in operation. This additional information will help in implementing the guidance provided in this document.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 37: Guidebook for Planning and Implementing Automated People Mover Systems at Airports includes guidance for planning and developing automated people mover (APM) systems at airports. The guidance in the report encompasses the planning and decision-making process, alternative system infrastructure and technologies, evaluation techniques and strategies, operation and maintenance requirements, coordination and procurement requirements, and other planning and development issues.

The guidebook includes an interactive CD that contains a database of detailed characteristics of the 44 existing APM systems. The CD is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

Download the .ISO CD-ROM Image

In March 2012, TRB released ACRP Report 37A: Guidebook for Measuring Performance of Automated People Mover Systems at Airports as a companion to ACRP Report 37. ACRP Report 37A is designed to help measure the performance of automated people mover (APM) systems at airports.

In June 2012, TRB released ACRP Report 67: Airport Passenger Conveyance Systems Planning Guidebook that offers guidance on the planning and implementation of passenger conveyance systems at airports.

(Warning: This is a large file that may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

Disclaimer: The CD-ROM is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively “TRB’) be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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