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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
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Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

Workshop on the Health Risks of
Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter

500 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2016

8:30 a.m. Welcome, Workshop Goals, and Introductions
William Nazaroff, Ph.D., Chair
8:40 a.m. Sponsor Remarks
David Rowson, M.S.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
9:00 a.m. SESSION I: SOURCES OF INDOOR PARTICULATE MATTER
Moderated by: William Nazaroff, Ph.D.
Outdoor Air and Appliances as Sources of Indoor Particulate Matter
Brent Stephens, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology
Indoor Sources of Airborne Allergens and Smoke
Lynn M. Hildemann, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Surrounded by a Cloud of Dust: Particle Resuspension in Indoor Environments
Brandon E. Boor, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Purdue University
10:30 a.m. Break
10:45 a.m. SESSION II: PARTICLE DYNAMICS AND CHEMISTRY
Moderated by: Richard Corsi, Ph.D., P.E.
Indoor Chemistry and Aerosols
Glenn Morrison, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology
Dynamics of Particle Size and Concentration Indoors: A Building Science Perspective
Jeffrey Siegel, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto
Composition of Indoor PM, Including the Influence of SVOC Partitioning
Charles Weschler, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor, Rutgers University; Visiting Professor, Technical University of Denmark and Tsinghua University
12:15 p.m. Lunch
1:15 p.m. SESSION III: EXPOSURE LEVELS AND CHARACTERIZATION
Moderated by: Terry Brennan, M.S.
Fine PM Exposure Characterization Provides Insights into Sources and Transformations
Barbara Turpin, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Some Determinants of Indoor Concentrations and Exposures to Particulate Matter
Roy Harrison, Ph.D., D.Sc. (presenting via web conference)
Queen Elizabeth II Birmingham Centenary Professor of Environmental Health, University of Birmingham
Socioeconomic Determinants of Indoor PM Exposure: Understanding Sources, Structures and Settings
Gary Adamkiewicz, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Assistant Professor of Environmental Health and Exposure Disparities, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
2:45 p.m. Break
3:00 p.m. SESSION IV: EXPOSURE MITIGATION
Moderated by: Tiina Reponen, Ph.D.
Indoor Particle Mitigation with Filtration
William Fisk, M.S.
Senior Scientist, Indoor Environment Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Methods and Approaches for Controlling Exposure to Biological Aerosols
Sergey A. Grinshpun, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Indoor PM Exposure Mitigation in Low-Socioeconomic Status Households
Brett C. Singer, Ph.D.
Staff Scientist, Residential Building Systems, Indoor Environment Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
4:30 p.m. General Discussion and Summary
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2016

8:30 a.m. Welcome
William Nazaroff, Ph.D., Chair
8:35 a.m. SESSION V: IDENTIFIED AND EMERGING HEALTH CONCERNS
Moderated by: Howard Kipen, M.D., M.P.H.
Indoor Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Health
Ryan Allen, Ph.D. (presenting via web conference) Associate Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University
Ambient Particulate Matter (PM) Air Pollution and Adverse Birth Outcomes: Targets for Studies on Health Effects of Indoor PM
David Rich, Sc.D., M.P.H.
Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center
Particulate Matter Air Pollution: Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders
Marc Weisskopf, Ph.D., Sc.D.
Associate Professor of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
10:05 a.m. Break
10:20 a.m. SESSION VI: INTERVENTIONS AND RISK COMMUNICATION
Moderated by: William Nazaroff, Ph.D.
The Challenge of Communicating Indoor PM Risk
George Gray, Ph.D.
Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Empowering People to Reduce Indoor Exposures to Particulate Matter: What Can We Learn from Communicating About Other Health Risks?
William K. Hallman, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair, Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers University
Public Understanding and Information Seeking Related to Indoor PM Risk: The Need for a Benchmark Study
Lee Ann Kahlor, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Stan Richards School of Advertising, The University of Texas at Austin
11:50 a.m. Closing Remarks
William Nazaroff, Ph.D., Chair
12:00 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Page 124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Page 125
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Page 126
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines PM as a mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets comprising a number of components, including “acids (such as nitrates and sulfates), organic chemicals, metals, soil or dust particles, and allergens (such as fragments of pollen and mold spores)”. The health effects of outdoor exposure to particulate matter (PM) are the subject of both research attention and regulatory action. Although much less studied to date, indoor exposure to PM is gaining attention as a potential source of adverse health effects. Indoor PM can originate from outdoor particles and also from various indoor sources, including heating, cooking, and smoking. Levels of indoor PM have the potential to exceed outdoor PM levels.

Understanding the major features and subtleties of indoor exposures to particles of outdoor origin can improve our understanding of the exposure–response relationship on which ambient air pollutant standards are based. The EPA’s Indoor Environments Division commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to hold a workshop examining the issue of indoor exposure to PM more comprehensively and considering both the health risks and possible intervention strategies. Participants discussed the ailments that are most affected by particulate matter and the attributes of the exposures that are of greatest concern, exposure modifiers, vulnerable populations, exposure assessment, risk management, and gaps in the science. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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