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Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
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Appendix B

Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers

Gary Adamkiewicz, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of environmental health and exposure disparities at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where much of his work focuses on the connections between housing and health and on understanding disparities in environmental exposure. His research has included studies of indoor environmental conditions within the homes of children with asthma and studies that aim to understand the factors that contribute to specific exposures such as pesticides and other chemicals, allergens, secondhand smoke, particulate matter, and other combustion by-products. He has worked with national, state, and local agencies on projects that aim to reduce the burden of disease from indoor environmental issues. Dr. Adamkiewicz is a member of the Science Advisory Committee for the National Center for Healthy Housing and has served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Justice Technical Guidance Review Panel, under the auspices of the agency’s Science Advisory Board. He has also served as an advisor to the World Health Organization’s effort to establish indoor air quality guidelines. He also serves as the Healthy Cities Program Leader at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment. In 2012 the American Journal of Public Health awarded Dr. Adamkiewicz a Paper of the Year honor for his work on housing as an environmental justice issue. Dr. Adamkiewicz holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.P.H. from Harvard.

Ryan Allen, Ph.D., is an associate professor of environmental health in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He holds a master’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

degree in environmental engineering and a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences, both from the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Allen completed a postdoctoral training in environmental epidemiology as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–funded MESA Air study, which focused on the link between long-term air pollution exposure and the progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Dr. Allen’s current research focuses include air pollution exposure assessment methods, the cardiovascular effects of air pollution, the evaluation of interventions to reduce air pollution exposures and health effects, and the impacts of early-life air pollution exposure on childhood growth and development. In 2010 Dr. Allen was awarded the Joan M. Daisey Outstanding Young Scientist Award by the International Society of Exposure Science.

Brandon E. Boor, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering (by courtesy) at Purdue University. He leads the Indoor Aerosol and Exposure Laboratory at Purdue and is a member of the Center for High Performance Buildings at the Ray W. Herrick Laboratories. Dr. Boor’s research focuses on characterizing the dynamics of airborne particles in buildings and human exposure to indoor and urban air pollutants. He has previously worked with research groups at the University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, and VTT Technical Research Centre in Finland as well as the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Maryland. He has received various fellowships, including a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STAR Fellowship, ASHRAE Grant-In-Aid, and a Fulbright doctoral grant to Finland. Dr. Boor received his Ph.D. from the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at The University of Texas (UT) at Austin. He also holds an M.S.E. in environmental and water resources engineering from UT Austin and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from York College of Pennsylvania. While at UT Austin, Dr. Boor participated in the interdisciplinary National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program in indoor environmental science and engineering.

William Fisk, M.S., is a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He has more than 30 years of experience in research on the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, IEQ, and occupant health and performance. Mr. Fisk is a fellow of ASHRAE and a member of the Academy of Indoor Air

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

Sciences, and he serves as an associate editor of the journal Indoor Air. He is an author of approximately 115 refereed archival journal articles or book chapters. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering. Mr. Fisk was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Damp Indoor Spaces and Health and the Committee on the Assessment of Asthma and Indoor Air Quality.

George Gray, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental and occupational health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. Dr. Gray’s primary research interests are risk characterization, risk communication, and the role of science in policy making. Particular areas of emphasis include the role of risk analysis in sustainability decisions, characterizing the risks of sparsely tested chemicals, and improving the use of scientific information in regulatory decisions. Earlier, he served as assistant administrator for the Office of Research and Development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and as the agency science advisor, promoting scientific excellence in EPA research, advocating for the continuing evolution of the agency’s approach to analysis, and encouraging programs that provide academic research to support EPA’s mission. His areas of focus included nanotechnology, ecosystem research, the influence of toxicology advances on testing and risk assessment, and sustainability. Dr. Gray has his M.S. in toxicology and Ph.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Sergey A. Grinshpun, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health and the director of the Center for Health-Related Aerosol Studies at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He has been involved in experimental and theoretical research on aerosol sampling, analysis, real-time detection, and characterization. At the University of Cincinnati since 1991, he has been engaged in the laboratory and field studies of aerosol transport in indoor and outdoor environments, aerosol exposure assessment, and the development and evaluation of respiratory protection and indoor air purification techniques with a focus on biological aerosols. He is also extensively engaged in the bio-defense and counter-terrorism research. Dr. Grinshpun’s program has been supported by government agencies and international organizations as well as major industries. He has served on panels convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; the Council of Canadian Academies; and several federal agencies. He has also served on the editorial boards of eight scientific journals. Dr. Grinshpun received his M.S. degree in physics in 1982 and Ph.D. degree in thermophysics (aerosol science) in 1987 from Odessa University in Ukraine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

William K. Hallman, Ph.D., is a professor in and the chair of the Department of Human Ecology and the former director of the Food Policy Institute at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He holds a B.S. (biology, psychology) from Juniata College and a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of South Carolina. He is a member of the graduate faculties of psychology, nutritional sciences, and planning and public policy at Rutgers. An expert in risk perception and risk communication, he has written extensively on food safety, food security, and public perceptions of controversial issues concerning food, technology, health, and the environment. Dr. Hallman has served as a member of several National Academies’ committees focused on food safety and as the chair of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and he recently co-authored a handbook on risk communication applied to food safety for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization. He currently serves on the executive committee of the Risk Communication Specialty Group of the Society for Risk Communication and as a member of the National Academies’ ad hoc Committee on the Science of Science Communication.

Roy Harrison, Ph.D., D.Sc., is the Queen Elizabeth II Birmingham Centenary Professor of Environmental Health at the University of Birmingham’s School of Geography, Earth, and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Harrison started his academic career as a chemist and then undertook postdoctoral work at Imperial College in the Department of Civil Engineering, working on air pollution by heavy metals. He moved to the University of Birmingham in 1991 to take up the newly created post of Queen Elizabeth II Birmingham Centenary Professor of Environmental Health, becoming the director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Health and the head of the Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management. He has served as the chair of the Quality of Urban Air Review Group for the Department of Environment and of the Airborne Particles Expert Group for the Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions, and he was subsequently a member of the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Science Advisory Council. He is a member of the Department of Health Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, the DEFRA Air Quality Expert Group, and the Department of Health Committee on Toxicity. He has advised the World Health Organization on both the 2005 update of the Air Quality Guidelines and the 2010 Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality. He has both his Ph.D. and D.Sc. from the University of Birmingham.

Lynn M. Hildemann, Ph.D., is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, where she has also served as an associate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

department chair, chaired the University Committee on Judicial Affairs, and been elected (twice) to the University Faculty Senate. Her current research areas include indoor sources of particulate matter, the factors affecting their dispersion within and between rooms, and assessment of human exposure to particulate toxins and airborne allergens indoors. She has served on advisory committees for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and the California Air Resources Board and as an associate editor for Environmental Science & Technology and Aerosol Science and Technology. She is currently on the advisory board for Environmental Science & Technology. Her honors include Young Investigator Awards from the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research, the Kenneth T. Whitby Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research, and Stanford’s Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (2013); she also was a co-recipient of Atmospheric Environment’s Haagen-Smit Outstanding Paper Award (2001). Professor Hildemann received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.

Lee Ann Kahlor, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Stan Richards School of Advertising at The University of Texas at Austin. Her primary research interest is in health and environmental risk communication with an emphasis on information seeking and processing. A secondary interest is in cultural and racial norms related to health behaviors and message processing. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the State of Texas, and the St. David’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research. She has won awards from the International Communication Association and the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication for her research on science communication and television viewing, and recently, she was awarded her college’s highest honor for undergraduate teaching. She is also her school’s minority liaison, working extensively with students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Prior to entering academia Dr. Kahlor worked in journalism as a freelance writer and as communication officer for a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program office. Dr. Kahlor earned an M.A. in journalism from Marquette University and a Ph.D. in mass communication from University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Glenn Morrison, Ph.D., is a professor of civil, architectural, and environmental engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology (S&T). He joined Missouri S&T in 2001 and has been a professor since 2013. He is currently the president of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) and an associate editor for Indoor Air. Dr. Morrison teaches courses in environmental engineering and studies air pollution, primarily in indoor environments. His research interests include

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

indoor air pollution, human exposure to air pollution, building science, indoor air and surface chemistry. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, in 1988 and worked for 6 years as a chemical engineer for Catalytica. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and then studied atmospheric chemistry at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colorado, before joining Missouri S&T.

David Rich, Sc.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences and in the Department of Environmental Medicine, and the associate director of the Center for Energy and Environment at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Rich’s research interests focus on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and reproductive health effects of exposures to environmental agents such as ambient air pollution, phthalates, bisphenol A, and perchlorate as well as controlled exposures to ozone and ultrafine particles. He is an environmental epidemiologist whose research is directed at understanding not only if specific environmental agents impact health, but also by what mechanism and in what potentially susceptible subgroup of the population. He also examines the utility of different methodological approaches to address these environmental epidemiology research questions. He received his Sc.D. in epidemiology and environmental health from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and his M.P.H. in epidemiology and quantitative methods from the Rutgers University (formerly University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey) School of Public Health.

David Rowson, M.S., is the director of the Indoor Environments Division at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). During his approximately 30-year career at EPA, Mr. Rowson has led several important public health initiatives, including initiatives on radon, healthy schools, and asthma and international programs on indoor air. Mr. Rowson is an alumnus of the University of Virginia where he earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in environmental sciences and meteorology. He also worked in state-level water pollution control programs prior to joining EPA.

Jeffrey Siegel, Ph.D., is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Toronto and a member of the university’s Building Engineering Research Group. His research interests including healthy and sustainable buildings, ventilation and indoor air quality in residential and commercial buildings, control of indoor particulate matter, secondary impacts of control technologies and strategies, aerosol dynamics in indoor environments, and HVAC systems. Dr. Siegel is an active member of the International Society

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, ASHRAE, and other organizations. He teaches courses in indoor air quality, sustainable buildings, and sustainable energy systems. Prior to his position at the University of Toronto, Dr. Siegel was an associate professor at The University of Texas. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Brett C. Singer, Ph.D., is a staff scientist and the group leader of indoor environment in the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is also a principal investigator in the Whole Building Systems Group in the Building Technologies and Urban Systems Division. Dr. Singer conceives and leads research projects related to air pollutant emissions and physical-chemical processes in both outdoor and indoor environments, aiming to understand real-world processes and systems that affect air pollutant exposures. The recent focus of Dr. Singer’s work has been indoor environmental quality and risk reduction in high performance homes, with the goal of accelerating adoption of indoor air quality, comfort, durability and sustainability measures into new homes and retrofits of existing homes. Key focus areas of this work are low-energy systems for filtration, smart ventilation, and mitigation approaches to indoor pollutant sources including cooking. Dr. Singer co-developed the population impact assessment modeling framework (PIAMF). He holds a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Brent Stephens, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of architectural engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). He is an expert in the fate and transport of indoor pollutants, building energy and environmental measurements, HVAC filtration, human exposure assessment, building energy simulation, and energy efficient building design. Dr. Stephens runs the Built Environment Research Group at IIT, which consists of undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers conducting research on energy efficiency and indoor air quality in buildings. His recent research projects include improving and applying methods to measure the infiltration of outdoor particulate matter and reactive gases into homes; measuring gas and particle emissions from desktop three-dimensional printers and evaluating emission control devices; measuring the in-situ particle removal efficiency of HVAC filters in real environments; developing a suite of inexpensive, open source devices based on the Arduino platform for measuring and recording long-term indoor environmental and building operational data; and characterizing the energy and air quality impacts of higher-efficiency HVAC filters in central residential air-conditioning systems. Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

Stephens holds a Ph.D. in civil engineering and an M.S.E. in environmental and water resources engineering from The University of Texas at Austin.

Barbara Turpin, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. Dr. Turpin’s research is focused on revealing fundamental processes needed to accurately predict human exposures and the effects of airborne particles from precursor emissions. She is best known for her work on the formation of organic particulate matter through aqueous chemistry (for example, in clouds), organic sampling artifacts, and modification of the ambient air pollution mix with outdoor-to-indoor transport. Her work seeks to facilitate communication among atmospheric, exposure, and health scientists with the ultimate goal of effective public health protection. She is an associate editor of Environmental Science and Technology and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, American Association for Aerosol Science, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Turpin earned a B.S. in engineering and applied science with a focus in mechanical/environmental engineering research from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from the Oregon Health & Science University.

Marc G. Weisskopf, Ph.D., Sc.D., is an associate professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research is focused on how environmental factors affect the nervous system as well as the epidemiology of neurologic disorders. Current areas of work include how environmental exposures relate to autism spectrum disorders; mental health; cognitive function/Alzheimer’s disease; Parkinson’s disease; and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Some examples of his current work include exploring how exposure to toxicants (for example, lead, manganese, and air pollution) affect cognitive function and psychiatric symptoms, how air pollution and other toxicants relate to autism spectrum disorder, and how formaldehyde and lead exposure relate to the development of ALS. Dr. Weisskopf received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco (1994), and his Sc.D. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2006. He joined the school’s faculty in 2007 and is a faculty member of both the Department of Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology.

Charles Weschler, Ph.D., is an adjunct professor in the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a visiting professor at the Technical University of Denmark and Tsinghua University (China). His research areas include chemicals present in indoor air, their sources and their fate; factors

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

that influence the concentrations, transport, and surface accumulations of indoor pollutants; human exposure to these pollutants, including the contribution of indoor pollutant exposures to total pollutant exposures and the consequent health effects; chemical reactions among indoor pollutants, with an emphasis on ozone-initiated chemistry, the production of secondary organic aerosols and ozone reactions with skin oils; semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs); and gas/particle and gas/surface partitioning of SVOCs indoors. He served as a researcher at Bell Laboratories and its successor institutions before accepting positions at EOHSI and the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Dr. Weschler has served as a member of several National Academies’ committees and from 1999 to 2005 was a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. He is an elected member of the International Academy of Indoor Air Sciences and has received the Pettenkofer Award, its highest honor. Dr. Weschler earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Information: Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23531.
×
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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines PM as a mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets comprising a number of components, including “acids (such as nitrates and sulfates), organic chemicals, metals, soil or dust particles, and allergens (such as fragments of pollen and mold spores)”. The health effects of outdoor exposure to particulate matter (PM) are the subject of both research attention and regulatory action. Although much less studied to date, indoor exposure to PM is gaining attention as a potential source of adverse health effects. Indoor PM can originate from outdoor particles and also from various indoor sources, including heating, cooking, and smoking. Levels of indoor PM have the potential to exceed outdoor PM levels.

Understanding the major features and subtleties of indoor exposures to particles of outdoor origin can improve our understanding of the exposure–response relationship on which ambient air pollutant standards are based. The EPA’s Indoor Environments Division commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to hold a workshop examining the issue of indoor exposure to PM more comprehensively and considering both the health risks and possible intervention strategies. Participants discussed the ailments that are most affected by particulate matter and the attributes of the exposures that are of greatest concern, exposure modifiers, vulnerable populations, exposure assessment, risk management, and gaps in the science. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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