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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
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Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

WORKSHOP ON BIG DATA AND ANALYTICS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESEARCH, OPERATIONS, AND POLICY

Pan American Health Organization
525 23rd Street NW, Washington, DC 20037
[With Live Webcast at www.nationalacademies.org/HMD]

TUESDAY, MAY 10, 2016

8:30 a.m. ET Welcome

James Hughes, Vice-Chair, Forum on Microbial Threats

8:35 a.m.

Big Data to Manage Global Health Risks

Victor Dzau, President, National Academy of Medicine

8:45 a.m.

Technological Capabilities to Enhance Global Health Security

Alton Romig, Executive Officer, National Academy of Engineering

8:55 a.m.

Opening Remarks

Francisco Becerra, Assistant Director, Pan American Health Organization

9:05 a.m.

Workshop Overview and Goals

Lonnie King, Workshop Chair; Vice-Chair, Forum on Microbial Threats

9:15 a.m.

Session I: Opportunities for Big Data and Analytics

Moderated by: Lonnie King

Jonna Mazet, One Health Institute, University of California, Davis Simon Hay, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Guillaume Chabot-Couture, Institute for Disease Modeling, Intellectual Ventures

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
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10:45 a.m.

Break

11:00 a.m.

Session II: Challenges and Considerations for Big Data and Analytics

Moderated by: Scott Dowell

Michael Edelstein, The Chatham House

Catherine Ordun, Booz Allen Hamilton

Emil Lesho, U.S. Department of Defense

12:30 p.m.

Lunch Break

1:30 p.m.

Session III: Case Studies in Big Data and Analysis
Moderated by: Jennifer Gardy

Assaf Anyamba, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Luciana Borio, Food and Drug Administration

Tom Schenk, City of Chicago

William DuMouchel, Oracle Health Sciences

3:00 p.m.

Break

3:15 p.m.

Session IV: Lessons from Other Sectors
Moderated by: Martin Sepúlveda

William So, Federal Bureau of Investigation

David Attaway, ESRI

Adam Sadilek, Google

Dale Griffin, U.S. Geological Survey

4:45 p.m.

Summary and Key Lessons Learned

Lonnie King

5:00 p.m.

Adjournment

WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 2016

8:30 a.m. ET

Welcome and Objectives

Lonnie King

8:45 a.m.

Group Discussion:

  • What are the key lessons and takeaways from the discussions?
  • How can big data and analytics be best managed and leveraged to tackle infectious diseases—and in what specific areas?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
  • What are the pros and cons, opportunities, and concerns (e.g., regulatory, legal, ethical, technical, human resources, and training)—and how can they be addressed?
  • What concrete steps should be pursued next to advance discussions and actions for relevant research, operations, and policies?

Group 1 Moderator: Jay Siegel (Rapporteur: Ayano Ogawa)

Group 2 Moderator: Kent Kester (Rapporteur: Kevin Finneran)

Group 3 Moderator: Lance Waller (Rapporteur: Michelle Schwalbe)

10:15 a.m.

Break

10:30 a.m.

Synthesis and General Discussion: Data Science Education, Data Integration, and Other Issues

Moderated by: George Poste

Jay Siegel

Kent Kester

Lance Waller

Jennifer Gardy

Scott Dowell

Martin Sepúlveda

Lonnie King

11:50 a.m.

Concluding Remarks

David Relman, Chair, Forum on Microbial Threats

12:00 p.m.

Adjournment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
Page 66
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With the amount of data in the world exploding, big data could generate significant value in the field of infectious disease. The increased use of social media provides an opportunity to improve public health surveillance systems and to develop predictive models. Advances in machine learning and crowdsourcing may also offer the possibility to gather information about disease dynamics, such as contact patterns and the impact of the social environment. New, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics may make it possible to capture not only diagnostic information but also other potentially epidemiologically relevant information in real time. With a wide range of data available for analysis, decision-making and policy-making processes could be improved.

While there are many opportunities for big data to be used for infectious disease research, operations, and policy, many challenges remain before it is possible to capture the full potential of big data. In order to explore some of the opportunities and issues associated with the scientific, policy, and operational aspects of big data in relation to microbial threats and public health, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop in May 2016. Participants discussed a range of topics including preventing, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats using big data and related analytics; varieties of data (including demographic, geospatial, behavioral, syndromic, and laboratory) and their broader applications; means to improve their collection, processing, utility, and validation; and approaches that can be learned from other sectors to inform big data strategies for infectious disease research, operations, and policy. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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