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Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of
Workshop Speakers

ASSAF ANYAMBA, Ph.D., is an associate research scientist with Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his undergraduate degree from Kenyatta University in Nairobi, Kenya, in geography and economics (1989) and a master’s degree in geography from Ohio University, Athens (1992). He received his Ph.D. (1997) in geography with a focus on remote sensing of land surface patterns of El Niño/Southern Oscillation from Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. His research interests are in the extraction of interannual climate variability signals from remotely sensed vegetation measurements, drought pattern analysis, applications of remotely sensed data in agricultural monitoring, drought and famine early warning, and the links between climate and disease outbreaks. His current work supports ongoing research and development collaborations with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Foreign Agricultural Service Production Estimates and Crop Assessment Division program, the U.S Agency for International Development Famine Early Warning System Network program, the U.S. Department of Defense’s Global Emerging Infection Surveillance and Response System, the USDA’s Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration programs.

DAVID FROST ATTAWAY, Ph.D., has more than 12 years of experience in geographical information systems (GISs) work and has been employed by various GIS companies. He studied and received his bachelor of arts in geography from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in 2007 and then received his master’s degree in geographic information science in 2009 from UTD before pursuing his Ph.D. from George Mason University in earth systems and geoinformation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

sciences in 2014. He has published more than nine publications in accredited journals, devised ways to integrate new spatial statistics tools into ArcGIS, and has been a lead advisor for medical geography issues worldwide. Dr. Attaway’s current medical geography analysis looks to identify limitations to dengue mapping, new methodologies to analyze risk, and ways in which to bring together multidiscipline approaches to combating vector-borne disease. He is a solution engineer at ESRI and works in the Washington, DC, regional office. He supports the National Government Sector and has served the past 3 years as a member on the Northern Virginia Geospatial Academic Advisory Board.

FRANCISCO BECERRA, Ph.D., is the assistant director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). He oversees the organization’s core programs for technical cooperation with its 35 member states. Dr. Becerra oversees the departments of family, gender, and life course; communicable diseases and health analysis; noncommunicable diseases and mental health; and health systems and services; and the special program on sustainable development and health equity. In addition, three PAHO/World Health Organization technical centers are under Dr. Becerra’s responsibility: the Latin American Center for Perinatology—Women and Reproductive Health, the Pan American Foot-and-Mouth Disease Center, and the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information. Dr. Francisco Becerra was born in Mexico City and began his career after graduating from the Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. He completed his master’s degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and earned a doctorate in public health from Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health. Dr. Becerra has served as the director general of health services of the State of Morelos, Mexico; the director for academic agreement and dissemination of the National Coordination Office of Mexico’s National Institutes of Health; an assistant director of the Center for Health Systems Research of the Ministry of Health of Mexico; and the director general of federal hospitals in Mexico. Prior to his appointment as assistant director of PAHO, Dr. Becerra was the senior advisor for Latin America and the Caribbean and coordinator of the European Union–funded Multilateral Association for Studying Health Inequalities and Enhancing North-South and South-South Cooperation (MASCOT) project at the Council on Health Research for Development.

LUCIANA BORIO, M.D., is the acting chief scientist of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this capacity she is responsible for leading and coordinating the FDA’s cross-cutting scientific and public health efforts. The Office of the Chief Scientist works closely with the FDA’s product centers, providing strategic leadership and support for the FDA’s regulatory science and innovation initiatives, including the Advancing Regulatory Science Initiative, the Critical Path Initiative, scientific professional development, scientific integrity, and the Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi). Since 2011, Dr. Borio has served

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

as the assistant commissioner for counterterrorism policy and director of the Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats (OCET) in the Office of the Chief Scientist at the FDA. In this capacity, Dr. Borio provides leadership, coordination, and oversight for the FDA’s national and global health security, counterterrorism, and emerging threat portfolios and leads the MCMi. Dr. Borio has been instrumental in coordinating the FDA’s response to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and continues to oversee the FDA’s preparedness and response activities for emerging threats, such as the avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and the West Africa Ebola epidemic. Before joining the FDA as a medical reviewer in 2008, Dr. Borio served as a senior associate at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Center for Biosecurity, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, and an advisor on biodefense programs for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Borio received her M.D. from George Washington University and continues to practice medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

GUILLAUME CHABOT-COUTURE, Ph.D., is an associate principal investigator at the Institute for Disease Modeling (IDM) at Intellectual Ventures. He leads the analysis and model usage center, primarily focused on polio eradication. He has a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University, where he focused on experimental and theoretical cuprate superconductor research. During his studies, Dr. Chabot-Couture received national post-graduate scholarships from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. His dissertation work was published in the New Journal of Physics, Physical Review, and Advanced Materials. Dr. Chabot-Couture also supported the Canadian Physics Olympiad as a lecturer and delegation leader. Since joining IDM, Dr. Chabot-Couture has worked on malaria, polio, and guinea worm. He has developed algorithms to interpolate weather station and remote sensing data into environmental data layers, he has built financial projections for the polio eradication campaign, and he has modeled polio transmission and polio risk in multiple countries. His work has been presented to the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts, and it has been used to inform disease eradication strategies by different groups within the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. His research has been published in BMC Medicine, International Health, Journal of Infectious Diseases, and PLoS ONE; he also holds five patents. Dr. Chabot-Couture’s research interests include vaccination campaign operation and monitoring, disease risk predictions, spatial dynamical modeling, financial projections, and weather modeling.

SCOTT F. DOWELL, M.D., is a pediatric infectious disease specialist by training, now focusing on tracking the causes of global childhood mortality for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He joined the foundation in 2014 after 21 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he studied viral and bacterial pneumonia, responded to outbreaks of Ebola and other pathogens, and established global disease surveillance and outbreak response programs.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

From 2001 to 2005 he established and directed the International Emerging Infections Program in Thailand, a collaboration between the CDC and the Thai Ministry of Public Health. The program received accolades from both the Thai and U.S. governments for its prominent role in responding to the severe acute respiratory syndrome crisis and for its leadership in defining the response to avian influenza A (H5N1) in Southeast Asia. Building on the success of the Thailand work on emerging infections, Dr. Dowell returned to Atlanta to help develop the Global Disease Detection (GDD) program, which became the CDC’s principal means of identifying and containing emerging infections around the world, with GDD regional centers in 10 countries. In 2009 the program was formally recognized by the World Health Organization as a collaborating center, and Dr. Dowell was named as its first director. He led the CDC’s response to the earthquake and cholera epidemic in Haiti during 2010–2011, helping to rebuild the public health infrastructure and contributing to the saving of an estimated 7,000 lives. Dr. Dowell served as the director of the Division of Global Disease Detection and Emergency Response from 2009–2012 and led the agency’s Global Health Security Agenda from 2012–2014. In 2014 he retired from the U.S. Public Health Service at the rank of rear admiral and assistant surgeon general. Dr. Dowell has co-authored more than 170 publications and has a special interest in identifying the underlying cause of nodding disease.

WILLIAM DuMOUCHEL, Ph.D., is the chief statistical scientist at Oracle Health Sciences. Mr. DuMouchel’s current research focuses on statistical computing and Bayesian hierarchical models, including applications to meta-analysis and data mining. He is the inventor of the empirical Bayesian data mining algorithm known as Gamma-Poisson Shrinker (GPS) and its successor MGPS, which have been applied to the detection of safety signals in databases of spontaneous adverse drug event reports. These methods are now used within the Food and Drug Administration and industry. From 1996 through 2004 he was a senior member of the data mining research group at AT&T Labs. Before that, he was the chief statistical scientist at BBN Software Products, where he was lead statistical designer of software advisory systems for experimental design and data analysis called RS/Discover and RS/Explore. He has been on the faculties of the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Michigan; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and most recently was a professor of biostatistics and medical informatics at Columbia University from 1994 to 1996. He has authored approximately 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has also been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Statistics in Medicine, Statistics and Computing, and the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics.

VICTOR J. DZAU, M.D., is the president of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), the chairman of the NAM Council, and the chair of the Health and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He served as the chancellor for health affairs and the James B. Duke Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the president and chief executive officer of the Duke University Health System. Dr. Dzau was the Hersey Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and the chairman of medicine at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and previously the chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University.

MICHAEL EDELSTEIN, M.P.H., is a consultant epidemiologist in England’s National Public Health Institute (Public Health England) and a consultant research fellow at the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security. His main areas of focus include vaccines, disease surveillance, and global health policy. He has previously worked for national public health agencies and international public health organizations in Europe, Africa, and Southeast Asia, and he regularly responds to major public health emergencies.

JENNIFER GARDY, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Her lab uses microbial genomics, phylogenetics, and bioinformatics to understand the transmission and epidemiology of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, influenza, and measles. Her group was the first to use genome sequencing to reconstruct a large outbreak of tuberculosis, and she is continuing to apply this novel technique to other outbreak scenarios. She is also involved in other genomics-related research, including metagenomic surveys of human and environmental samples. She completed a Ph.D. in microbial genomics and bioinformatics at Simon Fraser University as well as a postdoctoral fellowship in the systems biology of innate immunity at UBC.

DALE GRIFFIN, Ph.D., received a B.S. in microbiology in 1990 from the Department of Biology at the University of South Florida (USF). In December 1994 he received a master of science in public health, with a research focus on methods development for the detection of two pathogenic protozoa (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia) in environmental samples, from the College of Public Health at USF. In December 1999 he received a doctorate of philosophy with a research focus on the use of molecular methods for the detection of water quality indicator microorganisms and pathogenic viruses in fresh and marine waters from USF’s Department of Marine Sciences in St. Petersburg, Florida (major advisor, Dr. Joan B. Rose). In his first postdoctoral position at USF’s College of Marine Science, he worked with Dr. John H. Paul III on human enterovirus detection assays, marine lysogeny, and isolation of viruses lytic to the red-tide agent Karenia brevis. In his second postdoctoral position at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in St. Petersburg Florida, he worked with Dr. Eugene A. Shinn on a National Aeronatics and Space Administration–funded grant to study microbiology and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

public health issues associated with the atmospheric trans-Atlantic transport of African dust to the Caribbean and Americas. Dr. Griffin is currently employed by the USGS as an environmental public health microbiologist and is working on methods development for isolation of microbes from various environments (air, water, and soil) and a continental wide survey of United States soils for the background prevalence of pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Fransicella tularensis). Other projects include microbial water quality issues and long-range dust storm–associated dispersion of microorganisms around the globe (bacterial, fungal and viral community, and pathogen isolation and identification). He received master certificates in Six Sigma, lean enterprise solutions, and organizational leadership from Villanova University and has authored or co-authored 65 peer-reviewed journal articles, 10 book sections, and 46 other publications (magazine articles, proceedings papers, cruise reports, convention papers, etc.) on issues in aquatic, soil, and atmospheric microbiology.

SIMON I. HAY, Ph.D., is a professor of global health at the University of Washington and the director of geospatial science at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Dr. Hay obtained his doctorates from the University of Oxford, where he remains a member of congregation, a research fellow in the sciences and mathematics at St John’s College and a professor of epidemiology at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed and other publications. He was elected to the board of trustees of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in 2012 and served as its 52nd president (2013–2015). Dr. Hay has received numerous awards, notably the Back Award of the Royal Geographical Society (2012) for research contributing to public health policy and the Bailey K. Ashford Medal (2013) and the Chalmers Medal (2015) of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, respectively, for distinguished work in tropical medicine. He was elected to the fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2015.

JAMES M. HUGHES, M.D., is a professor of medicine (infectious diseases) and public health (global health) at Emory University’s School of Medicine and Rollins School of Public Health and serves as a senior advisor to the Emory Center for Global Safe Water. Prior to joining Emory in June 2005, Dr. Hughes served as the director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Hughes received his B.A. and M.D. degrees from Stanford University and completed postgraduate training in internal medicine at the University of Washington, infectious diseases at the University of Virginia, and preventive medicine at the CDC. After joining the CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer in 1973, Dr. Hughes worked initially on food-borne and water-related diseases and subsequently on infection control in health care settings. He served as director of the CDC’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

Hospital Infections Program from 1983 to 1988, as deputy director of NCID from 1988 to 1992, and as director of NCID from 1992 to 2005. A major focus of Dr. Hughes’s career is on building partnerships among the clinical, research, public health, and veterinary communities to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious diseases and improve health at the local, national, and global levels. His research interests include emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; antimicrobial resistance; food-borne diseases; health care–associated infections; vector-borne and zoonotic diseases; the rapid detection of and response to infectious diseases and bioterrorism; strengthening public health capacity at the local, national, and global levels; improving immunization coverage; and preventing water-related diseases in the developing world.

KENT KESTER, M.D., is currently the vice president and head of translational science and biomarkers at Sanofi Pasteur. During a 24-year career in the U.S. Army, he worked extensively in clinical vaccine development and led multiple research platforms at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the U.S. Department of Defense’s largest and most diverse biomedical research laboratory, an institution he later led as its commander/director. His final military assignment was as the associate dean for clinical research in the School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). Dr. Kester holds an undergraduate degree from Bucknell University and an M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Maryland and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. A vaccine researcher with more than 60 scientific manuscripts and book chapters, Dr. Kester has played a major role in the development of the malaria vaccine candidate known as RTS,S, having safely conducted the largest number of experimental malaria challenge studies ever attempted to date. He previously chaired the steering committee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)/USUHS Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program and has served as a member of the Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biologics Products Advisory Committee, the NIAID Advisory Council, and the Office of Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While on active duty in the U.S. Army, Dr. Kester also served as the consultant to the Army Surgeon General both in infectious diseases and in medical research and development. Board-certified in both internal medicine and infectious diseases, he holds faculty appointments at USUHS, Georgetown, and the University of Maryland and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Infectious Disease Society of America, and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

LONNIE J. KING, D.V.M., is the professor and dean emeritus of the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University (OSU). In addition to leading this college, Dr. King is also a professor of preventive medicine and holds the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

Ruth Stanton Endowed Chair in Veterinary Medicine. He also serves as the executive dean for the seven health science colleges at OSU. Before becoming dean at OSU, he was the director of the new National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this new position, Dr. King leads the center’s activities for surveillance, diagnostics, disease investigations, epidemiology, research, public education, policy development, and disease prevention and control programs. NCZVED also focuses on waterborne, food-borne, vectorborne, and zoonotic diseases of public health concern, which also include most of the CDC’s select and bioterrorism agents, neglected tropical diseases, and emerging zoonoses. Before serving as director, he was the first chief of the agency’s Office of Strategy and Innovation.

Dr. King was in private veterinary practice for 7 years in Dayton, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. As a native of Wooster, Ohio, Dr. King received his bachelor of science and doctor of veterinary medicine degrees from OSU in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He earned his master of science degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and received his master’s degree in public administration from American University in Washington, DC, in 1991. Dr. King is a board-certified member of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and has completed the senior executive fellowship program at Harvard University. He served as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges from 1999 to 2000 and was the vice-chair for the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues from 2000 to 2004.

EMIL LESHO, D.O., is a 1990 graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases. He has been an active duty Army physician for 25 years and is currently assigned to the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Maryland, where he co-founded and is the director of the Multidrug-Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network and the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (MRSN-ARMOR). The MRSN-ARMOR Program is the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DoD’s) flagship agency for conducting epidemiologic surveillance and applied research of multidrug-resistant organisms isolated from health care–associated infections, including war trauma. Dr. Lesho is also the co-chair of the DoD’s Infection Prevention and Control Working Group, a media roundtable expert for the Military Health System Research Symposium, and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command’s representative to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats. He is a member of the Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Working Group, and the U.S. Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Society of Healthcare Epidemiologists of America. Former memberships include the Center for Strategic and International Studies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

Working Group on Antimicrobial Resistance for the Global Health Policy Center for Strategic and International Studies, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s Antimicrobial Resistance Committee.

JONNA MAZET, D.V.M, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and disease ecology and the executive director of the One Health Institute in the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, where she focuses on global health problem solving, especially for emerging infectious disease and conservation challenges. Dr. Mazet is active in international One Health research programs, most notably in relation to disease transmission among wildlife, domestic animals, and people and the ecological drivers of disease emergence. Currently, she is the global director of a $175 million viral emergence early warning project named PREDICT, which has been developed with the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Emerging Pandemic Threats Program. She was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Medicine in 2013 in recognition of her successful and innovative approach to emerging environmental and global health threats.

CATHERINE ORDUN, M.P.H., M.B.A., leads a variety of data science and health surveillance teams at Booz Allen Hamilton’s Strategic Innovation Group. She currently supports the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and has also provided data science support for the U.S. Navy and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and helping to lead a project at the FDA. Ms. Ordun is also leading a data science initiative at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Resolution Management to develop descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive analytics for equal employment opportunity complaints. She has led work using natural language processing, using R, R Shiny, and Python, as well as full-scale Web application development using Elasticsearch, Amazon Web Services, and multiple open-source technologies. Prior to joining Booz Allen Hamilton in 2011, Ms. Ordun worked on weapons of mass destruction at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and she began her career at the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control studying bomb-blast injuries. She has a B.S. in applied biology from the Georgia Institute of Technology, a master’s in public health from Emory University, and an M.B.A. from George Washington University.

GEORGE POSTE, D.V.M., Ph.D., is the chief scientist of the Complex Adaptive Systems Initiative and the Del E. Webb Professor of Health Innovation at Arizona State University (ASU). He assumed this post in 2009. From 2003 to 2009 he directed and built the Biodesign Institute at ASU. In addition to his academic post, he serves on the boards of directors of Monsanto, Exelixis, Caris Life Sciences, and LGC, and the scientific advisory board of Synthetic Genomics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

From 1992 to 1999 he was the chief science and technology officer and president of research and development at SmithKline Beecham (SB). During his tenure at SB he was associated with the successful registration of 31 drug, vaccine, and diagnostic products. In 2004 he was named “R&D Scientist of the Year” by R&D Magazine, in 2006 he received the Einstein Award from the Global Business Leadership Council, and in 2009 he received the Scrip Lifetime Achievement award voted by the leadership of the global pharmaceutical industry.

DAVID A. RELMAN, M.D., is the Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University and is the chief of infectious diseases at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in Palo Alto, California. He received an S.B. (biology) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977) and his M.D. (magna cum laude) from Harvard Medical School (1982), completed his clinical training in internal medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital, served as a postdoctoral fellow in microbiology at Stanford University, and joined the faculty at Stanford in 1994. Dr. Relman advises the U.S. government as well as nongovernmental organizations in matters pertaining to microbiology, emerging infectious diseases, and biosecurity. He is a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity and a member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Synthetic Biology Panel, and he advises several U.S. government departments and agencies on matters related to pathogen diversity, the future life sciences landscape, and the nature of present and future biological threats. He has served as chair of the board of scientific counselors of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and as the president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (2012–2013). Dr. Relman was the vice-chair of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committee that studied the science underlying the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation of the 2001 anthrax mailings, and he co-chaired a 3-year NAS study that produced a widely cited report titled, Globalization, Biosecurity, and the Future of the Life Sciences (2006). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Relman received the Squibb Award from the Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2001 and was the recipient of both the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in 2006 as well as a Transformative R01 Award from NIH in 2013. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2011.

ALTON D. ROMIG, JR., Ph.D., is the executive officer of the National Academy of Engineering. Under congressional charter, the academy provides advice to the federal government, when requested, on matters of engineering and technology. As executive officer, Dr. Romig is the chief operating officer responsible for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

the program, financial and membership operations of the academy, and reporting to the president. Prior to joining the academy, he served as vice president and general manager of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Advanced Development Programs, better known as the Skunk Works®. Dr. Romig spent the majority of his career at Sandia National Laboratories, operated by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. He joined Sandia as a member of the technical staff in 1979 and moved through a succession of research and development management positions, leading to his appointment as executive vice president in 2005. He served as the deputy laboratories director and chief operating officer until 2010, when he transferred to the Skunk Works. Dr. Romig graduated summa cum laude from Lehigh University in 1975 with a B.S. in materials science and engineering. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Lehigh University in 1977 and 1979, respectively. Dr. Romig is a fellow of ASM International, the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society; the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Romig was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2003 and the Council of Foreign Relations in 2008. He was awarded the ASM Silver Medal for Materials Research in 1988.

ADAM SADILEK, Ph.D., is a senior scientist at Google, where he focuses on large-scale machine learning applied to health, speech understanding, and other domains. Prior to joining Google, Dr. Sadilek was the co-founder and chief executive officer of Fount.in, a machine learning startup providing automated text understanding. Dr. Sadilek obtained his Ph.D. in artificial intelligence from the University of Rochester. Advised by Henry Kautz, Dr. Sadilek led the development of nEmesis, a system that enables real-time epidemiological models. nEmesis demonstrated that the spread of flu and food-borne illness can be effectively predicted by mining online data. In parallel with his studies, Dr. Sadilek has done research and development work at eBay Research Labs, Google, and Microsoft Research, where he focused on optimization and novel applications of machine learning in the context of big data.

TOM SCHENK, M.S., is the chief data officer in Chicago, Illinois, which includes overseeing Chicago’s open data portal, advanced analytics team, and the city’s data and business intelligence team. He leads the strategic use of data to improve the efficiency of city operations and improve the quality of life for residents, including the expansion of the open data portal, opengrid.io project, and several predictive analytics projects, such as predicting food inspection violations throughout the city. He has published a data visualization book, Circos Data Visualization How-To and number of academic articles and book chapters. Mr. Schenk was formerly the lead on institutional effectiveness and accountability at the Iowa Departments of Education, a visiting scholar with Iowa State University’s Office of Community College Research and Policy, and a lecturer

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

at Grand View University, where he taught statistics and economics. He earned a master’s degree in economics from Iowa State University and a bachelor’s degree from Drake University.

MARTIN J. SEPÚLVEDA, M.D., is an IBM Fellow and a retired vice president of health industries research for the IBM Corporation. He led a global team of health industry subject-matter experts guiding applied research in diverse disciplines for health care systems solutions and transformation in mature and rapid growth countries worldwide. Before this, he served as IBM’s vice president for integrated health services and led health policy, strategy, health benefits design and purchasing, occupational health, wellness, and health productivity for IBM globally. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Preventive Medicine, and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. He was elected an honorary member of the American Academy of Family Medicine and serves on the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, the Commonwealth Fund Commission for a High Performance Health System, the Council on Health Research for Economic Development, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. He is the chair of the Global Business Group on Health and the Institute for Health Benefits Innovation Research at the Employee benefits Research Institute. He received his M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Harvard University. He completed residencies in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, Hospitals and in occupational/environmental medicine at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; trained in the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and completed a fellowship in internal medicine at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

JAY P. SIEGEL, M.D., is the chief biotechnology officer and the head of scientific strategy and policy for Johnson & Johnson (J&J). Dr. Siegel is actively engaged at the national and international levels in policy development with regard to scientific and regulatory issues and has worked with the World Health Organization, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency, the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO), and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations in the development and implementation of biosimilars policy. He currently serves on the executive committees and the boards of directors of BIO and the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine. Dr. Siegel joined J&J in 2003 as president of Centocor Research and Development, Inc. and subsequently served as J&J group president of research and development for biotechnology, immunology, and oncology. The groups he led were responsible for the successful discovery and development of several pharmaceutical products, including most indications for Remicade, Stelara, Simponi, and Sylvant. Dr. Siegel later served as the head of global regulatory affairs and head of the Biotechnology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

Center of Excellence for Janssen, the pharmaceutical companies of J&J. Before joining J&J, Dr. Siegel spent 20 years at the FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in positions of increasing responsibility, including directing the office responsible for review and approval of all therapeutic biologics. While at the FDA, Dr. Siegel helped negotiate and sign off on 16 International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use guidelines.

WILLIAM SO, Ph.D., is currently a policy and program specialist with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Directorate, Biological Countermeasures Unit. In this capacity Dr. So provides subject-matter expertise in the field of biological sciences for matters dealing with FBI policy, national policy, response planning, and biosecurity. He has been in this position for the past 8 years, after serving 1 year as an analyst and an additional year prior to that as a physical scientist in the FBI’s Laboratory Division. Dr. So received his Ph.D. in environmental toxicology in 2005 and a master of science in ecology in 1997 from George Washington University. His experience includes policy, strategic guidance, and concept-of-operations related to biological crimes for both the FBI and the U.S. government. Dr. So’s current projects include bridging the gap between researchers/academics and law enforcement/ security officials in matters related to biosecurity, dual-use, emerging technologies, and pathogen security.

LANCE A. WALLER, Ph.D., is the Rollins Professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. He received his B.S. in mathematics from New Mexico State University (1986) and his Ph.D. in operations research from Cornell University (1991). He is currently a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. His research involves the development and application of statistical methods for spatially referenced data, including applications in environmental justice, neurology, epidemiology, disease surveillance, conservation biology, and disease ecology. He has published in a variety of biostatistical, statistical, environmental health, and ecology journals and is co-author with Carol Gotway of the text Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data (2004, Wiley).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research, Operations, and Policy: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23654.
×
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With the amount of data in the world exploding, big data could generate significant value in the field of infectious disease. The increased use of social media provides an opportunity to improve public health surveillance systems and to develop predictive models. Advances in machine learning and crowdsourcing may also offer the possibility to gather information about disease dynamics, such as contact patterns and the impact of the social environment. New, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics may make it possible to capture not only diagnostic information but also other potentially epidemiologically relevant information in real time. With a wide range of data available for analysis, decision-making and policy-making processes could be improved.

While there are many opportunities for big data to be used for infectious disease research, operations, and policy, many challenges remain before it is possible to capture the full potential of big data. In order to explore some of the opportunities and issues associated with the scientific, policy, and operational aspects of big data in relation to microbial threats and public health, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop in May 2016. Participants discussed a range of topics including preventing, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats using big data and related analytics; varieties of data (including demographic, geospatial, behavioral, syndromic, and laboratory) and their broader applications; means to improve their collection, processing, utility, and validation; and approaches that can be learned from other sectors to inform big data strategies for infectious disease research, operations, and policy. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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