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Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs (2018)

Chapter: Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
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Appendix E

Biographical Sketches of
Panel Members and Staff

RITA R. COLWELL (Cochair) is distinguished university professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Maryland and at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. She served as director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) between 1998 and 2004. Before joining NSF, she was president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland. She was also a member of the National Science Board from 1984 to 1990. Her interests include K–12 science and mathematics education, graduate science and engineering education, and the increased participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She has been awarded 61 honorary degrees from institutions of higher education, and is the recipient of the 2017 National Science Board Vannevar Bush Award, the 2010 Stockholm Water Prize, and the 2006 National Medal of Science. She holds a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington.

JAMES S. HOUSE (Cochair) is Angus Campbell distinguished university professor emeritus of survey research, public policy, and sociology at the University of Michigan. He is a former director of the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research. Prior to joining the University of Michigan, he taught at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research has focused on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

topics in the areas of social psychology, political sociology, social structure and personality, psychosocial and socioeconomic factors in health, survey research methods, and American society. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine (now National Academy of Medicine). He also serves as a member on the Committee on National Statistics. He holds a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan.

JENNIFER SUE BOND is senior fellow at the Council on Competitiveness and a consultant for science and technology policy issues. She is the former director of the Science and Engineering Indicators Program at the National Science Foundation. In the past, she also served as a senior international policy analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; as a congressional fellow in the Senate, focused on education and science policy issues; and an advisor to the Battelle Center for Science and Technology Policy. For more than a decade she was a U.S. representative to OECD and vice chair of OECD’s National Experts on Science, Technology, and Industry Indicators. She worked with the European Union on several issues, including the Community Innovation Surveys, Public Attitudes Towards Science and Technology, and Mega-Science Issues. She holds an M.A. in science, technology, and public policy from the George Washington University.

GEOFFREY DAVIS is staff quantitative analyst on the Google Accelerated Science team at Alphabet in Mountain View, California. His previous Alphabet roles include Verily (Google Life Sciences), Google Infrastructure, Google AdWords, and Google News. Prior to joining Google, he was assistant professor in the Mathematics Department at Dartmouth College, Texas Instruments visiting assistant professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University, a researcher in the Signal Processing Group at Microsoft Research, a developer at the San Francisco-based startup company 4charity, a visiting scholar at Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society, and a Werthheim fellow in the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. He has had a long-standing interest in science education and policy issues and is a past member of the Science and Engineering Workforce Project of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a recipient of the Leon K. Kirchmayer Prize Paper Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He holds a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Courant Institute at New York University.

DONALD A. DILLMAN is Regents professor in the Department of Sociology at Washington State University. He also serves as deputy director for research and development in the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center at Washington State University. Previously, he served as senior

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

survey methodologist in the office of the director at the U.S. Census Bureau. He is recognized internationally as a major contributor to the development of modern mail, telephone, and Internet survey methods. In 2000, he received the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics for his work at the Census Bureau. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Statistical Association, and served as past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the Rural Sociological Society. He also serves as a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Iowa State University.

RICHARD B. FREEMAN is Herbert Ascherman chair in economics at Harvard University. He is currently serving as faculty co-chair of the Harvard University Trade Union Program. He is also director of the Labor Studies Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), senior research fellow in labor markets at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance, and visiting professor at the London School of Economics (LSE). He also directs the NBER/Sloan Science Engineering Workforce Project and an LSE research program on the effects of the Internet on labor markets, social behavior, and the economy. His many research interests include the job market for scientists and engineers. He is the recipient of the Mincer Lifetime Achievement Prize from the Society of Labor Economics and the IZA Prize in Labor Economics. He was also appointed Frances Perkins fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

JACK G. GAMBINO is director of the Household Survey Methods Division at Statistics Canada. He manages a division consisting of three subdivisions responsible for the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of almost all of Statistics Canada’s household surveys. Previously, he led a division that was responsible for the methodology of Canada’s census of population. He participated in two redesigns of the Canadian labor force survey, proposing innovations to improve the survey design and planning studies to evaluate these proposals. He also provided guidance and advice to methodologists and client program managers on methodological issues, including research and development of innovative methods, and chaired the Methodology Research and Development Committee, which was responsible for overseeing research in the methodology branch. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto.

KRISZTINA MARTON (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She served as study director for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

numerous CNSTAT consensus panels, standing committees, workshops, and expert meetings, including the Panel on Addressing Priority Technical Issues for the American Community Survey, the Panel on Statistical Methods for Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey, and the Panel on Redesigning the Commercial Buildings and Residential Energy Consumption Surveys of the Energy Information Administration. Prior to joining CNSTAT, she was a survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research and a survey director in the Ohio State University Center for Survey Research. She holds a Ph.D. in communication with an interdisciplinary specialization in survey research from Ohio State University.

MARESI NERAD is professor of higher education leadership in the College of Education and founding director of the Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education (CIRGE) at the University of Washington. Previously, she was director of graduate research at the University of California, Berkeley, where she undertook various studies on graduate education in the United States and abroad, including examinations of factors affecting time-to-degree and doctoral attrition, as well as a national study on the career paths of doctorates. In her current work at CIRGE, she oversees research on the quality of doctoral programs, careers of doctorate holders, and evaluations of innovations in doctoral education in the United States and in an international context. She served on many national and institutional doctoral education reviews and on U.S. and international advisory boards, such as the International Advisory Committee for Science and Engineering of the National Science Foundation; the Presidential Innovation Board of the University of Bremen, Germany; and the Graduate Academy of the Goethe University of Frankfurt. She holds a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of California, Berkeley.

RANDALL J. OLSEN is professor emeritus of economics and former director of the Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University. He also served as director of the Initiative in Population Research, an interdisciplinary population center at Ohio State University. For more than 20 years he has been heavily involved with the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), a set of large-scale surveys that follow cohorts of Americans to collect data on labor force behavior, educational attainment, training, and related topics. He has overseen the transition of the NLS from legacy data collection systems to an integrated system for handling all phases of survey work, from instrument authoring through data dissemination. His interests are in econometrics, labor economics, and applied micro and economic demography. He has served as an associate editor for Evaluation Review, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, and Demography. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

WILLIE PEARSON, Jr. is professor of sociology and former chair of the School of History, Technology, and Society at Georgia Institute of Technology. Previously, he held a distinguished appointment as Wake Forest professor of sociology at Wake Forest University and an adjunct position in medical education at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Most of his research has centered on the career patterns of Ph.D. scientists, particularly African Americans, and on human resource issues in science and engineering. He received the Giants in Science award from the Quality Education for Minorities in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Network; is a national associate of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

KEITH F. RUST is vice president and associate director of the statistical staff at Westat, Inc. He is also a research associate professor in the Joint Program on Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously, he worked for the Australian Bureau of Statistics. He has extensive experience in sampling methods, the design and specification of large-scale sample surveys, and analysis of survey data. His areas of special expertise include methods for analyzing large, complex datasets; methods of deriving survey weights; and sampling error estimation procedures. He has applied his research and knowledge to a variety of education research projects over the past several years, including the Programme for International Student Assessment and the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He received a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.

NORA CATE SCHAEFFER is Sewell Bascom professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and faculty director of the University of Wisconsin Survey Center, where she teaches courses in survey research methods and conducts research on questionnaire design and interaction during survey interviews. She serves on the editorial boards of Sociological Methods and Research and Public Opinion Quarterly, and is also a member of the General Social Survey Board of Overseers. She recently completed terms as Council on Sections representative for the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association and as a member of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. She was selected as a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She previously served on the Committee on National Statistics. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

JAMES WAGNER is research associate professor at the Survey Research Center and research affiliate at the Population Studies Center, both at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. He teaches in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology and serves as associate editor of Survey Research Methods. He also serves as principal investigator on several studies and is the chief mathematical statistician on the National Survey of Family Growth. His research interests include nonresponse error, quality indicators for survey data, and responsive or adaptive design. He also develops and implements responsive design plans for large surveys. He holds a Ph.D. from the program in survey methodology at the University in Michigan.

YU XIE is Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 university professor of sociology and director of the Center on Contemporary China at the Princeton Institute of International and Regional Studies, Princeton University. He is also visiting chair professor of the Center for Social Research, Peking University, in China. Previously, he was distinguished university professor of sociology, statistics, and public policy at the University of Michigan. His main areas of interest are social stratification, demography, statistical methods, Chinese studies, and the sociology of science. He authored the book Is American Science in Decline? with Alexandra Killewald. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Academia Sinica, and the National Academy of Sciences. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL STATISTICS

The Committee on National Statistics was established in 1972 at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to improve the statistical methods and information on which public policy decisions are based. The committee carries out studies, workshops, and other activities to foster better measures and fuller understanding of the economy, the environment, public health, crime, education, immigration, poverty, welfare, and other public policy issues. It also evaluates ongoing statistical programs and tracks the statistical policy and coordinating activities of the federal government, serving a unique role at the intersection of statistics and public policy. The committee’s work is supported by a consortium of federal agencies through a National Science Foundation grant, a National Agricultural Statistics Service cooperative agreement, and several individual contracts.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
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The National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), one of the nation’s principal statistical agencies, is charged to collect, acquire, analyze, report, and disseminate statistical data related to the science and engineering enterprise in the United States and other nations that is relevant and useful to practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and to the public. NCSES data, based primarily on several flagship surveys, have become the major evidence base for American science and technology policy, and the agency is well respected globally for these data.

This report assesses and provides guidance on NCSES’s approach to measuring the science and engineering workforce population in the United States. It also proposes a framework for measuring the science and engineering workforce in the next decade and beyond, with flexibility to examine emerging issues related to this unique population while at the same time allowing for stability in the estimation of key trends

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