National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 6 Data Analysis, Dissemination, and Outreach
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

References

Aanerud, R., Homer, L., Nerad, M., and Cerny, C. (2006). Paths and perceptions: Assessing doctoral education using career path analysis. In P. L. Maki and N. Borkowski (Eds.), The Assessment of Doctoral Education: Emerging Criteria and New Models for Improving Outcomes (pp. 109–143). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Aanerud, R., Homer, L., Rudd, E., Morrison, E., Nerad, M., and Cerny, J. (2007). Widening the lens on gender and tenure: Looking beyond the academic labor market. NWSA Journal, 19(3), 105–123.

Angeles, D. (2016). Younger baby boomers and number of jobs held. Career Outlook, June. Available: https://www.bls.gov/careeroutlook/2016/data-on-display/younger-baby-boomers-and-number-of-jobs-held.htm [November 20, 2017].

Appelt, S., van Beuzekom, B., Galindo-Rueda, F., and de Pinho, R. (2015). Which Factors Influence the International Mobility of Research Scientists?. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2015/02. Paris, France: OECD. doi:10.1787/5js1tmrr2233-en.

Auriol, L., Misu, M., and Freeman, R. A. (2013). Careers of Doctorate Holders: Analysis of Labour Market and Mobility Indicators. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2013/04. Paris, France: OECD. doi:10.1787/5k43nxgs289w-en.

Biemer, P. P., and Lyberg, L. E. (2003). Introduction to Survey Quality. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Blanpied, W. A. (Ed.). (1995). Memoranda for program for the National Science Foundation, February 15, 1951. In W. A. Blanpied (Ed.), Impacts of the Early Cold War on the Formulation of U.S. Science Policy: Selected Memoranda of William T. Golden, October 1950–April 1951 (pp. 90–93). Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. Available: https://www.aaas.org/sites/default/files/reports/golden.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Blumenfield, T., and Nerad, M. (2012). International assessment: Developing a research agenda for (post)graduate education and collaboration. Australian Universities Review, 54(1), 72–83.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

Boselli, B., and Galindo-Rueda, F. (2016). Drivers and Implications of Scientific Open Access Publishing: Findings from a Pilot OECD International Survey of Scientific Authors. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Policy Papers, No. 33. Paris, France: OECD. doi.org/10.1787/5jlr2z70k0bx-en.

Bush, V. (1945 [1990]). Science—The Endless Frontier: A Report to the President on a Program for Postwar Scientific Research. Washington, DC: National Science Foundation.

Ceci, S. J., and Williams, W. M. (2010). The Mathematics of Sex: How Biology and Society Conspire to Limit Talented Women and Girls. New York: Oxford University Press.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015). 2013–2015 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG): Sample Design Documentation. Available: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nsfg/NSFG_2013-2015_Sample_Design_Documentation.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Chesley, K. (2015). New website reveals Ph.D. career paths for Stanford alumni. Stanford News, October 13.

Commission on Evidence Based Policy Making. (2017). The Promise of Evidence-Based Policymaking. Available: https://www.cep.gov/content/dam/cep/report/cep-final-report.pdf [November 20, 2017].

Ehrenberg, E., and Kuh, C. (Eds.). (2009). Doctoral Education and the Faculty of the Future. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

European Science Foundation. (2013). Research Careers in Europe. Landscape and Horizons. Available: http://archives.esf.org/fileadmin/Public_documents/Publications/moforum_research_careers.pdf [September 20, 2017].

European Science Foundation. (2015). Career Tracking of Doctorate Holders. Available: http://www.esf.org/uploads/media/Career_Tracking_01.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Fecso, R. S., Frase, M. J., and Kannankutty, N. (2012). Using the American Community Survey as the Sampling Frame for the National Survey of College Graduates. NCSES 12-201 Working Paper. Available: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/ncses12201/pdf/ncses12201.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Fiegener, M., and Finamore, J. (2016). Specific Issues for the Study. Presentation prepared for the Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce, Washington, DC, April 25.

Finamore, J. (2016). Overview of the NCSES S&E Workforce Surveys. Presentation prepared for the Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce, Washington, DC, April 25.

Finamore, J., and Dillman, D. (2013). How Mode Sequence Affects Responses by Internet, Mail, and Telephone in the National Survey of College Graduates. Paper presented at the 5th Conference of the European Survey Research Association, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Finn, M. (2010). Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities, 2007. Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education. Available: https://orise.orau.gov/stem/reports/stay-rates-foreign-doctorate-recipients-2007.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Finn, M. (2012). Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities, 2009. Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education. Available: https://orise.orau.gov/stem/reports/stay-rates-foreign-doctorate-recipients-2009.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Finn, M. (2014). Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities, 2011. Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education. Available: https://orise.orau.gov/stem/reports/stay-rates-foreign-doctorate-recipients-2011.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Freeman R., and Goroff, D. L. (2009). Science and Engineering Careers in the United States. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Galarneau, D., Hinchley, C., and Ntwari, A. (2017). Labour Market Outcomes of Graduates from Universities in the Maritime Provinces. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2017001/article/14798-eng.htm [September 20, 2017].

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

Gibbs, K. D., Jr., McGready, J., Bennett, J. C., and Griffin, K. (2014). Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender. PLoS One, 9(12), e114736.

Golde, C. M., and Dore, T. M. (2001). At Cross Purposes: What the Experiences of Doctoral Students Reveal about Doctoral Education. Available: http://www.phd-survey.org/report%20final.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Goulden, M., Frasch, K., and Mason, M. A. (2009). Staying Competitive: Patching America’s Leaky Pipeline in the Sciences. Available: https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/issues/2009/11/pdf/women_and_sciences.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Gupta, D., Nerad, M., and Cerny, J. (2003). International Ph.D.s: Exploring the choice to stay or return. International Higher Education, Spring. Available: http://www.education.uw.edu/cirge/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/international-phds.htm [September 20, 2017].

Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R., and Friedman, J. (2009). The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction (2nd Edition). New York: Springer.

Leggon, C. B., and Pearson, Jr., W. (2008). Assessing programs to improve minority participation in STEM fields: What we know and what we need to know. In R. Ehrenberg and C. Kuh (Eds.), Doctoral Education and the Faculty of the Future (pp. 160–174). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Lin, Z., Pearce, R., and Wang, W. (2009). Imported talents: Demographic characteristics, achievement and job satisfaction of foreign born full time faculty in four-year American colleges. Higher Education: The International Journal of Higher Education and Educational Planning, 57(6), 703–721. doi:10.1007/s10734-008-9171-z.

Malcom, L., and Malcom, S. (2011). The double bind: The next generation. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 162–171.

Martin, D. E., and Pearson, Jr., W. (2005). Preparing the STEM Workforce of the 21st Century: Broadening Participation through a Comprehensive Integrative System. Final Workshop Report. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation. Available: http://www2.seas.gwu.edu/~stem/report.htm [September 20, 2017].

Martinez, A., Epstein, C., and Parsad, A. (2015). Evaluation of the National Science Foundation’s Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program. Final Report. Cambridge, MA: Abt Associates. Available: http://abtassociates.com/AbtAssociates/files/54/541407a8-485e-4f5d-8697-bb17542544e8.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Morrison, E., Rudd, E., and Nerad, M. (2011). Onto, up, off the academic faculty ladder: The gendered effects of family on career transitions for a cohort of social science Ph.D.s. The Review of Higher Education, 34(4), 525–553.

Musselin, C. (2010). The Market for Academics. New York: Routledge.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016a). Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4-Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Diverse Student Pathways. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/21739.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016b). Reducing Response Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi.org/10.17226/23639.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2017). Federal Statistics, Multiple Data Sources, and Privacy Protection: Next Steps. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi.org/10.17226/24893.

National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. (2010). Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi.org/10.17226/12999.

National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. (2011). Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi:10.17226/12984.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017a). The 2015 Survey of Doctorate Recipients Expands Its Population Coverage and Reporting on Field of Study. National Science Foundation, InfoBrief NSF 17-319. Available: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2017/nsf17319 [September 20, 2017].

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017b). 2017–2019 Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: OMB Supporting Statement Section A. National Science Foundation. Available: https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAViewDocument?ref_nbr=201709-3145-001 [November 9, 2017].

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (2017c). Supporting Statement for Survey of Earned Doctorates 2018 and 2019 Survey Cycles. National Science Foundation. Available: https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAViewDocument?ref_nbr=201704-3145-001 [November 9, 2017].

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017d). Supporting Statement for the 2017 National Survey of College Graduates. National Science Foundation. Available: https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAViewDocument?ref_nbr=201612-3145-001 [November 9, 2017].

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017e). Supporting Statement for the 2017 Survey of Doctorate Recipients. National Science Foundation. Available: https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAViewDocument?ref_nbr=201704-3145-003 [October 11, 2017].

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017f). Survey of Doctorate Recipients: 2015 Sample Expansion and Longitudinal Analysis Capabilities. Presentation for a meeting with representatives from the American Economic Association, Washington, DC, March 7.

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. (2017g). Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2017. Special Report NSF 17-310. Available: https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/2017/nsf17310/static/downloads/nsf17310-digest.pdf [December 2017].

National Research Council. (1989). Surveying the Nation’s Scientists and Engineers: A Data System for the 1990s. Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System. C. F. Citro and G. Kalton (Eds.). Committee on National Statistics, Commission on Behavioral and Scoical Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (2003). Improving the Design of the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System. Committee on National Statistics, Committee to Review the 2000 Decade Design of the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System (SESTAT), Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2008). Using the American Community Survey for NSF’s S&E Workforce Statistics Program. Panel on Assessing the Benefits of the American Community Survey for the NSF Division of Science Resources Statistics, Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2012a). Continuing Innovation in Information Technology. Committee on Depicting Innovation in Information Technology, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi.org/10.17226/13427.

National Research Council. (2012b). Research Universities and the Future of America: Ten Breakthrough Actions Vital to Our Nation’s Prosperity and Security: Summary. Policy and Global Affairs, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, Committee on Research Universities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi.org/10.17226/13299.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

National Research Council. (2014). Capturing Change in Science, Technology, and Innovation: Improving Indicators to Inform Policy. Panel on Developing Science, Technology, and Innovation Indicators for the Future. R. E. Litan, A. W. Wyckoff, and K. Husbands Fealing (Eds.). Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education; Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Division of Policy and Global Affairs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Science Board. (2000). Science and Engineering Indicators 2000. NSB 00-1. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

National Science Board. (2015). Revisiting the STEM Workforce: A Companion to Science and Engineering Indicators 2014. NSB 2015-10. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

National Science Board. (2016). Science and Engineering Indicators 2016. NSB-2016-1. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation.

National Science Board. (2017). SHE Doctorates in the Workforce, 1993–2013. Available: https://www.nsf.gov/nsb/sei/infographic2/#about [November 22, 2017].

Nerad, M. (2009). Confronting common assumptions: Designing future-oriented doctoral education. In R. Ehrenberg and C. Kuh (Eds.), Doctoral Education and the Faculty of the Future (pp. 80–89). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Nerad, M., and Blumenfield, T. (2012). Investigating the International Experiences in STEM Graduate Education and Beyond: Report from the February 2011 Workshop to Develop a Research Agenda. Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education.

Nerad, M., and Cerny, J. (1999). Postdoctoral patterns, career advancement, and problems, in American Association for the Advancement of Science. Science, 285(5433), 1533–1535.

Nerad, M., and Cerny, J. (2002). Postdoctoral appointments and employment patterns of science and engineering doctoral recipients ten-plus years after Ph.D. completion: Selected results from the “Ph.D.s—Ten Years Later” Study. Communicator, 35(7), August–September, Available: http://www.education.uw.edu/cirge/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/postdoctoral-appointments.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Ong, M., Wright, C., Espinosa, L. L., and Orfield, G. (2011). Inside the double bind: A synthesis of empirical research on undergraduate and graduate women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 172–209.

Pearson, Jr., W., Frehill, L., and McNeely, C. (Eds.). (2015). Advancing Women in Science: An International Perspective. New York: Springer.

Polka, J. (2014). Where Will a Biology Ph.D. Take You? Infographic, American Society for Cell Biology. Available: http://www.ascb.org/compass/compass-points/where-will-a-biology-phd-take-you [September 19, 2017].

Pressman, L., Planting, M., Yuskavage, R. Okubo, S., Moyland, C. and Bond, J. (2017). The Economic Contribution of University/Nonprofit Inventions in the United States: 1996–2015. Available: https://www.autm.net/AUTMMain/media/Partner-Events/Documents/Economic-_Contribution_University-Nonprofit_Inventions_US_1996-2015_BIO_AUTM.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Rao, J. N. K., and Molina, I. (2015). Small Area Estimation. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Redline, C. (2013). Clarifying survey questions in a web survey. Public Opinion Quarterly, 77(Special Issue), 89–105.

Rivers, E. (2016). The Current NCSES Approach and an Overview of the NCSES Science and Engineering Education Surveys. Presentation prepared for the Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics Approach to Measuring the Science and Engineering Workforce, Washington, DC, April 25.

Roessner, D., Bond, J., Okubo, S., and Planting, M. (2017). The economic impact of licensed commercialized inventions originating in university research. Research Policy, 42(1), 23–34.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×

Rubio, D. M., Primack, B. A., Switzer, G. E., Bryce, C. L., Seltzer, D. L., and Kapoor, W. N. (2011). A comprehensive career-success model for physician-scientists. Academic Medicine, 86(12), 1571–1576. doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e31823592fd.

Rudd, E., Nerad, M., Emory, M., and Picciano, J. (2008). CIRGE Spotlight #2 on Doctoral Education: Professional Development for Ph.D. Student: Do They Really Need It? Findings from Social Science Ph.D.s—Five+ Years Out. Seattle, WA: CIRGE. Available: http://www.education.uw.edu/cirge/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/professional-skills-spotlight_10_07_08.pdf [October 15, 2017].

Rudd, E., Picciano, J., Nerad, M., and Cerny, J. (2010). The Influence of Postdoctoral Training on Prestige and Time in Academic Careers: Findings from Ph.D.’s—Ten Years Later, A National Survey of Ph.D. Careers. Report to the Alfred Sloan Foundation.

Sakshaug, J. W., Wolter, S., and Kreuter F. (2015). Obtaining record linkage consent: Results from a wording experiment in Germany. Survey Insights: Methods from the Field, November 13. Available: http://surveyinsights.org/?p=7288 [December 2017].

Sakshaug, J. W., Hülle, S., Schmucker, A., and Liebig, S. (2017). Exploring the effects of interviewer- and self-administered survey modes on record linkage consent rates and bias. Survey Research Methods, 11(2). doi:10.18148/srm/2017.v11i2.7158.

Schuman, H. (1966). The random probe: A technique for evaluating the validity of closed questions. American Sociological Review, 31(2), 218–222.

Slaughter, J. B., Tao, Y., and Pearson, W. Jr. (Eds.). (2015). Changing the Face of Engineering: The African American Experience. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Smith, P., Pont, M., and Jones, T. (2003). Developments in business survey methodology in the Office for National Statistics, 1994–2000. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series D (The Statistician), 52(3), 257–286. doi:10.1111/1467-9884.03571.

Smyth, J. D., Dillman, D. A., Christian, L. M., and Stern, M. J. (2006). Comparing check-all and forced-choice question formats in web surveys. Public Opinion Quarterly, 70(1), 66–77.

Smyth, J. D., Christian, L. M., and Dillman, D. A. (2008). Does “yes or no” on the telephone mean the same as check-all-that-apply on the web? Public Opinion Quarterly, 72(1), 103–111.

Steelman, J. R. (1949). Science and Public Policy: A Program for the Nation. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Stephan, P. E. (2009). Tracking the placement of students as a measure of technology transfer. In G. D. Libecap (Ed.), Measuring the Social Value of Innovation: A Link in the University Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship Equation (pp. 113–140). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group.

Stephan, P. E. (2011). The biomedical workforce in the U.S.: An example of positive feedbacks. In C. Antonelli (Ed.), Handbook on the Economic Complexity of Technological Change (pp. 240–261). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2006). Current Population Survey Design and Methodology. Technical Paper 66. Available: https://www.census.gov/prod/2006pubs/tp-66.pdf [September 20, 2017].

Weisberg, A., and Galinsky, E. (2014). Changing Families, Changing Work: A Paper for the Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of President Kennedy’s Commission on the Status of Women Report American Women. Washington, DC: Families and Work Institute. Available: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2642&context=key_workplace [December 2017].

West, B. T., Ghimire, D., and Axinn, W. G. (2015). Evaluating a modular design approach to collecting survey data using text messages. Survey Research Methods, 9(2), 111–123.

West, B. T., Sakshaug, J. W., and Aurelien, G. A. S. (2016). How big of a problem is analytic error in secondary analyses of survey data? PLoS One, 11(6), e0158120. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158120.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 123
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24968.
×
Page 124
Next: Appendix A Figures and Tables in the 2016 Science and Engineering Indicators Report That Use Data from the Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering, the Survey of Earned Doctorates, the National Survey of College Graduates, and the Survey of Doctorate Recipients »
Measuring the 21st Century Science and Engineering Workforce Population: Evolving Needs Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $60.00 Buy Ebook | $48.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), one of the nation’s principal statistical agencies, is charged to collect, acquire, analyze, report, and disseminate statistical data related to the science and engineering enterprise in the United States and other nations that is relevant and useful to practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and to the public. NCSES data, based primarily on several flagship surveys, have become the major evidence base for American science and technology policy, and the agency is well respected globally for these data.

This report assesses and provides guidance on NCSES’s approach to measuring the science and engineering workforce population in the United States. It also proposes a framework for measuring the science and engineering workforce in the next decade and beyond, with flexibility to examine emerging issues related to this unique population while at the same time allowing for stability in the estimation of key trends

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!