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Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25221.
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Page 180
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25221.
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Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25221.
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Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25221.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Open Session Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25221.
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Page 184

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  Appendix B Open Session Meeting Agendas Information-gathering sessions include in-person public meetings and webinars held by the committee from December 2017 to April 2018. They are listed in chronological order. The locations of in-person meetings are provided. Presentations that were made via the Internet at the in-person public meetings are noted. DECEMBER 1, 2017—FIRST PUBLIC MEETING The first in-person public meeting of the Committee on the Potential for Biotechnology to Address Forest Health was held at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, DC. Open Session Agenda December 1, 2017 10:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m. 10:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions Susan Offutt, Committee Chair, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Kara Laney, Study Director, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 10:45 a.m. U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities Michael Goergen, Vice President, Innovation, and Director, P3Nano 11:10 a.m. U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service Carlos Rodriguez Franco, Deputy Chief 11:35 a.m. U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Susan Koehler, Intergovernmental Agricultural Biotechnology Liaison 12:00 p.m. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency John Kough, Senior Scientist, Office of Pesticide Programs, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division 12:25 p.m. Lunch 1:30 p.m. U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Kevin Hackett, Senior National Program Leader, Crop Entomology 1:55 p.m. U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture Timothy Conner, Director, Division of Bioenergy 180 Prepublication Copy 

Appendix B 2:20 p.m. General Committee Discussion with Sponsors 2:45 p.m. Break 3:00 p.m. Public attitudes and Philosophical Perspectives on the Use of Biotechnology to Address Forest Health Evelyn Brister, Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology 3:30 p.m. Why Biotech Solutions Are Needed to Address Forest Health Steve Strauss, Professor, Oregon State University 4:00 p.m. Threats to and Efforts to Protect Acacia koa in Hawaii Dulal Borthakur, Professor, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa 4:30 p.m. How a Single Gene May Help Save the American Chestnut William A. Powell, Professor, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry 5:00 p.m. General Committee Discussion with Speakers 5:30 p.m. Public Comment Period 6:00 p.m. Adjourn Open Session DECEMBER 12, 2017—WEBINAR Tree Breeding for Forest Health—Current Successes. How Can Biotechnology Help? Richard Sniezko, U.S. Forest Service Emerald Ash Borer—The Complexities of a Catastrophic Invader Deb McCullough, Michigan State University Developing Genetically Diverse, Blight-Resistant American Chestnut Through Conventional Breeding and Genetic Engineering Jared Westbrook, The American Chestnut Foundation FEBRUARY 8, 2018—SECOND PUBLIC MEETING The second in-person public meeting of the Committee on the Potential for Biotechnology to Address Forest Health was held at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, DC. Open Session Agenda February 8, 2018 10:15 a.m.–3:15 p.m. 10:15 a.m. Welcome and Introductions Susan Offutt, Committee Chair, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Kara Laney, Study Director, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Prepublication Copy 181 

Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations 10:30 a.m. Kimberly F. Wallin, Research Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs, University of Vermont 10:50 a.m. James S. Clark, Nicholas Professor in Global Environmental Change and Professor of Statistical Science, Duke University 11:10 a.m. Gary M. Lovett (presenting remotely), Senior Scientist and Forest Ecologist, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 11:30 a.m. Discussion with Morning Session Speakers 12:15 p.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Robert L. Deal (presenting remotely), Research Forester and Ecosystem Services Team Leader, USDA–Forest Service 1:20 p.m. Robert J. Johnston, Professor of Economics and Director of George Perkins Marsh Institute, Clark University 1:40 p.m. Christine Dean, Vice President, Global Timberlands Technology (retired), Weyerhaeuser Anna Leon, Forest Pathologist, Weyerhaeuser 2:00 p.m. Discussion with Afternoon Session Speakers 2:45 p.m. Public Comment Period 3:15 p.m. Adjourn Open Session FEBRUARY 12, 2018—WEBINAR Using Genomic Tools to Understand and Manage Adaptation to Climate Sally Aitken, University of British Columbia FEBRUARY 22, 2018—WEBINAR ON POPLAR AND ASH Jennifer Koch, U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station Jared M. LeBoldus, Oregon State University FEBRUARY 23, 2018—WEBINAR ON PESTICIDE USE IN FORESTS John L. Kough, Office of Pesticide Programs, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division, Environmental Protection Agency Robyn Rose, USDA-APHIS, Plant Protection and Quarantine MARCH 2, 2018—WEBINAR ON INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVES ON THE USE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN FORESTS Neil Patterson, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry 182 Prepublication Copy 

Appendix B B.J. McManama, Indigenous Environmental Network Michael J. Dockry, U.S. Forest Service and University of Minnesota MARCH 5, 2018—FOREST ECOLOGY AT THE U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE William C. (Chuck) Hunter, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Marit Alanen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service MARCH 8, 2018—GE TREES AND THE U.S. REGULATORY SYSTEM Adam Costanza, Institute of Forest Biosciences Lori Knowles, University of Alberta and Institute of Forest Biosciences William (Bill) Doley, USDA-APHIS–Biotechnology Regulatory Services MARCH 8, 2018—ETHICS OF USING BIOTECHNOLOGY IN CONSERVATION Ron Sandler, Northeastern University Faith T. Campbell, Center for Invasive Species Prevention MARCH 27, 2018—RISKS, CONCERNS, AND POTENTIAL PROBLEMS REGARDING THE USE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY TO ADDRESS FOREST HEALTH Rachel Smolker, BiofuelWatch Anne Petermann, Global Justice Ecology Project Ruddy Turnstone, Global Justice Ecology Project MARCH 27, 2018—WHITEBARK PINE Diana F. Tomback, University of Colorado Denver APRIL 5, 2018—THIRD PUBLIC MEETING The third in-person public meeting of the Committee on the Potential for Biotechnology to Address Forest Health was held at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, DC. Open Session Agenda April 5, 2018 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m. 10:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions Susan Offutt, Committee Chair, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Kara Laney, Study Director, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Prepublication Copy 183 

Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations 10:50 a.m. Risk Assessment to Support Decision Making Katherine von Stackelberg, Research Scientist, Center for Health and the Global Environment and the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis 11:10 a.m. Importance of Incorporating Ecosystem Services Within the Context of Social-Ecological Systems Lawrence Kapustka, Senior Ecologist, LK Consultancy 11:30 a.m. Discussion with Morning Session Speakers 12:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Improved Assessment of Risks of Gene Flow in the Environment Nathalie Isabel, Research Scientist, Canadian Forest Service 1:20 p.m. Levels and Logics of Public and Stakeholder Support for the Use of Genomic Tools for Forest Adaptation Shannon Hagerman, Assistant Professor of Social-Ecological Systems, University of British Columbia 1:40 p.m. Discussion with All Speakers 2:45 p.m. Public Comment Period 3:00 p.m. Adjourn Open Session 184 Prepublication Copy 

Next: Appendix C: Biotech Tree Research and Development, 19872018 »
Forest Health and Biotechnology: Possibilities and Considerations Get This Book
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The American chestnut, whitebark pine, and several species of ash in the eastern United States are just a few of the North American tree species that have been functionally lost or are in jeopardy of being lost due to outbreaks of pathogens and insect pests. New pressures in this century are putting even more trees at risk. Expanded human mobility and global trade are providing pathways for the introduction of nonnative pests for which native tree species may lack resistance. At the same time, climate change is extending the geographic range of both native and nonnative pest species.

Biotechnology has the potential to help mitigate threats to North American forests from insects and pathogens through the introduction of pest-resistant traits to forest trees. However, challenges remain: the genetic mechanisms that underlie trees’ resistance to pests are poorly understood; the complexity of tree genomes makes incorporating genetic changes a slow and difficult task; and there is a lack of information on the effects of releasing new genotypes into the environment.

Forest Health and Biotechnology examines the potential use of biotechnology for mitigating threats to forest tree health and identifies the ecological, economic, and social implications of deploying biotechnology in forests. This report also develops a research agenda to address knowledge gaps about the application of the technology.

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