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Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
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Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
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Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 70

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PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Planning Committee Members and Presenters ADITYA ADIREDJA (Presenter) is an assistant professor of mathematics education in the Mathematics Department at the University of Arizona. His research interests lie at the intersection of mathematical cognition, equity, and undergraduate mathematics, and his work focuses on understanding ways that deficit social narratives along with our perspectives on knowledge and learning impact the way that we look at mathematical sense making by students of color. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of California, Berkeley. SUSAN BICKERSTAFF (Planning Committee Member) is a senior research associate with the Community College Research Center (CCRC). She conducts qualitative research on developmental education reform, teaching and learning, faculty learning and engagement, and student experiences at community colleges. Her dissertation focused on the experiences of adolescents at an urban community college. She has previously worked as a coordinator at a community-based adult education program and served as a research assistant on studies in family literacy. She holds a B.A. in community health from Brown University, an M.S. in education from Drexel University, and a Ph.D. in reading, writing, and literacy from the University of Pennsylvania. ANGELA BOATMAN (Presenter) is an assistant professor of public policy and higher education at Vanderbilt University. Her research explores the outcomes of policies designed to increase college completion for populations traditionally underrepresented in higher education. She is currently conducting several studies on the impact of innovations in the delivery of remedial courses. She is a faculty affiliate of the Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Readiness (CAPR), housed at the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, and an affiliate of the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard University. Boatman holds an Ed.D. with a concentration in higher education from Harvard University. LINDA BRADDY (Planning Committee Member) is vice president for academic affairs at Tarrant County College (TCC) Northeast Campus. She previously served as deputy executive director of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) in Washington, DC. She was formerly dean of the Division of Health and Natural Sciences at TCC’s South Campus and before that, dean of the Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences on South Campus. Braddy has also been a professor in and chair of the Department of Mathematics at East Central University (ECU) in Ada, Oklahoma, where she directed professional development programs for K–12 mathematics teachers and other grant-funded initiatives to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Oklahoma, with a research focus in undergraduate mathematics education. CHRISTINE BRONGNIART (Presenter) is the interim university executive director of the City University of New York’s (CUNY’s) Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP). She was formerly the national director of funded initiatives at the Girl Scouts of the USA, where she developed and scaled leadership development programs for girls impacted by the criminal justice system. She holds a B.A. in psychology from the University of Notre Dame, and an M.S. in nonprofit management from the New School University. PAMELA BURDMAN (Presenter) is the senior project director for The Opportunity Institute and founder of the Just Equations project. Working at the intersection of education research, policy, and 64

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS practice, Burdman synthesizes knowledge from the field to define problems and advance strategies that support student success. Burdman has authored several reports and numerous articles on the role of mathematics as a gateway to educational opportunity, including the three-part Degrees of Freedom series. As a program officer for the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, she created and implemented the foundation’s investment strategies for strengthening college readiness and community college student success in California, helping to generate several statewide initiatives that continue today. TRISTAN DENLEY (Planning Committee Member) currently serves as executive vice chancellor for academic affairs and chief academic officer at the University System of Georgia. His recent work focuses on transforming developmental education and advising at a system scale, and uses a data-informed approach to implement a wide variety of system scale initiatives surrounding college completion. Previous positions include vice chancellor for academic affairs at the Tennessee Board of Regents, vice president for academic affairs at Austin Peay State University, and chair of Mathematics and senior fellow of the Residential College program at the University of Mississippi. He is the creator of Degree Compass, a course recommendation system that pairs current students with the courses that best fit their talents and program of study for upcoming semesters. In 2007, he was chosen as a Redesign Scholar by the National Center for Academic Transformation for his work in rethinking the teaching of freshman mathematics classes. Denley earned his Ph.D. in mathematics from Trinity College, University of Cambridge. JAMES DORSEY (Planning Committee Member) is president and chief executive officer of College Success Foundation (CSF), where his work focuses on improving educational equity for underserved students. This includes leadership of national, statewide, and campus-based programs with a focus on promoting historically underrepresented communities into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, as well as the expansion of CSF’s college services program, which leverages a unique combination of individualized advising and broad-based online and digital resources to support CSF scholars to college completion. Previously, he was executive director of Washington Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) and president of MESA USA where his leadership and work involved cultivating strategic partnerships leadership with the aim of improving educational outcomes for diverse student populations. Dorsey has a B.S. in geology and an M.A from California State University, Chico. AMY GETZ (Presenter) is the manager for systems implementation for higher education at The University of Texas at Austin, where she leads a team that develops tools and services to support local leaders and works with external organizations to coordinate and mobilize efforts to support math pathways. Her work focuses on supporting systems and institutions to modernize entry-level college mathematics programs, and ranges from addressing obstacles in state policy to changing institutional practices and improving mathematics curriculum and instruction. She led the development of the Quantway™ curriculum in partnership with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. As the founding director of the Freshman Mathematics Program at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, she taught developmental and freshman-level math and led curriculum redesign that resulted in significant improvements in student success in both developmental and college-level math courses. Getz holds a B.A. in English theatre from Fort Lewis College and an M.A in secondary school counseling from Adams State College. HOWARD GOBSTEIN (Planning Committee Chair) is the executive vice president of the Association of Public & Land-grant Universities, where he is responsible for research policy and STEM education— with their affiliated groups and portfolio of funded projects. His past positions include associate vice president for governmental affairs and director of federal relations at Michigan State University, senior policy analyst in the Office of Science and Technology in the Executive Office of the President, vice president and senior program officer at the Association of American Universities and director of federal 65

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS    relations for research at the University of Michigan. He has also designed and led evaluations of government science programs and policies with the U.S. Government Accountability Office. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He earned a B.S. in interdisciplinary engineering at Purdue University and an M.A. in science, technology, and public policy at The George Washington University. MARK GREEN (Presenter) is a distinguished research professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles. He was a founding co-director and later director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and of the American Mathematical Society. Green served as vice-chair of the Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics study on The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. He serves on the Board of Governors of Transforming Postsecondary Education in Math and served on the Advisory Committee of the Association for Women in Mathematics. He is the chair of the National Academies’ Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics and is the host for its monthly Mathematical Frontiers webinar. JOHN HETTS (Presenter) is the senior director of data science at Educational Results Partnership and a member of the Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP) research team, the California Guided Pathways Advisory Committee, and the statewide AB705 Implementation Workgroup in California. He is also a Complete College America Fellow and a California Educational Policy Fellow. Formerly, he was the director of institutional research at Long Beach City College during its implementation of multiple measures-based assessment. His work on predictive modeling of student assessment and placement won the 2012 RP Group Best College Research Award (with Andrew Fuenmayor and Karen Rothstein), the 2014 Association of California Community College Administrators Mertes Award (with Andrew Fuenmayor), and the 2015 RP Group Best Statewide Research Award (as part of the MMAP research team). He received his Ph.D. in social psychology with a specialization in measurement and psychometrics for the University of California, Los Angeles, and holds a B.A. with Distinction and Honors from Stanford University. MICHELLE HODARA (Presenter) is a manager of research and evaluation at Education Northwest. Hodara leads a Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Northwest research-practice partnership that brings together Oregon education stakeholders from across sectors to focus on high school graduation and postsecondary success and is also the applied research lead for the REL, helping to support authors with conceptualizing and conducting their research studies. Hodara is trained in quantitative methods for program evaluation, and much of her research and evaluation focuses on postsecondary readiness and success and key issues affecting community colleges, including developmental education. Prior to earning her doctorate, she was a special education teacher in Zuni, New Mexico, and a developmental education instructor at the University of New Mexico-Gallup. Hodara holds a Ph.D. in economics and education from Teachers College, Columbia University. AMY KERWIN (Presenter) is the Vice President of Education Philanthropy at Ascendium Education Group. In this role, she leads the implementation of Ascendium’s philanthropic strategy to elevate opportunities and outcomes for learners from low-income backgrounds so they can better achieve the postsecondary education and career goals that matter most to them. Prior to joining Ascendium in 1994, Kerwin spent four years as an auditor at EY. She is both a Certified Public Accountant and a Certified Internal Auditor. Kerwin serves on the boards of Grantmakers for Education and the Wisconsin Philanthropy Network and is a member of the Wisconsin Governor’s Council on Financial Literacy. She holds a B. S. in accountancy from the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. 66   

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS JEANETTE KIM (Presenter) is currently the interim university assistant dean for prematriculation programs and program assessment at CUNY, overseeing three major pre-matriculation program areas: CUNY Start, the Adult Literacy Programs, and the CUNY Language Immersion Programs. She also oversees the Research, Evaluation, and Program Support (REPS) team, which provides program evaluation services to more than 30 different programs administered by CUNY’s Central Office. Previous positions include assistant dean for high school partnerships at State University of New York (SUNY) Westchester Community College (WCC) and deputy director of collaborative programs at CUNY, where she was responsible for the management and oversight of CUNY’s dual enrollment and pre‐college STEM initiatives. Kim has a B.S. in biology and chemistry from SUNY Albany and an M.A. in educational administration and policy from Teachers College, Columbia University. KARON KLIPPLE (Presenter) is executive director of the Carnegie Math Pathways program at WestEd networked improvement community of more than 100 colleges across the country working collectively (formerly at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.) In this role she leads a to help students learn mathematics in ways that emphasize practical skills that will serve them in the future. She is part of the core team that launched this network in 2010, and under her leadership, the program’s outcomes have continued to increase as it has scaled to tens of thousands of students across a variety of instructional settings. Klipple has almost 20 years of experience in teaching and mathematics program reform, most recently at San Diego City College where she was associate professor of mathematics, and 5 years of experience as a product manager for scientific software. She has taught statistics and mathematics at the community college, high school, and university level. She holds a B.A. in mathematics from Trinity University and a Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University. TATIANA MELGUIZO (Planning Committee Member) is an associate professor in the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education. She works in the field of economics of higher education. She uses quantitative methods of analysis and large-scale longitudinal survey data to study the association of different factors such as student trajectories and specific institutional characteristics on the persistence and educational outcomes of minority (African American and Hispanic) and low-income students. She is a recipient of the American Education Research Association (AERA) dissertation grant as well as grants from the Institute of Education Sciences, Spencer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Jack Kent Cooke, Nellie Mae, and Lumina Foundations, the Association for Institutional Research, and the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative. Melguizo received her M.A. in social policy from the London School of Economics and her Ph.D. in economics of education from Stanford University. VILMA MESA (Planning Committee Member) is associate professor of education, faculty associate at the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, and associate professor of mathematics at the University of Michigan. She investigates the role that resources play in developing teaching expertise in undergraduate mathematics, specifically at community colleges and in inquiry-based learning classrooms. She has conducted several analyses of instruction and of textbooks and collaborated in evaluation projects on the impact of innovative mathematics teaching practices for students in STEM. She has been principal investigator in National Science Foundation and Institute for Education Sciences funded projects, a Fulbright Scholar, and a research associate at “una empresa docente,” a research center in mathematics education at the University of Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, where she co-authored university textbooks for pre-calculus for engineering and probability and statistics for social science majors. She holds a B.S. in computer science and a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, and an M.A and a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Georgia. NYEMA MITCHELL (Presenter) is a senior program manager with Jobs for the Future’s (JFF’s) postsecondary team, which works to improve student success by helping states and their community colleges dramatically increase the number of students who complete college and earn high-value 67

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS credentials. Mitchell supports the national network of Student Success Centers. This work includes designing and developing services and supporting data collection and program evaluation, as well as targeted coaching and technical assistance. Prior to joining JFF, she was a researcher with the Center for Education Policy at SRI International. Mitchell has an M.S. in public policy from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a B.A. in education studies and public policy from Brown University. TOBY PARK-GAGHAN (Presenter) is an associate professor of economics of education and education policy in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, and associate director of the Center for Postsecondary Success. Park-Gaghan’s primary research utilizes quasi-experimental methods and large statewide data sets to investigate student outcomes in postsecondary education and explore potential policy initiatives that could improve student success. Park-Gaghan is co-principal investigator on a multi-year project investigating developmental education reform in Florida, funded in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Institute for Education Sciences. Park-Gaghan holds a Ph.D. in education policy from Vanderbilt University, and an M.Ed. in higher education management and a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Pittsburgh. JULIE PHELPS (Planning Committee Member) is the Lockheed Martin Chair of Mathematics, professor of mathematics, and developmental mathematics coordinator at Valencia College. Her research focuses on ways to increase student engagement, learning, retention, self-efficacy, and success among mathematics students in the first 2 years of college. She has served as project director of Achieving the Dream, where she focused on identifying and closing achievement gaps across racial and ethnic groups, between college-ready and under-prepared students, and between student success in mathematics and other discipline courses. Phelps has also served in the appointed role as Communication Liaison for American Mathematics Association for Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) in connection to developmental mathematics pathways redesign and is now the chair of the AMATYC Mathematics Standards Committee. Phelps holds a B.S. from Florida Southern College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction, specializing in community college from the University of Central Florida. RAHIM RAJAN (Presenter) is the deputy director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He leads and manages a diverse portfolio focused on helping faculty and students at postsecondary institutions benefit from high quality, personalized digital learning. Grants that Rajan has helped launched or manage include Next Generation Learning Challenges, Next Generation Courseware Challenge, and the Adaptive Learning Market Acceleration Program. Prior to this, Rajan helped in the launch, growth, and management of three not-for-profit technology start-up organizations (JSTOR, ITHAKA, Aluka) that have transformed how higher education and cultural/research institutions around the world access, preserve, and distribute online scholarly research, monographs, primary sources, and literature. Rajan earned an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge and his B.A. in philosophy from the University of Chicago. MAXINE ROBERTS (Presenter) is dedicated to advancing system-changing, equity-focused initiatives for students who are traditionally marginalized in higher education. She has directed youth-based programs in New York City, worked with community college faculty in California to improve their course outcomes, and conducted research on the factors that contribute to success and progress for students of color in developmental mathematics. Currently, she serves as the assistant director of knowledge management for Strong Start to Finish at the Education Commission of the States. She was the recipient of the 2017–2018 AERA Minority Dissertation fellowship and the 2018 Rossier Dissertation Award of Merit. Roberts holds a Ph.D. in urban education policy from the University of Southern California and an M.A in reading and literacy specialization and English education from Bank Street College of Education and Teachers College, Columbia University. JOANNA SÁNCHEZ (Presenter) is the program manager for the Seal of Excelencia in Education. She manages the development of the Seal and Ladder of Engagement portfolio and works with institutions 68

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS committed to better serving Latino students. A first-generation college graduate and Gates Millennium Scholar, Sánchez recently completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at Howard University funded by the National Science Foundation. Previously she served as a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) professional in both the private and public sectors, including teaching GIS at South Texas College. She holds a Ph.D. in educational leadership and policy at The University of Texas at Austin, as well as an M.A. in GIS from the University of Denver and a B.S. in geosciences from Trinity University. LAUREN SCHUDDE (Presenter) is an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy at The University of Texas (UT) at Austin. She is also a faculty research affiliate of the UT's Population Research Center and Charles A. Dana Center and Teachers College's Community College Research Center. Her research examines the impact of educational policies and practices on college student outcomes, with ongoing projects focused on how community college students respond to institutional transfer policies and the influence of dev-ed math reform on student outcomes. Her work has been published in the Sociology of Education, Journal of Human Resources, AERA Open, Review of Research in Education, Review of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and Community College Review. Schudde received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. APRIL STROM (Presenter) has taught mathematics at the community college level for more than 20 years. She is currently a member of the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction and serves as the AMATYC Southwest Vice President. She has served as PI and co-PI on various NSF-funded projects focused on both research in mathematics education and professional development of K–14 instructors. Strom also co-lead the writing of the Classroom Practices chapter of the MAA Instructional Practices Guide and served on the steering committee for the AMATYC IMPACT guide. She received her Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction (emphasis in mathematics education) from Arizona State University and holds an M.A. and a B.A. in mathematics from Texas Tech University. PHILIP URI TREISMAN (Planning Committee Member) is a University Distinguished Teaching Professor, professor of mathematics, and professor of public affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. He is the founder and executive director of the University’s Charles A. Dana Center, and launched the Dana Center Mathematics Pathways. Treisman is a founding member of Transforming Post-Secondary Education in Mathematics and serves as the representative of the American Mathematical Society to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Education, Section Q). He created the Urban Mathematics Leadership Network, has served as a distinguished senior fellow at the Education Commission of the States since 2013, and is currently the chairman of the Strong Start to Finish Campaign. He has served on the STEM working group of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, on the 21st-Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges of the American Association of Community Colleges, and on the Commission on Mathematics and Science Education of the Carnegie Corporation of New York Institute for Advanced Study. Treisman holds a Ph.D. in mathematics and education from the University of California, Berkeley. PAULA WILHITE (Presenter) leads instruction in mathematics, physics, and engineering as division chair and professor of mathematics at Northeast Texas Community College where she is a charter faculty member. Wilhite’s work actively supports the reform movement in developmental mathematics, with its focus on teaching mathematics to students in underserved populations and its emphasis on active learning, constructive persistence, and interdisciplinary application. She has served as the principle investigator for a National Science Foundation scholarship grant for students who are eligible for a federal Pell Grant. Wilhite was a member of the Course Design Team for the Mathways Project developed by the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin. She was awarded the 2004 Texas Mathematical Teaching Excellence Award and the 2013 AMATYC Teaching Excellence Award. Since 2016, she has served as chair of the AMATYC Developmental Mathematics Committee (DMC), which provides a forum for the exchange of ideas to improve the quality of developmental mathematics programs in the first two years of college. 69

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS ELIZABETH ZACHRY RUTSCHOW (Presenter) is a senior research associate at MDRC where she leads research on developmental education, adult basic education, and GED preparation. She is the director of several projects in these areas: (1) an evaluation of the Dana Center Mathematics Pathways; (2) an examination of implementation and sustainability of paid internships in 33 colleges in the Midwest; and (3) a scan of promising adult basic education programs in California. She also serves as the lead for reports examining the revision of developmental education assessment and instruction across the United States, as part of the Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Readiness (CAPR). She has authored numerous reports, including two literature reviews analyzing the most promising reforms in developmental and adult education (Unlocking the Gate and Beyond the GED). Prior to joining MDRC, she worked as a researcher and teacher in adult literacy education and served as a doctoral fellow at the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy at Harvard Graduate School of Education. She holds an Ed.D. and an M.E. in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. 70

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The Board on Science Education and the Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics on March 18-19, 2019. The Workshop explored how to best support all students in postsecondary mathematics, with particular attention to students who are unsuccessful in developmental mathematics and with an eye toward issues of access to promising reforms and equitable learning environments.

The two-day workshop was designed to bring together a variety of stakeholders, including experts who have developed and/or implemented new initiatives to improve the mathematics education experience for students. The overarching goal of the workshop was to take stock of the mathematics education community's progress in this domain. Participants examined the data on students who are well-served by new reform structures in developmental mathematics and discussed various cohorts of students who are not currently well served - those who even with access to reforms do not succeed and those who do not have access to a reform due to differential access constraints. Throughout the workshop, participants also explored promising approaches to bolstering student outcomes in mathematics, focusing especially on research and data that demonstrate the success of these approaches; deliberated and discussed barriers and opportunities for effectively serving all students; and outlined some key directions of inquiry intended to address the prevailing research and data needs in the field. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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