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Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
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Page 58
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25547.
×
Page 59

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS References Aguirre, J.M., Mayfield-Ingram, K., & Martin, D.B. (2013). The impact of identity in K-8 mathematics: Rethinking equity-based practices. Reston: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges. (2018). IMPACT: Improving mathematical prowess and college teaching. https://c.ymcdn.com/sites/amatyc.site- ym.com/resource/resmgr/impact/AMATYC_IMPACT.pdf. Boatman, A. (2019, March). Differential impacts of developmental math by level of academic need. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Boatman, A., & Long, B. T. (2018). Does remediation work for all students?: How the effects of postsecondary remedial and developmental courses vary by level of academic preparation. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 40(1), 29-58. Brongniart, C. (2019, March). CUNY ASAP: Comprehensive program components. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Burdman, P. (2018). The mathematics of opportunity: Rethinking the role of mathematics in educational equity. https://justequations.org/wp-content/uploads/je-report-r12-web.pdf. Charles A. Dana Center. (2018). A call to action—mathematics pathways: Scaling and sustaining. Retrieved from Dana Center Math Pathways website: https://dcmathpathways.org/resources/call- action-mathematics-pathways-scaling-and-sustaining-notes-and-references-supplement. Charles A. Dana Center. (2019). What is rigor in mathematics really? https://www.utdanacenter.org/sites/default/files/2019-02/what-is-rigor-in-mathematics.pdf. Chen, X. (2016). Remedial coursetaking at U.S. public 2- and 4-year institutions: Scope, experiences, and outcomes (NCES 2016-405). Retrieved from the National Center for Education Statistics website: https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016405.pdf. Denley, T. (2019, March). Co-requisite mathematics. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, D.C. Fields, R., & Parsad, B. (2012). Test and cut scores used for student placement in postsecondary education: Fall 2011. Retrieved from the National Assessment Governing Board website: https://www.nagb.gov/content/nagb/assets/documents/commission/researchandresources/test-and cut-scores-used-for-student-placement-in-postsecondary-education-fall-2011.pdf. Fong, K. E., Melguizo, T., & Prater, G. (2015). Increasing success rates in developmental math: The complementary role of individual and institutional characteristics. Research in Higher Education, 56(7), 719-749. Getz, A. (2019, March). Dana Center Mathematics Pathways: Prepare, enable, empower. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Gutierrez, R. (2007). (Re)defining equity: The importance of a critical perspective. In Diversity, equity, and access to mathematical ideas. New York: Teachers College Press. Hatano, G., & Inagaki, K. (1986). Two courses of expertise. In H. W. Stevenson, H. Azuma, & K. Hakuta (Eds.), A series of books in psychology. Child development and education in Japan (pp. 262-272). New York: W.H. Freeman/Times Books/Henry Holt & Co. Hetts, J. (2019, March). Let Icarus fly: Multiple measures in assessment, the re-imagination of student capacity, and the road to college level for all. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Hodara, M. (2019, March). Understanding the developmental mathematics population: Findings from a nationally representative sample of first-time college entrants. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Hu, S., Park, T., Mokher, C., Spencer, H., Hu, X., & Bertrand Jones, T. (2019). Increasing momentum for 58

PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS student success: Developmental education redesign and student progress in Florida. Retrieved from FSU’s Digital Repository website: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1550948148_bd6a2f97. Jenkins Webber, A. (2018). Starting to succeed: The impact of CUNY Start on academic momentum— gateway course completion. https://www2.cuny.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/media- assets/gateway_brief_final.pdf. Kim, J. (2019, March). CUNY Start: Maximizing the pre-matriculation space to address remedial needs. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Klipple, K. (2019, March). Carnegie Math Pathways, WestEd. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Larnell, G. (2016). More than just skill: Examining mathematics identities, racialized narratives, and remediation among black undergraduates. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 47(3), 233-269. Liston, C., & Getz, A. (2019). The case for mathematics pathways. http://dcmathpathways.org/sites/default/files/resources/2019- 03/CaseforMathPathways_20190313.pdf. Mathematical Association of America. (2018). MAA instructional practices guide. https://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/InstructPracGuideweb.pdf. MMAP Team. (2018). AB705 success rates estimates technical paper: Estimating success rates for students placed directly into transfer-level English and math courses. The RP Group. https://rpgroup.org/Portals/0/Documents/Projects/MultipleMeasures/Publications/MMAP_AB705 _TechnicalPaper_FINAL_091518.pdf. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2019). Catalyzing change for elementary school. Teaching Children Mathematics, 25(5), 282-288. National Research Council. (2013). The Mathematical Sciences in 2025. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Schudde, L. (2019, March). Who gets access to reformed dev-ed math? Evidence from Dana Center Mathematics Pathways. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Schudde, L., & Keisler, K. (2019). The relationship between accelerated dev-ed coursework and early college milestones: Examining college momentum in a reformed mathematics pathway. American Educational Research Association Open, 5(1), 1-22. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/2332858419829435. Scrivener, S., Gupta, H., Weiss, M. J., Cohen, B., Cormier, M. S., & Brathwaite, J. (2018). Becoming college ready. https://www.mdrc.org/sites/default/files/CUNY_START_Interim_Report_FINAL_0.pdf. Strom, A. (2019, March). Focusing on high quality instruction. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Education. (2017). Developmental education: Challenges and strategies for reform. Washington, DC: Office of Planning Evaluation and Policy Development. Xu, D., & Dadgar, M. (2018). How effective are community college remedial math courses for students with the lowest math skills? Community College Review, 46(1), 62-81. Xu, D., & Jaggars, S. S. (2014). Performance gaps between online and face-to-face courses: Differences across types of students and academic subject areas. The Journal of Higher Education, 85(5), 633-659. Zachry Rutschow, E. (2019, March). Reforms in developmental mathematics. Presented at the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, Washington, DC. Zachry Rutschow, E. & Mayer, A. (2018). Early findings from a national survey on developmental education practices. New York: CAPR. 59

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The Board on Science Education and the Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened the Workshop on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics on March 18-19, 2019. The Workshop explored how to best support all students in postsecondary mathematics, with particular attention to students who are unsuccessful in developmental mathematics and with an eye toward issues of access to promising reforms and equitable learning environments.

The two-day workshop was designed to bring together a variety of stakeholders, including experts who have developed and/or implemented new initiatives to improve the mathematics education experience for students. The overarching goal of the workshop was to take stock of the mathematics education community's progress in this domain. Participants examined the data on students who are well-served by new reform structures in developmental mathematics and discussed various cohorts of students who are not currently well served - those who even with access to reforms do not succeed and those who do not have access to a reform due to differential access constraints. Throughout the workshop, participants also explored promising approaches to bolstering student outcomes in mathematics, focusing especially on research and data that demonstrate the success of these approaches; deliberated and discussed barriers and opportunities for effectively serving all students; and outlined some key directions of inquiry intended to address the prevailing research and data needs in the field. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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