National Academies Press: OpenBook

Powering the U.S. Army of the Future (2021)

Chapter: Appendix N: Acronyms List

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix N: Acronyms List." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Powering the U.S. Army of the Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26052.
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Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix N: Acronyms List." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Powering the U.S. Army of the Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26052.
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Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix N: Acronyms List." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Powering the U.S. Army of the Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26052.
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Page 151

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N Acronyms List ABCT armored brigade combat team ACE Advanced Combat Engine ACT Advanced Combat Transmission AECP All Electric Combat Powertrain AISG APD Integrated Starter/Generator AMEP Advanced Mobility Experimental Prototype AMMPS Advanced Medium Mobile Power Source APD Advanced Powertrain Demonstrator APOP Advanced Propulsion with On-board Power APU auxiliary power unit ARL Army Research Laboratory ARPA-E Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy ATJ alcohol-to-jet ATM(S) Advanced Thermal Management (System) ATTAM Advanced Turbine Technologies for Affordable Mission-Capability BEV battery electric vehicle; all-battery electric vehicle BOARD Board on Army Research and Development BOP balance of the plant CAD Computer Aided Design CASCOM Combined Arms Support Command CNG compressed natural gas DASA(RT) Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology DF1 Diesel Fuel 1 DoD Department of Defense DOE (U.S.) Department of Energy DPGDS Deployable Power Generation and Distribution system DSB Defense Science Board EC electrochemical capacitors EDLC electrolytic double-layer capacitors PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION N-1

EIO Energy-Informed Operations EV electric vehicle FOB forwad operating base FY fiscal year GCI gasoline compression ignition GVSC (U.S. Army DEVCOM) Ground Vehicle Systems Center HMMWV High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (i.e. “Humvee”) ICE internal combustion engine IoT Internet of Things ISG Integrated Starter Generator JCESR Joint Center for Energy Storage Research JLTV Joint Light Tactical Vehicle JP8 Jet Propellant 8 LNG liquefied natural gas LSCF lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite LW Land Warrior MANET mobile ad hoc networks MDO Multi-Domain Operations MEPS Mobile Electric Power Solutions MMC metal matrix composite MNR micro nuclear reactor or modular nuclear reactor MOF metal-organic frameworks MOTS military on-the-shelf MUTT Multi-Utility Tactical Transport NATO The North Atlantic Treaty Organization NSRC Network Science Research Center OPLOG Operational logistics P&E power and energy PEM Platform Electrification Mobility PEM proton-exchange membrane or polymer electrolyte membrane PFTE polytetrafluoroethylene PPU Prime Power Unit PV Photovoltaic PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION N-2

RCV remote control vehicles RDECOM U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command RTG Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator SiRPA silica-reinforced porous, anodized aluminum SMET small multi-purpose equipment transport SOFC solid oxide fuel cell SSP soldier silent power STAMP Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power TBC thermal barrier coating TESU Tactical Energy Storage Unit TIG Transmission Integrated Generator TMS Tactical Microgrid Standard TPV thermophotovoltaic TRISO tri-structural isotropic TVEK (U.S. Army) Tactical Vehicle Electrification Kit UAV unmanned aerial vehicle UGV unmanned ground vehicle USD(AT&L) Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics VEA Vehicle Electric Architecture VMD Vehicle Mobile Demonstrator YSZ yttria-stabilized zirconia PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION N-3

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At the request of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, Powering the U.S. Army of the Future examines the U.S. Army's future power requirements for sustaining a multi-domain operational conflict and considers to what extent emerging power generation and transmission technologies can achieve the Army's operational power requirements in 2035. The study was based on one operational usage case identified by the Army as part of its ongoing efforts in multi-domain operations. The recommendations contained in this report are meant to help inform the Army's investment priorities in technologies to help ensure that the power requirements of the Army's future capability needs are achieved.

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