National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 8 Supporting Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

References

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1998). Blueprints for Science Literacy. New York: Oxford University Press.

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989). Science for All Americans. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1990). This Year in School Science 1990: Assessment in the Service of Instruction. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

American Psychological Association and Mid-Continent Regional Educational Laboratory. (1993). Learner-Centered Psychological Principles: Guidelines for School Redesign and Reform. Denver: Mid-Continent Regional Educational Laboratory.

Anderson, C. W., & Smith, E. L. (1987). Teaching Science. In Koehler-Richardson (Ed), Educators’ Handbook: A Research Perspective (pp. 84-111). White Plains, NY: Longman.

Anderson, R. D. (1996). Study of Curriculum Reform. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Atkin, J. M., & Karplus, R. (1962). Discovery or Invention. The Science Teacher, 29(2), 121-143.

Atwater, B. F. (1987). Evidence for Great Holocene Earthquakes Along the Outer Coast of Washington State. Science, 236, 942-944.

Baron, J. B. (1990). Performance Assessment: Blurring the Edges among Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction. In A. B. Champagne, B. E. Lovitts, & B. J. Calinger (Eds), Assessment in the Service of Instruction: This Year in School Science 1990. Washington, DC: AAAS.

Basaga, H., Geban, O., & Tekkaya, C. (1994). The Effect of the Inquiry Teaching Method on Biochemistry and Science Process Skill Achievements. Biochemical Education, 22(1), 29-32.

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998a). Assessment and Classroom Learning. Assessment in Education, 5(1), 7-74.

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998b). Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards through Classroom Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139-148.

Blank, R. (Chair, CCSSO/SCASS Science Team for Measures of the Enacted Curriculum). (1997). How is Science Taught in Schools? Washington, DC: CCSSO.

Blumenfeld, P. C. (1994). Lessons Learned: How Collaboration Helped Middle Grade Science Teachers Learn Project-based Instruction. The Elementary School Journal, 94(5), 539-551.

Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L., & Cocking, R., (Eds). (1999). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Bredderman, T. (1982). Elementary School Science Process Programs: A Meta-analysis of Evaluation Studies. (Final Report of NSF-RISE Grant SED 18717).

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

Bruer, J. T. (1993). Schools for Thought. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bybee, R. W. (1997). Achieving Scientific Literary: From Purposes to Practices. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Bybee, R. W., & DeBoer, G. (1993). Goals for the Science Curriculum. In Handbook of Research on Science Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: National Science Teachers Association.

Byrnes, J. P. (1996). Cognitive Development and Learning in Instructional Contexts. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Calhoun, E. F. (1994). How to Use Action Research in the Self-Renewing School. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Carpenter, T., Fennema, E., & Franke, M. (1996). Cognitively Guided Instruction: A Knowledge Base for Reform in Primary Mathematics Instruction. Elementary School Journal, 97(1), 3-20.

Champagne, A. B., Kouba, V. L., & Hurley, M. (In press). Assessing Inquiry. Albany, NY: State University of New York.

Cochran, K. F. (1992) Pedagogical content knowledge: Teachers’ Transformations of Subject Matter. In F. Lawrenz, K. Cochran, J. Krajcik, & P. Simpson (Eds), Research Matters…To the Science Teacher. Monograph Number Five of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching.

Council of Chief State School Officers. (1999). Guide to Scoring LEP Student Responses to Open-Ended Science Items. Washington, DC: SCASS LEP Consortium Project, CCSSO.

Daro, P. (1996). Standards and Portfolio Assessment . In J. B. Baron & D. P. Wolf (Eds), Performance-Based Student Assessment: Challenges and Possibilities (pp. 239-260). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

De Jong, T., & Van Joolingen, W. R. (1998). Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations of Conceptual Domains. Review of Educational Research, 68(2), 179-201.

DeBoer, G. E. (1991). A History of Ideas in Science Education: Implications for Practice. New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University.

Delpit, L. (1995). Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom. New York: W.W. Norton.

Dewey, J. [1933 (1910)]. How We Think. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath.

Donovan, M. S., Bransford, J. D., & Pellegrino, J. W. (Eds). (1999). How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Driver, R., Guesni, E., & Tiberghiem, A. (1985). Children’s Ideas in Science. Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Driver, R., Squires, A., Duck, P., & Wood-Robinson, V. (1994). Making Sense of Secondary Sciences: Research into Children’s Ideas. London: Routledge.

Duckworth, E. (1987). The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning. New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia University.

Duschl, R. A. (1992). Teaching of Theory: A Guiding Concept in Science Education. Chapter IX in Teaching About the History and Nature of Science and Technology: Background Papers. Colorado Springs: Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS).

Duschl, R. A., & Gitomer, D. H. (1991). Epistemological Perspectives on Conceptual Change: Implications for Educational Practice. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28(9), 839-858.

Duschl, R. A., & Gitomer, D. H. (1997). Strategies and Challenges to Changing the Focus of Assessment and Instruction in Science Classrooms. Educational Assessment, 4(1), 37-73.

Flick, L. B. (1995). Complex Classrooms: A Synthesis of Research on Inquiry Teaching Methods and Explicit Teaching Strategies. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching, San Francisco (ED 383 563).

Fradd, S. H., & Lee, O. (1999). Teachers’ Roles in Promoting Science Inquiry with Students from Diverse Language Backgrounds. Educational Researcher, 28(6), 14-42.

Fullan, M. G. (1993). Change Forces: Probing the Depths of Education Reform. New York: The Falmer Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

Fullan, M. G. (1991). The New Meaning of Educational Change. New York: Teachers College Press.

Gallas, K. (1995). Talking Their Way Into Science: Hearing Children’s Questions and Theories, Responding with Curricula. New York: Teachers College Press.

Gitomer, D. H., & Duschl, R. A. (1995). Moving Toward a Portfolio Culture in Science Education. In M. S. Glynn & R. Duit (Eds), Learning Science in the Schools: Research Reforming Practice (pp. 299-325). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Glaser, R. (1992). Expert Knowledge and Process of Thinking. In D. F. Halpern (Ed), Enhancing Thinking Skills in Science and Mathematics (pp. 63-75). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Guskey, T. R. (1986). Staff Development and the Process of Teacher Change. Educational Researcher, 15(5), 5-12.

Hall, G. E., & Hord, S. M. (1987). Change in Schools: Facilitating the Process. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Harms, N., & Kahl, S. (1980). Project Synthesis: Final Report to The National Science Foundation. Boulder, CO: University of Colorado.

Harms, N., & Yager, R. E. (1981). What Research Says to the Science Teacher, Vol. 3. Washington, DC: National Science Teachers Association.

Hashweh, M. Z. (1987) Effects of Subject Matter Knowledge in the Teaching of Biology and Physics. Teaching and Teacher Education, 3, 109-120.

Haury, D. L. (1993). Teaching Science Through Inquiry. ERIC CSMEE Digest (March Ed 359 048).

Herbart, J. (1901). Outlines of Education Doctrine, C. DeGarmo (Trans); A. Lange (Ed). New York: Macmillan.

Hewson, P. W., & Thorley, N. R. (1989). The Conditions of Conceptual Change in the Classroom. International Journal of Science Education, 11(5), 541-553.

Heywood, J., & Heywood, S. (1992). The Training of Student-Teachers in Discovery Methods of Instruction and Learning. (No. 1/92) ED 358 034. Dublin, Ireland: Department of Teacher Education, The University of Dublin.

Hiebert, J. (1999). Relationship Between Research and the NCTM Standards. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 30(1), 3-19.

Holly, P. (1991). Action Research: The Missing Link in the Creation of Schools as Centers of Inquiry. In A. Lieberman & L. Miller (Eds), Staff Development for Education in the ’90s: New Demands, New Realities, New Perspectives (pp. 133-157). New York: Teachers College Press.

Hord, S. M., Rutherford, W. L., Huling-Austin, L., & Hall, G. E. (1987). Taking Charge of Change. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Huberman, A. M. & Miles, M. B. (1984). Innovation Up Close: How School Improvement Works. New York: Plenum.

Hurd, P. D. (1998). Scientific Literacy: New Minds for a Changing World. Science Education, 82, 407-416.

Joyce, B. (Ed). (1990). Changing School Culture Through Staff Development, 1990 Yearbook. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Krajcik, J. S., Blumenfeld, P. C., Marx, R. W., & Soloway, E. (1994). A Collaborative Model for Helping Middle Grade Science Teachers Learn Project-based Instruction. The Elementary School Journal, 94(5), 483-497.

Ladewski, B. J., Krajcik, J. S., & Harvey, C. L. (1994). A Middle Grade Science Teacher’s Emerging Understanding of Project-based Instruction. The Elementary School Journal, 94(5), 499-515.

Layman, J. W., Ochoa, G., & Heikkinen, H. (1996). Inquiry and Learning: Realizing Science Standards in the Classroom. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

Lieberman, A., & Miller, L. (Eds). (1991). Staff Development for Education in the ’90s: New Demands, New Realities, New Perspectives (2nd ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

Linn, M. C., Clement, C., Pulos, S., & Sullivan, P. (1989). Scientific Reasoning in Adolescence: The Influence of Instruction in Science Knowledge and Reasoning Strategies. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26(2), 171-187.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

Little, J. W. (1993). Teachers’ Professional Development in a Climate of Educational Reform. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 15, 129-151.

Lloyd, C. V. (1988). The Relationship Between Scientific Literacy and High School Biology Textbooks. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Reading Conference, Austin, TX.

Lott, G. W. (1983). The Effect of Inquiry Teaching and Advance Organizers upon Student Outcomes in Science Education. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(5), 437-451.

Loucks-Horsley, S., Hewson, P. W., Love, N., & Stiles, K. E. (1998). Designing Professional Development for Teachers of Science and Mathematics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Malley, M. (1992). The Nature and History of Science. Chapter V in Teaching About the History and Nature of Science and Technology: Background Papers (pp. 67-80). Colorado Springs: Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS).

Marx, R. W., Blumenfeld, P. C., Krajcik, J. S., Blunk, M., Crawford, B. Kelley, B., & Meyer, K. M. (1994). Enacting Project-Based Science: Experiences of Four Middle Grade Teachers. The Elementary School Journal, 94(5), 517-538.

Mayer, W. (1978). Biology Teacher’s Handbook (3rd ed.). Colorado Springs: Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS).

McDermott, L. C., & the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. (1996). Physics by Inquiry (Volumes I & II). New York: John Wiley.

McDermott, L. C., & Redish, E. F. (1999). Resource Letter: PER-1: Physics Education Research. American Journal of Physics 67(10), 755-767.

Mechling, K. R., & Oliver, D. L. (1983). Promoting Science Among Elementary School Principals. Washington, DC: National Science Teachers Association.

Millar, R., & Driver, R. (1987). Beyond Process. Studies in Science Education, 14, 33-62.

Miller, D. M., & Pine, G. J. (1990). Advancing Professional Inquiry for Educational Improvement Through Action Research. Journal of Staff Development, 11(3), 56-61.

Minstrell, J. (1982). Explaining the At-Rest Condition of an Object. The Physics Teacher, 20, 10.

Minstrell, J. (1989). Teaching Science for Understanding. In L. B. Resnick & L. E. Klopfer (Eds), Toward the Thinking Curriculum: Current Cognitive Research (pp. 129-149). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Minstrell, J. (1992). Facets of Students’ Knowledge and Relevant Instruction. In R. Duit, F. Goldberg, & H. Niedderer (Eds), Proceedings of the International Workshop on Research in Physics Education: Theoretical Issues and Empirical Studies (pp. 110-128). Kiel, Germany: Instituit fur die Padagogik de Naturiwissenshaften.

Narode, R. (1987). Teaching Thinking Skills. NEA Professional Library. Washington, DC: National Education Association.

National Commission for Teaching & America’s Future. (1996). What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future. New York: Author.

National Research Council. (1990). Fulfilling the Promise: Biology Education in the Nation’s Schools. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (1996). The National Science Education Standards. Washington DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (1997). Science Teaching Reconsidered. A Handbook. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (1999a). Designing Mathematics and Science Curriculum Programs: A Guide for Using Mathematics and Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

National Research Council. (1999b). Selecting Instructional Materials: A Guide for K-12 Science. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Neill, D. M., & Medina, N. J. (1989). Standardized Testing: Harmful to Educational Health. Phi Delta Kappan 70(9), 688-697.

Nelson, A. R., Atwater, B. F., Bobrowsky, P. T., Bradley, L. A., Clague, J. J., Carver, G. A., Darienzo, M. E., Grant, W. C., Krueger, H. W., Sparks, R., Stafford, T. W., & Stuiver,

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

M. (1995). Radiocarbon Evidence for Extensive Plate-boundary Rupture about 300 Years Ago at the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Nature, 378, 371-374.

New Standards Project. (1997). New Standards Performance Standards. Washington, DC: National Center on Education and the Economy.

Novak, J. D. (1987). Proceedings of the Second International Seminar: Misconceptions and Educational Strategies in Science and Mathematics (Volumes I-III) . Ithaca, NY: Cornell University.

O’Day, J., & Smith, M. (1993). Systemic Reform and Educational Opportunity. In S. H. Fuhrman (Ed), Designing Coherent Education Policy: Improving the System (pp. 312-322). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Piaget, J. (1975). The Development of Thought. New York: Viking Press.

Piaget, J., & Inhelder, B. (1969). The Psychology of the Child. New York: Basic Books.

Prather, J. P. (1996). The Role of the School Principal in Science Education Reform. In J. Rhoton & P. Bowers (Eds), Issues in Science Education. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association and National Science Education Leadership Association.

Project Kaleidoscope. (1991). What Works: Building National Science Communities, Strengthening Undergraduate Science and Mathematics. Washington, DC: Author.

Raizen, S. A., & Kaser, J. S. (1989). Assessing Science Learning in Elementary School: Why, What, and How? Phi Delta Kappan, 70(9), 718-722.

Resnick, L. B., Bill, V. L., Lesgold, S. B., & Leer, M. N. (1991). Thinking in Arithmetic Class. In B. Means, C. Chelemer, & M. S. Knapp (Eds), Teaching Advanced Skills to At Risk Students (pp. 27-53). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Roberts, L., Wilson, M., & Draney, K. (1997). The SEPUP Assessment System: An Overview. Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center.

Rosebery, A. S., Warren, B., & Conant, F. R. (1992). Appropriating Scientific Discourse: Findings from Language Minority Classrooms. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 2(1), 61-94.

Rowe, M. B. (1991). Implications of the New Science Curricula. In S. M. Malcom & G. Kulum (Eds), Science Assessment in the Service of Reform. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science (now published by Lawrence Erlbaum).

Rowe, M. B. (1974). Wait Time and Rewards as Instructional Variables, Their Influence on Language, Logic, and Fate Control: Part One - Wait Time. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 11, 81-94.

Satake, K., Shimazaki, K., Tsuji, Y., & Ueda, K. (1996). Time and Size of a Giant Earthquake in Cascadia Inferred from Japanese Tsunami Record of January 1700. Nature, 379, 246-249.

Schmidt, W. H., McKnight, C. C., & Raizen, S. A. (1997). Splintered Vision: An Investigation of U.S. Science and Mathematics Education. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Schwab, J. (1960). What Do Scientists Do? Behavioral Science, 5(1).

Schwab, J. (1966). The Teaching of Science. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Scruggs, T. E., Mastropieri, M.A., Bakken, J. P., & Brigham, F. J. (1993). Reading Versus Doing: The Relative Effects of Textbook-based and Inquiry-oriented Approaches to Science Learning in Special Education Classrooms. The Journal of Special Education, 27(1), 1-15.

Secules, T., Cottom, C. D., Bray, M. H., Miller, L. D., & The Cognition and Technology Group at Vanderbilt. (1997). Schools for Thought: Creating Learning Communities. Educational Leadership, 54(6), 56-60.

Shulman, L. S. (1986). Those Who Understand: Knowledge Growth in Teaching. Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4-14.

Shymansky, J. A., Hedges, L. V., & Woodworth, G. (1990). A Reassessment of the Effects of Inquiry-based Science Curriculum of the ’60s on Student Performance. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 27, 127-144.

Shymansky, J. A., Kyle, W. C., & Alport, J. M. (1983). The Effects of New Science Curricula on Student Performance. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(5), 387-404.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

Songer, N. B., & Linn, M. C. (1991). How Do Students’ Views of Science Influence Knowledge Integration? Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 28(9), 761-784.

Stake, R. E., & Easley, J. A. (1978). Case Studies in Science Education. Urbana, IL: Center for Institutional Research and Curriculum Evaluation, University of Illinois.

Stigler, J. W., Gonzales, P., Kawanaka, T., Knoll, S., & Serrano, A. (1999). The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study. Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Wandersee, J. H., Mintzes, J. J., & Novak, J. D. (1994). Research on Alternative Conceptions in Science. In D. L. Gabel (Ed), Handbook of Research on Science Teaching and Learning (pp. 177-210). New York: Macmillan.

Weinstein, T., Boulanger, F. D., & Walberg, H. J. (1982). Science Curriculum Effects in High School: A Quantitative Synthesis. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 19(6), 511-522.

Weiss, I. R. (1978). Report of the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies Education. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Weiss, I. R. (1987). Report of the 1985-1986 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education. Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute.

White, B. Y., & Frederiksen, J. R. (1998). Inquiry, Modeling and Metacognition: Making Science Accessible to All Students. Cognition and Instruction, 16(1), 3-118.

White, B. Y., & Frederiksen, J. R. (In press). Metacognitive Facilitation: An Approach to Making Scientific Inquiry Accessible to All. In J. Minstrell & E. Van Zee (Eds), Teaching in the Inquiry-Based Science Classroom. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Wise, K. C., & Okey, J. R. (1983). A Meta-analysis of the Effects of Various Science Teaching Strategies on Achievement. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(5), 419-435.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 153
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 154
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 155
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 156
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 157
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 158
Next: Appendix A Excerpts from the National Science Education Standards »
Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $31.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Humans, especially children, are naturally curious. Yet, people often balk at the thought of learning science--the "eyes glazed over" syndrome. Teachers may find teaching science a major challenge in an era when science ranges from the hardly imaginable quark to the distant, blazing quasar.

Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards is the book that educators have been waiting for--a practical guide to teaching inquiry and teaching through inquiry, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. This will be an important resource for educators who must help school boards, parents, and teachers understand "why we can't teach the way we used to."

"Inquiry" refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and in which students grasp science knowledge and the methods by which that knowledge is produced. This book explains and illustrates how inquiry helps students learn science content, master how to do science, and understand the nature of science.

This book explores the dimensions of teaching and learning science as inquiry for K-12 students across a range of science topics. Detailed examples help clarify when teachers should use the inquiry-based approach and how much structure, guidance, and coaching they should provide.

The book dispels myths that may have discouraged educators from the inquiry-based approach and illuminates the subtle interplay between concepts, processes, and science as it is experienced in the classroom. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards shows how to bring the standards to life, with features such as classroom vignettes exploring different kinds of inquiries for elementary, middle, and high school and Frequently Asked Questions for teachers, responding to common concerns such as obtaining teaching supplies.

Turning to assessment, the committee discusses why assessment is important, looks at existing schemes and formats, and addresses how to involve students in assessing their own learning achievements. In addition, this book discusses administrative assistance, communication with parents, appropriate teacher evaluation, and other avenues to promoting and supporting this new teaching paradigm.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!