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Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
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Credits

Cover and page xix: Students at Glebe Elementary School, Arlington, VA, work on an activity from Organisms, a first-grade unit in the Science and Technology for Children (STC) curriculum program. Eric Long, photographer. Courtesy of the National Science Rsources Center (NSRC).

Page viii and page 6: Illustration by student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC.

Page viii and page 7: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page viii and page x: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page viii: Student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page viii and page 67: Students conducting an investigation of marine life. Courtesy of the Eisenhower Consortium @ SERVE.

Page viii and page 68: Students conducting an investigation of marine life. Courtesy of the Eisenhower Consortium @ SERVE.

Page ix and page 123: Students at Bailey’s Elementary School, Fairfax, VA, work on an activity from Animal Studies, a fourth-grade unit. Rick Vargas, photographer. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page ix and page 116: Student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page ix and page 133: Courtesy of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS).

Page ix and page 86: Courtesy of the Physics Education Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

Page ix and page 147: Courtesy of the Physics Education Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

Page ix and page 107: Teachers participating in an NSRC Leadership Institute. Rick Vargas, photographer. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page xi: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page xiv: Drawing by Van Nguyen, National Academy Press.

Page xx: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
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Page 2: Courtesy of Brian Atwater and Mary Lou Zoback, U.S. Geological Survey.

Page 4: Image of article reprinted by permission from Nature 378:371-372. Copyright 1995 Macmillan Magazines Ltd.

Page 9: Letter written by student, Janney Elementary School, Washington, DC.

Page 12: Student and teacher at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 15: Probably Tuskegee Institute. From the Library of Congress Photo Collections.

Page 16: From the Library of Congress Photo Collections.

Page 17: From the Library of Congress Photo Collections.

Page 24: Courtesy of Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley.

Page 28: Students working on an activity from Floating and Sinking, a fifth-grade STC unit. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 30: Courtesy of the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley.

Page 31: Student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 32: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 38: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 38: Student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 38: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 40: Courtesy of BSCS.

Page 42: Courtesy of BSCS.

Page 43: Student at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 45: Students at Glebe Elementary School, Arlington, VA, work on an activity from Organisms, a first-grade STC unit. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 49: Illustration by National Academy Press.

Page 51: Courtesy of BSCS.

Page 52: Students at Chevy Chase Elementary School, Chevy Chase, MD. David Savage, photographer. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 53: Moon phase photos courtesy of BSCS.

Page 55: Student at Eastern Middle School, Silver Spring, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 56: Image of the Copernican model of the universe. Reproduced from the Collections of the Library of Congress.

Page 57: Page from Galileo’s “Starry Messenger.” Reproduced from the Collections of the Library of Congress.

Page 62: Sketch drawn by student at Woodrow Wilson Senior High School, Washington, DC.

Page 73: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 74: Worksheet from students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC.

Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×

Page 77: Students at Glebe Elementary School, Arlington, VA, working on an activity from Organisms, a first-grade STC unit. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 81: Courtesy of BSCS.

Page 88: BASEE workshop, summer 1999. Courtesy of Mary Lou Zoback, U.S. Geological Survey.

Page 89: Students observing a Rube Goldberg device. Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.

Page 92: Students and teacher at Piney Branch Elementary School, Takoma Park, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 94: Teachers participating in an NSRC Leadership Institute. Rick Vargas, photographer. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 97: Teachers at Bellevue School District, Bellevue, WA, participating in a Physics by Inquiry class conducted by the Physics Education Group. Courtesy of the Physics Education Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

Page 100: Courtesy of the Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA.

Page 102: Courtesy of the Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA. Page 104: Courtesy of BSCS.

Page 110: Students and teacher at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 111: BAESI field trip. Courtesy of Mary Lou Zoback, U.S. Geological Survey.

Page 113: Principal and teacher at East Silver Spring Elementary School, Silver Spring, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 114: Students at Eastern Middle School, Silver Spring, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 118: Students at Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC. Danyelle Miller-Coe, photographer.

Page 121: Student at Montgomery Blair High School, Silver Spring, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 125: Student at Amidon Elementary School, Washington, DC, working on an activity from Floating and Sinking, a fifth-grade STC unit. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 130: Student at Piney Branch Elementary School, Takoma Park, MD. Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

Page 134: Students at Amidon Elementary School, Washington, DC, working on an activity from Floating and Sinking, a fifth-grade STC unit. Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 136: Courtesy of Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley.

Page 138: Courtesy of the NSRC.

Page 142: Courtesy of the Physics Education Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

Page 148: High school science supply shelves. Lisa Vandemark, photographer.

Page 151: Photodisk image.

Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
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Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9596.
×
Page 202
Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards: A Guide for Teaching and Learning Get This Book
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Humans, especially children, are naturally curious. Yet, people often balk at the thought of learning science--the "eyes glazed over" syndrome. Teachers may find teaching science a major challenge in an era when science ranges from the hardly imaginable quark to the distant, blazing quasar.

Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards is the book that educators have been waiting for--a practical guide to teaching inquiry and teaching through inquiry, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. This will be an important resource for educators who must help school boards, parents, and teachers understand "why we can't teach the way we used to."

"Inquiry" refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and in which students grasp science knowledge and the methods by which that knowledge is produced. This book explains and illustrates how inquiry helps students learn science content, master how to do science, and understand the nature of science.

This book explores the dimensions of teaching and learning science as inquiry for K-12 students across a range of science topics. Detailed examples help clarify when teachers should use the inquiry-based approach and how much structure, guidance, and coaching they should provide.

The book dispels myths that may have discouraged educators from the inquiry-based approach and illuminates the subtle interplay between concepts, processes, and science as it is experienced in the classroom. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards shows how to bring the standards to life, with features such as classroom vignettes exploring different kinds of inquiries for elementary, middle, and high school and Frequently Asked Questions for teachers, responding to common concerns such as obtaining teaching supplies.

Turning to assessment, the committee discusses why assessment is important, looks at existing schemes and formats, and addresses how to involve students in assessing their own learning achievements. In addition, this book discusses administrative assistance, communication with parents, appropriate teacher evaluation, and other avenues to promoting and supporting this new teaching paradigm.

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