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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
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Appendix C

Agenda

13-16 October 2013
Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts

SUNDAY, 13 OCTOBER

17:30 Registration

18:00–19:30

Welcome Reception (Palace Hotel)

Welcome from sponsoring organizations

  • Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts—
    • Zvonko Kusić, FCA, President
    • Dragan Dekaris, FCA, member, Department of Medical Sciences
  • U. K. Royal Society and International Union of Microbiological Societies—Elinor Buxton for Geoffrey Smith
  • U.S. National Academy of Sciences—John Clements

MONDAY, 14 OCTOBER

8:15

Registration, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
**All plenary sessions at Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
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9:00

Opening Plenary
Chair: John Clements

Welcome/Meeting Goals: John Clements
Introduction: “The Emerging Field of Microbial Forensics”:
Randall Murch

  • Why is there a need for microbial forensics and why is it important? What is the current state of the art and today’s cutting-edge techniques and infrastructure? How do the forensics used for criminal investigations differ from epidemiological investigations for public health?
  • What are the major research challenges for the field? How can basic science be used to solve the current challenges for microbial forensics and how might this help in other areas, such as public health?

Comments:

  • Piers Millet
  • Mats Forsman

Q&A

10:30

Break

11:00

Plenary: Microbial Ecology and Diversity—Microbial Forensics in the Context of Population Genetics
Chair: Paul Keim

  • What is known, in general, about the ecology of pathogens globally—Ruifu Yang
  • Microbial ecology and diversity in the context of microbial forensics—Aaron Darling

Q&A

12:00

Lunch (Palace Hotel)

Lunch Speaker
Chair: Geoffrey Smith
Talk: “Croatian Accomplishments in Forensics Genetics”—Dragan Primorac

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×

13:30

Plenary: Clinical and Forensic Approaches to Microbial Identification
Chair: Dragan Primorac

  • Technologies and techniques for forensics—Dana Kadavy
  • Clinical diagnostic practices—Alemka Markotić

Q&A

14:45

Plenary: Technologies and Approaches for Identifying Microbes for Law Enforcement—The 2001 Anthrax Letters
After a talk about the anthrax letters case, a panel of experts will make short comments to amplify specific aspects or perspectives, offer lessons from other cases.
Chair: Gilles Vergnaud
Speaker: Paul Keim
Comments:

  • Anthrax-contaminated heroin in Scotland and Germany—Richard Vipond
  • Hepatitis C case in Spain—Fernando González-Candelas
  • An international perspective: Inspections for biological weapons capabilities—Rocco Casagrande
  • An international perspective: UN Security Council Resolution 1540—Dana Perkins

Q&A

16:15

Poster Session and Reception, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
This session is intended to allow participants to discuss their research in an informal setting.

  • Welcome from Pavao Rudan, FCA, Secretary General of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×

TUESDAY, 15 OCTOBER

9:00 Plenary: Technologies and Approaches for Identifying Microbes in Public Health—The E. coli O104 Case
After a talk about the E. coli O104 case, a panel of experts will make short comments to offer lessons from other cases and amplify specific aspects or other perspectives.
Chair: Munirul Alam
Speaker: Dag Harmsen
Comments:
  • Haruo Watanabe
  • Stephen Morse
  • Raymond Lin

Q&A

10:30

Break

11:00

Plenary: Sampling and Preservation Methods
A talk will address key issues, such as public health versus criminal investigation, transportation and storage, accepted protocols and practices, and the more general question of whether there is a need for standardized methods that are shared internationally. A panel of experts will make comments at points during the talk.
Chair: Bruce Budowle
Speaker: Adam Hamilton
Comments:

  • Stephen Morse
  • Cerys Rees

Q&A

12:15

Lunch (Palace Hotel)

Lunch Speaker
Chair: Herawati Sudoyo
Talk: “The Importance of Reference Collections and the Role of the World Data Center for Microorganisms”—Juncai Ma

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×

13:45

Plenary: Validation and Reference Materials for Microbial Forensics
A talk will address key issues, such as guidelines and components for validation, transportation and storage, test materials, and whether there is a need for internationally accepted standards for validation.
Chair: Cindi Corbett
Speaker: Bruce Budowle

Q&A

14:45

Plenary: Bioinformatics and Data
Chair: Habib Bukhari

  • Role and importance of bioinformatics and computational genomics in microbial forensics—Jongsik Chun
  • Managing large datasets—Aaron Darling

Q&A

16:00

Break

16:30

Breakout sessions
These sessions will address questions intended to set the stage for the concluding sessions on the final day, such as:

  • If resources were not an issue, in what kinds of science should we invest?
  • Given that there are resource constraints, what critical investments should receive immediate priority?

17:30

Adjourn

17:35

Visit to the Strossmayer Gallery of Old Masters of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts

19:30

Conference Dinner

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×

WEDNESDAY, 16 OCTOBER

9:00 Plenary: Reporting Back from the Breakout Sessions
Brief summaries of key points from the previous day
Chair: John Clements

Q&A

9:45

Breakout Sessions
These sessions will refine and develop further the ideas that emerged from the first breakout sessions and initial plenary discussion.

10:45

Break

11:15

Concluding Plenary
Chair: John Clements
Brief summaries of key points from the morning sessions General discussion
Consideration of other issues, such as

  • Starting the dialogue toward development of international standards
  • Creating opportunities for education and training
  • Assessing viability of an international body (e.g., UN Secretary General’s Investigation Mechanism) to provide first response and investigative assistance

12:30

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 208
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18737.
×
Page 210
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Microbial forensics is a scientific discipline dedicated to analyzing evidence from a bioterrorism act, biocrime, or inadvertent microorganism or toxin release for attribution purposes. This emerging discipline seeks to offer investigators the tools and techniques to support efforts to identify the source of a biological threat agent and attribute a biothreat act to a particular person or group. Microbial forensics is still in the early stages of development and faces substantial scientific challenges to continue to build capacity.

The unlawful use of biological agents poses substantial dangers to individuals, public health, the environment, the economies of nations, and global peace. It also is likely that scientific, political, and media-based controversy will surround any investigation of the alleged use of a biological agent, and can be expected to affect significantly the role that scientific information or evidence can play. For these reasons, building awareness of and capacity in microbial forensics can assist in our understanding of what may have occurred during a biothreat event, and international collaborations that engage the broader scientific and policy-making communities are likely to strengthen our microbial forensics capabilities. One goal would be to create a shared technical understanding of the possibilities - and limitations - of the scientific bases for microbial forensics analysis.

Science Needs for Microbial Forensics: Developing Initial International Research Priorities, based partly on a workshop held in Zabgreb, Croatia in 2013, identifies scientific needs that must be addressed to improve the capabilities of microbial forensics to investigate infectious disease outbreaks and provide evidence of sufficient quality to support legal proceedings and the development of government policies. This report discusses issues of sampling, validation, data sharing, reference collection, research priorities, global disease monitoring, and training and education to promote international collaboration and further advance the field.

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