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Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff (2016)

Chapter: Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
Page 8
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
Page 9
Page 10
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
Page 10
Page 11
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1: Using the Instructor Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23411.
×
Page 11

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1 CHAPTER 1: USING THE INSTRUCTOR GUIDE This guide is designed to assist instructors in the delivery of the new training course, “Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff.” It includes lesson plans, guidance on classroom set-up, complete slide shows with scripts or instructor prompts, instructions for creating the ICS Quick Start Card set and Supervisor’s Folder, and some information about training for adults. If the trainer is experienced in the use of ICS in a field environment the preparation time should be approximately 24 hours to become familiar with the unique transportation-oriented material in this course and ancillary training sets, and to customize it for delivery in the specific state and jurisdiction where the course will be taught. All instructors for this course should have completed classes on delivering training to adults, have certificates in at least ICS 100, 200 and 300, and have some experience with ICS, at the field level or in an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). It is highly desirable for the instructor to also have experience working with a transportation agency in emergency planning or training, or as a field supervisor, and to have also completed ICS 400 and E/L449 ICS “Incident Command System Curricula TTT” courses. The National Incident Management System (NIMS) requires the use of ICS at all emergency events. “This system will provide a consistent nationwide approach for Federal, State, and local governments to work effectively and efficiently together to prepare for, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. “ (HSPD-5, 2003, (15) ) US DOT/FHWA MUTCD states, “NIMS requires the use of ICS at traffic management scenes.” (2009, p. 726). This “ICS… for Transportation” course was developed as a baseline for all fifty states. Each instructor will need to customize the slide show to ensure that the emergency scenarios and examples used are appropriate to the conditions in the state where it is being taught. The instructor must be knowledgeable about state legal requirements for the use of ICS, and agency policy on safety and reimbursement issues. This information must be customized to the state where the training is being delivered. PREFACE The purpose of “ICS…for Transportation” is to ensure that all transportation field personnel operate safely in an emergency or traffic management event by being appropriately integrated into ICS in the field. This course assumes that all field-level transportation personnel have taken the ICS 100 course, either on line, or in a classroom, or have used the US DOT FHWA NIMS Workbook (FHWA, 2009) to complete the FEMA-accredited ICS training requirement. This course is intended to review the basic ICS structures and terminologies that ensure safety, personnel accountability and support for the agency’s financial reimbursement efforts. It teaches five possible roles for field-level transportation personnel at an event or traffic incident: joining an existing incident command as an operational asset; joining an existing incident command as a technical specialist; assuming Incident Command from another entity when all life safety issues have been addressed but transportation facility issues remain; participating in a unified command; or starting an incident command as initial Incident Commander. Its focus is solely on how transportation agency personnel and assets are part of the Incident Command System. This instructor guide contains the materials needed to deliver the basic “ICS … for Transportation” course, as well as some “tailgate” training refresher course materials, and a set of discussion based refresher course materials. The initial course may be offered as a stand-alone course in about four hours. The refresher courses are designed to be offered as training sessions within a daily briefing period, or as adjuncts to the basic course in a day-long hour format. Therefore the materials are offered as three sets of instructional materials (basic course, briefing and discussion-based), and the instructor may integrate these materials as appropriate for the time and audience.

2 Because the audience for this course is field-level supervisors and workers, it is recommended that the students be given the student notebooks as hardcopy so they can easily share the information with their families and keep the guidance materials in their work kits or vehicles. However, all student manual materials are provided in their native formats on the TRB website (http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/173984.aspx) so that agencies may disseminate the information in whatever format is appropriate for their staff members. Note that the ancillary materials on the website are generic and intended to meet the basic needs of transportation agencies in all fifty states. Instructors should carefully review all the work, home and personal preparedness fliers to ensure that they are appropriate for the state and jurisdiction where the training is being offered. The issue of disaster service worker should be reviewed with the agency’s human resources professionals, and an appropriate agency-specific flier should be substituted. The state’s Office of Emergency Services may have different or additional work, home and personal preparedness fliers that address jurisdiction-specific hazards and risk analysis. These may be substituted or added to the employee education materials to enhance the benefit of sharing that information. The ICS Quick Start Cards master file is also intended to be carefully reviewed by the instructors and customized to meet agency-specific regulations and legal concerns as necessary. The cards are offered as an MSWord documents to facilitate the updating, augmentation and revision of the basic information to ensure that the guidance meets all state and agency mandates. The Supervisor’s Folder is designed to facilitate the use and updating of the ICS forms required for managing an event in the field. The instructors should determine which ICS forms are currently used by the agency and augment the number of pockets to include any additional state-specific form selections. The ICS 201, 208 and 214 represent the basic set of forms that should be used in all states to comply with ICS requirements to address the complexity of the response (safety) and diversity of responding entities (communications plan). The goal of the “ICS…for Transportation” basic course is training transportation field-level personnel to • understand the role of transportation in emergencies; • understand ICS roles and terminology; • understand the use of ICS for safety, personnel accountability and financial reimbursement; • understand the application of ICS to an emergency or traffic incident involving transportation personnel and assets. Field-level transportation personnel will leave the course understanding that they are an integral part of the emergency response organization, and that they should be specifically included in all ICS plans and implementation. The instructor guide and supporting materials will enable the instructors to thoroughly prepare to deliver the course and achieve its goals.

3 MATERIALS, AUDIO VISUAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS Audio Visual Needs: • MSPowerPoint presentation • Laptop computer with appropriate power connection • Projector on cart or table with appropriate power connection, and cable for laptop • Screen • Three 6’ or longer tables • Microphone (optional) Props: • Sets of 1:64 vehicles (Matchbox, Hot Wheels or similar), including police (2-6), fire (2-6), EMS (2-4), heavy equipment (4-8), media truck (2) and personal (20) vehicles, road cones, road signage and 2 tanker trucks • Civil Engineer’s tape • Completed Supervisor’s Folder • 10 sets of ICS Quick Start Cards Handout Materials per Pupil: • Student Manuals as appropriate for lessons to be covered: ICS, Briefing Training, Discussion- Based Scenarios • Course Evaluation sheets for each element taught – Modules 1a, 1b and 2 on one sheet • ICS Field Operations Guide (FOG), 420 (FEMA version may be downloaded and printed at about $30 per book; FIRESCOPE ICS FOG 420 can be purchased on-line for $5 per book plus shipping) Seating Arrangement: • Students in classroom style set up in any configuration that allows a clear view of the screen from every seat and adequate width to open the student manuals, and a view of one of the “accident” set up tables • Instructors in front of the classroom where they can be easily heard by the students, and control the slide show Table Set Up: • One table at the front of the classroom to accommodate the instructor, laptop and instructor’s written materials • Tables and chairs for students with one student manual and one FOG manual per student on the tables, and one set of ICS Quick Start Cards for each table up to 10 tables. If there are additional tables place one set of cards for every 2 tables. • Two tables set up as an accident scene. Use these instructions to create 2 different set ups on 2 tables, one on each side of the front of the room. Using Civil Engineer’s tape create a “highway.” Place the tanker truck on its side obstructing the highway, and about 10 personal vehicles in rear end collisions, “spinouts” and other accident-type positions. Place the heavy equipment in a reasonable configuration for highway work just ahead of the accident scene. Place the police, fire, ems and media vehicles and the cones and signs at the end of the road. These will be introduced into the accident scene as the scenario using ICS unfolds.

4 WORKSHOP SCHEDULING OPTIONS Option One, 4 hours: 3 hours of instruction, 1 hour of introductory material, break, wrap-up Welcome, Safety Message and Introductions: Instructors and Participants 15 mins. Review of the Student Manual 15 mins. Module 1a: ICS for Field Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff 60 mins. Break 15 mins. Module 1b: ICS in the Field: Five Roles of Transportation (ICS Quick Start Cards and Supervisor’s Folder introduction) 45 mins. Module 2: Working the Accident: You Start/You Join Selected Scenario 45 mins. Questions/Discussion 30 mins. Wrap-up and Course Evaluation for Modules 1a, 1b and 2 15 mins. Option Two, 7 hours: Add Afternoon Session Below Briefing Training Topic: Safety 15 mins. Briefing Training Topic: Communications 15 mins. Briefing Training Topic: Collaboration with Other Professions 15 mins. Selected Scenario 30 mins. Break 15 mins. Selected Scenario 30 mins. Selected Scenario 30 mins. Questions/ Discussion 15 mins. Wrap-up and Course Evaluation 15 mins. Alternative Delivery Schedules Note that the Briefing Training and Discussion-Based Training segments were designed as free standing instructional blocks within a morning briefing or other training environment. These can be used in any order, for example, the Briefing Training Topic: Safety module could be taught, followed by a Scenario, where safety can again be emphasized as the students work the wildland fire problem. For a shorter training day just one of the Briefing Training modules and one of the discussion-based Scenario modules could be added to the morning session. In that case more time might be allotted for discussion of the accident in the morning, and the evaluation activity for the morning and afternoon modules could be moved to the afternoon. Another possible configuration is to divide the students into 2 or 4 groups and have each work a different problem at the same time from the Discussion-Based Training segments, with an instructor or senior transportation emergency management staff member as the facilitator for each group. The groups could then report back to each other on the Incident Action Plan they created for the event they were managing using the ICS Quick Start Cards and FOG.

5 Free Standing Training Each of the Briefing Training and Discussion-Based Training segments can also be offered as a separate instructional block at another time. The Briefing Training segments were designed to be incorporated into the morning briefing as a thought-based refresher course for staff members who have completed the basic ICS course. These could be offered at quarterly meetings or as the ICS portion of training update events, as well. The Discussion-Based Training segments were designed to be used as quick discussion-based refresher courses on all aspects of ICS. Using the little vehicles to work through the problem would quickly review all aspects of ICS activities within a locally-meaningful scenario. In any case the purpose of Briefing Training and Discussion-Base Training segments is to reinforce and refresh the training provided in the morning. SANDBOX METHOD OF EXERCISES Note the engineer’s tape creating the “highway”, the simulated accident with the little cars, the emergency vehicles in Staging, the student book with the slides on the different ICS elements, and the Supervisor’s Card sets that are distributed to students to help them work through the scenario. The purpose of the Sandbox Method is to help students visualize the movement of personnel and equipment through a scenario as they practice their Incident Command System knowledge and terminology. This system has long been used by the US military to work an operational problem or to explain an operational plan. Field personnel are accustomed to thinking on their feet, and are likely to appreciate a kinesthetic approach to exercising their critical thinking skills and knowledge of a problem. Adult learning theory suggests that most adults remember best what they hear, see and do. The Sandbox Method incorporates these elements.

6 Matchbox-type cars can be bought in sets from internet resources that include construction equipment, cones and signage. Emergency responder vehicles and passenger cars also come in sets. On the internet these sets are generally less than $20 for thirty or more small vehicles. You can use little buildings to complete the community, but these can be expensive. For a more flexible and cost-effective approach, create a building foot print with a sheet of plain cardstock cut to relative scale to represent significant buildings, parking lots, parks and other aspects of the community. Label the cards, or draw symbols on them to identify the building or community element that the card represents. As students work through the scenario, they can move the vehicles and traffic control devices and block roads to simulate the progress of the problem. As you demonstrate scenarios you will develop a collection of community element footprint cards that can be reused. The vehicles can be used for training in many configurations.

Next: Chapter 2 Course Development and Pilot Programs »
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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 215: Incident Command System (ICS) Training for Field-Level Supervisors and Staff provides training materials and guidance for transportation field personnel to help their organizations operate safely in an emergency or traffic management event. This course is intended to review the basic ICS structures and terminologies aimed to ensure safety, personnel accountability, and support for the agency’s financial reimbursement efforts.

This product includes lesson plans, guidance on classroom set-up, complete slide shows with scripts or instructor prompts, instructions for creating materials, and some information about training for adults. Specifically, the materials include:

1. A video presentation with voice-over of the MSPowerPoint slides for the ICS for Field-Level Transportation Supervisors and Staff training course (Format: ISO of an MP4 file)

2. An Instructor Guide and Student Course Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, PDF files).

3. An Instructor Guide and Student Evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint files)

4. Discussion-Based Training Scenarios, which contain an instructor's guide and student evaluation (Customizable; Format: ZIP file of Microsoft Word files)

5. ICS Quick Start Cards (Customizable; Format: Microsoft Word)

6. A Supervisor’s Folder, which includes a materials list and construction information (Format: Microsoft Word).

The course material provided in this project assumes that instructors have completed classes on delivering training to adults, have certificates in at least ICS 100, 200 and 300, and have some experience with ICS, at the field level or in an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). It is also assumed that instructors may have had experience working with a transportation agency in emergency planning or training, or as a field supervisor, and to have also completed ICS 400 and E/L449 ICS “Incident Command System Curricula TTT” courses.

Disclaimer: This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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