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Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Public Workshop Agenda and Comments

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agenda and Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
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Appendix B

Public Workshop Agenda and Comments

January 10, 2017
National Academy of Sciences Building—Lecture Room
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20418

8:30 Welcome and Introductory Remarks
Rob Russell, Chair
8:35 Lessons from the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC)
  • Barbara Millen, former chair, 2015 DGAC
9:20 Systematic Reviews in Nutrition
  • Stephanie Chang, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
  • Eve Essery Stoody, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Julie Obbagy, USDA
10:40 Developing and Planning for Systematic Reviews
  • Shawna Mercer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Holger Schünemann, McMaster University (remote)
  • David Meltzer, University of Chicago (remote)
1:15 The Role of Nutrition and Diet in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease
  • Bert Garza, Boston College and Johns Hopkins University
1:45 Other Data Inputs into the DGA
  • Patricia Britten, former USDA
  • Patricia Mabry, Indiana University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agenda and Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
3:00 Dissemination and Implementation of the DGA
  • Kathleen Rasmussen, Cornell University
  • Janet de Jesus, National Institutes of Health
  • Becky Domokos-Bays, Supervisor of School Nutrition, Loudoun County

At the workshop, the committee asked for a public response to two questions:

  • What are the two major challenges you face in implementing the DGA?
  • What are the two biggest opportunities you see for the DGA to promote chronic disease prevention and ensure nutritional sufficiency?

Responses from the public were made in person during the workshop and received online from the following individuals and groups:

Angela Amico, Center for Science in the Public Interest, on behalf of Lorrene Ritchie, University of California Nutrition Policy Institute

Tejas Bhatt, Institute of Food Technologists

Darlena Birch, National Women, Infants, and Children Association

Cara Brumfield, 1,000 Days

Robert Burns, Grocery Manufacturers Association

Jeannette Crenshaw, United States Breastfeeding Committee

Emma Gregory, American Frozen Food Institute

Colette Heimowitz, Atkins Nutritionals, Inc.

Guy Johnson, McCormick Science Institute

Casey Keller, Global Wrigley

Mark Kennedy, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Clara Lau, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

Susan Levin, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Sean Lucan, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Richard Lucas, Food and Nutrition Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Jim O’Hara, Center for Science in the Public Interest

Sarah Ohlhorst, American Society for Nutrition

Mary Pat Raimondi, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Tia Rains, Egg Nutrition Center

Pauline Sakamoto, Human Milk Banking Association of North America

Lee Sanders, American Bakers Association

Kristen Strader, Public Citizen

Paula Trumbo, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Joan Younger, American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding

Tracey Ziener, Wrigley

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agenda and Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 215
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agenda and Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 216
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What foods should Americans eat to promote their health, and in what amounts? What is the scientific evidence that supports specific recommendations for dietary intake to reduce the risk of multifactorial chronic disease? These questions are critically important because dietary intake has been recognized to have a role as a key determinant of health.

As the primary federal source of consistent, evidence-based information on dietary practices for optimal nutrition, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) have the promise to empower Americans to make informed decisions about what and how much they eat to improve health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. The adoption and widespread translation of the DGA requires that they be universally viewed as valid, evidence-based, and free of bias and conflicts of interest to the extent possible. However, this has not routinely been the case.

A first short report meant to inform the 2020 review cycle explored how the advisory committee selection process can be improved to provide more transparency, eliminate bias, and include committee members with a range of viewpoints. This second and final report recommends changes to the DGA process to reduce and manage sources of bias and conflicts of interest, improve timely opportunities for engagement by all interested parties, enhance transparency, and strengthen the science base of the process.

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