National Academies Press: OpenBook

Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2017)

Chapter: Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies

« Previous: Appendix E: Additional Information About the Dietary Reference Intakes
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

Appendix F

Committee Member and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Robert M. Russell, M.D. (Chair), is professor emeritus of Medicine and Nutrition at Tufts University. Dr. Russell has served on many national and international advisory boards including the U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Investigation Committee (Chairman), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Pharmacopoeia Convention, National Institutes of Health (NIH), the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the American Board of Internal Medicine. He has worked on international nutrition programs in several countries including China, Guatemala, Haiti, Iran, Iraq, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Dr. Russell is a member of numerous professional societies, on the editorial boards of four professional journals, a past president of the American Society for Nutrition (ASN), and is now President of the ASN Foundation. Dr. Russell co-edited two editions of Present Knowledge in Nutrition and was the Editor in Chief of Nutrition Reviews. Dr. Russell served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences panels on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline, and as chair of the panel on Micronutrients. He is a National Associate of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies). He is former chair of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the National Academies, and is a fellow of ASN. Dr. Russell presently is working with the Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) Program of NIH and is on the board of Haiti Projects. He also has recently served as a board member of the Nestlé and Fetzer Foundations. He has received numerous national and international awards for his research on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

retinoids and carotenoids (Kritchevsky, Atwater, DSM awards), and has authored more than 300 scientific papers and 5 books. He received his M.D. from Columbia University.

Jamy Ard, M.D., is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Prevention and in the Department of Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. He is also co-director of the Wake Forest Baptist Health Weight Management Center, directing medical weight management programs. Dr. Ard received an M.D. and completed internal medicine residency training at Duke University Medical Center. He also received formal training in clinical research as a fellow at the Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Ard has more than 15 years of experience in clinical nutrition and obesity. Prior to joining the faculty at Wake Forest in 2012, Dr. Ard spent 9 years at The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) where he served as medical director of UAB’s EatRight Weight Management Services, vice chair for clinical care in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, and associate dean for clinical affairs in the School of Health Professions. Dr. Ard’s research interests include clinical management of obesity and strategies to improve cardiometabolic risk using lifestyle modification. He has been conducting research on lifestyle modification since 1995 and has worked on several NIH-funded multicenter trials, including Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), DASH-sodium, and Weight Loss Maintenance Trial. His work has been published in numerous scientific journals, and he has been a featured presenter at several conferences and workshops dealing with obesity. Dr. Ard has served on several expert panels and guideline development committees, including the Institute of Medicine Committee on Consequences of Sodium Reduction in Populations, the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/The Obesity Society Guideline Panel on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults, and currently, the American Psychological Association Obesity Guideline Development Panel. He is also serving on the editorial board for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the International Journal of Obesity.

Stephanie A. Atkinson, Ph.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), is a professor and nutrition clinician–scientist, Department of Pediatrics, associate member, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, and professional staff in McMaster Children’s Hospital, Hamilton. A key focus of her research has been investigations of the factors influencing skeletal development in premature and term infants and in children with boney morbidity secondary to disease process and/or drug therapy (particularly steroids) in diseases

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

such as lymphoblastic leukemia, nephrosis, rheumatoid disorders, cystic fibrosis, or epilepsy. Her current research encompasses clinical trial and epidemiological investigations of the environmental (nutrition), genetic, and biochemical factors during fetal, neonatal, and early childhood life that play a role in defining the offspring phenotype and as risk determinants for noncommunicable diseases. She leads a multidisciplinary team of researchers in the conduct of randomized clinical intervention trials of nutrition and exercise in pregnancy designed to optimize maternal and child health outcomes including bone health. Dr. Atkinson served on the Scientific Oversight Committee for the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) from 1995 to 2004 and several DRI projects and workshops since that time. Most recently she has served as a working group member for the DRI and Chronic Diseases Endpoints project cosponsored by Health Canada and the Office of Dietary Supplements of NIH. Dr. Atkinson currently serves as chair of the Board of Directors of the Maternal, Infant, Child and Youth Health Research Network (MICYRN) and colead of the MICYRN Canadian Birth Cohort Coalition to harmonize data from Canadian birth cohort studies, as Executive Member of Board of Trustees of the North American International Life Sciences Institute (Washington, DC), and as a member of the Scientific Advisory Council for Osteoporosis Canada. Dr. Atkinson is an elected Fellow of both the American Society for Nutrition and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and was recently awarded a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from Western University in London, Canada.

Carol J. Boushey, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., is the director of the Nutrition Support Shared Resource at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center. Her research has involved working as part of multidisciplinary teams, which is crucial for providing support to the member investigators of the Cancer Center as they design and conduct studies that include the collection and analyses of dietary intake and other nutritional issues. She specializes in the broad spectrum of evaluating dietary exposures with an emphasis on use of technology and assessing diverse racial/ethnic groups. In collaboration with scientists in engineering at Purdue University, she created the Technology Assisted Dietary Assessment program that uses image analysis and visualization on small mobile devices (e.g., mobile telephones), to aid researchers in collecting dietary intake with limited burden. She has been fundamental in describing dietary intakes of several Pacific Northwest Tribal Nations and young children in jurisdictions in the Pacific. Dr. Boushey is actively involved with the dietary assessment methods used with the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), which includes 215,000 adults representing five ethnic groups (Japanese, Hawaiian, non-Hispanic white, African American, Hispanic/Latino). As a member of the Dietary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

Patterns Methods Project, she completed analyses in the MEC showing that consuming a dietary pattern that achieves a high diet-quality index score is associated with lower risk of mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in adult men and women. She has been the chief architect of paper- and computer-based dietary assessment methods to assess calcium consumption among Asian, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white adolescents in the United States. Dr. Boushey received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington and her M.P.H. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Susan M. Krebs-Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the chief of the Risk Factor Assessment Branch of the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) in the National Cancer Institute’s Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS). She oversees EGRP’s research portfolio and initiatives that focus on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, as well as the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population. Her own surveillance research has emphasized trends in intake of foods and nutrients, especially fruits and vegetables; food sources of nutrients; and factors associated with the intake of foods and/or nutrients, using data from the National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Program. Her contributions in the area of dietary assessment methodology have focused on developing methods to assess dietary patterns and the usual intake of foods. Her efforts in dietary guidance and food policy include quantifying potential future demand for food commodities based on population-wide adoption of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and census projections. Dr. Krebs-Smith provided data analyses and consultation in support of the last several editions of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee to Develop a Framework for Assessing the Effects of the Food System. Prior to joining EGRP, Dr. Krebs-Smith was the chief of the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch in the Applied Research Program (now the Health Care Delivery Research Program), DCCPS. She received her Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University and her M.P.H. from the University of Minnesota.

Joseph Lau, M.D., is professor emeritus in the Center for Evidence Synthesis in Health within the School of Public Health at Brown University and was the co-director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) designated Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) at Brown. Prior to Brown, he was a professor of medicine and professor of clinical and translational science at the Institute for Clinical Research and Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

Policy Studies at Tufts Medical Center. He directed the Tufts EPC from 1997 until 2012 and led the production of more than 80 evidence reports, technology assessments, and comparative effectiveness reviews under contract with the AHRQ. He has served as a member of an FDA advisory committee, and as a member of a Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization workshop. He served as a member on two Institute of Medicine committees including Framework to Evaluate the Safety of Dietary Supplements and Standards for Clinical Practice Guidelines. He received his M.D. from Tufts University School of Medicine and completed a fellowship in clinical decision making and medical computer science at the New England Medical Center.

Bruce Y. Lee, M.D., M.B.A., is an associate professor of international health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, executive director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC) at Johns Hopkins, and director of operations research at the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC) as well as associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Dr. Lee has more than 15 years of experience in industry and academia in systems science and developing and implementing mathematical and computational methods, models, and tools to assist decision making in public health and medicine. He has been the Principal Investigator for projects supported by a variety of organizations and agencies including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH, AHRQ, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF, the Global Fund, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. His previous positions include serving as Senior Manager at Quintiles Transnational, working in biotechnology equity research at Montgomery Securities, cofounding Integrigen, and serving as an associate professor at the University of Pittsburgh, where he founded PIHCOR (Public Health Computational and Operations Research), which is now based at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Lee has authored more than 180 scientific publications (including more than 90 first author and more than 35 last author) as well as 3 books: Principles and Practice of Clinical Trial Medicine, What If…?: Survival Guide for Physicians, and Medical Notes: Clinical Medicine Pocket Guide. He is an associate editor for the journal Vaccine and deputy editor for PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post and Forbes. He and his work have garnered attention in leading media outlets such as The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Time, CBS News, Businessweek, U.S. News & World Report, Bloomberg News, Reuters, and National Public Radio (NPR). Dr. Lee received his B.A. from Harvard University, his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and his M.B.A. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He completed his internal medicine residency training at the University of California, San Diego.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

Joanne R. Lupton, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor emerita at Texas A&M University, where she was a faculty member for 31 years prior to retiring in 2015. She chaired the Macronutrients Panel for the Dietary Reference Intakes that determined the intake values for protein, carbohydrates, fats, fiber, and energy for the United States and Canada and she also chaired the Institute of Medicine panel to determine the definition of dietary fiber. She was a member of the 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. She is currently serving a second term on FNB. Dr. Lupton spent 1 year at FDA helping to develop levels of scientific evidence required for health claims. While there she was appointed to the Commissioner’s Task Force for Better Nutrition and received a Commissioner’s Special Citation for her work. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2010 and is a lifetime associate of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Lupton has mentored more than 100 M.S. and Ph.D. students while at Texas A&M, and received the Dannon/American Society for Nutrition mentoring award in 2004. In 2007 she received the Texas A&M University distinguished achievement award for research. In 2010 she received the ASN General Mills Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition–Innovation Award. Dr. Lupton is Past President of ASN, the nutrition research organization. Her research is on the effect of diet on colon physiology and colon cancer with a particular focus on dietary fiber and n-3 fatty acids. She has received the Vahouny Medal for her research on dietary fiber. She translates basic research on diet and colon physiology to science-based public policy and has consulted with individuals in China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and elsewhere on the definition of dietary fiber and establishing dietary guidance systems in those countries. Her undergraduate degree is from Mt. Holyoke College, and her Ph.D. in nutrition is from the University of California, Davis.

Sally C. Morton, Ph.D., is the dean of the College of Science at Virginia Tech, and holds the Lay Nam Chang Dean’s Chair. Her research focuses on evidence synthesis and patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. Previously, Dr. Morton served as chair of the Department of Bio-statistics in the Graduate School of Public Health and director of the Comparative Effectiveness Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh, vice president for statistics and epidemiology at RTI International, and head of the RAND Corporation Statistics Group. Dr. Morton was president of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and chair of Section U (Statistics) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and she is a fellow of both organizations. She is a member of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Methodology Committee, and the AHRQ EPCs Program Methods Steering Committee. She has served on several National Academies committees, the Census Scientific Advisory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

Committee, and the National Academies Committee on National Statistics. Dr. Morton holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.

Nicolaas P. Pronk, Ph.D., is the president of the HealthPartners Institute and Chief Science Officer at HealthPartners and holds a faculty appointment as Adjunct Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Pronk’s work is focused on connecting evidence of effectiveness with the practical application of programs, practices, policies, and systems that measurably improve population health and well-being. His research interests include workplace health and safety, obesity, physical activity, and systems approaches to population health and well-being. Currently, Dr. Pronk serves as a co-chair of the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services’ Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030 (Healthy People 2030) and is a member of the Community Preventive Services Task Force. He was the founding and past president of the International Association for Worksite Health Promotion and has served on boards and committees at the National Academies; the American Heart Association; and the Health Enhancement Research Organization, among others. He is widely published in both the scientific and practice literatures with more than 400 articles, books, and book chapters and is an international speaker on population health and health promotion. Dr. Pronk received his doctorate degree in exercise physiology at Texas A&M University and completed his postdoctoral studies in behavioral medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Susan B. Roberts, Ph.D., is the director of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory, professor of nutrition and co-director of the Obesity Research Cluster in the Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and professor of psychiatry and scientific staff member in pediatrics in the Tufts University School of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, and did postdoctoral training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before moving to Tufts in 1987. Her research focuses on determinants of weight regulation, including dietary composition factors such as glycemic index, protein, and fiber, and behavioral factors in weight control. In addition to her work in the United States she has conducted studies in Brazil, China, The Gambia, Guinea Bissau, and the United Kingdom. She has published more than 240 research papers in research journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA, and has an H-index of 61. Dr. Roberts was the 2009 awardee of the E.V. McCollum award of the American Society for Nutrition to recognize the creativity and importance

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

of her work on weight regulation, and the 2016 W.O. Atwater Lecturer for important contributions to nutrition and health worldwide.

A. Catharine Ross, Ph.D., is a professor and the occupant of the Dorothy Foehr Huck Chair of Nutrition in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at The Pennsylvania State University. As a nutritional biochemist, Dr. Ross has studied cellular factors involved in the biosynthesis and transport of vitamin A molecules. Her focus has been on the interaction of cellular retinoid-binding proteins and enzymes that esterify retinol for transport, storage, and oxidation with the intent to link biochemical findings with nutritional studies to better understand how vitamin A homeostasis is regulated by dietary status and metabolic conditions. She also investigates the role of retinoids in immune function, principally antibody production. Dr. Ross has received numerous awards, including the Mead-Johnson Award and the Osborne and Mendel Award from the American Society for Nutrition. She is active within a range of professional societies, including the American Association of Immunologists, Sigma Xi, and the American Physiological Society, and has served on a number of committees for the American Society for Nutrition and the Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology. Dr. Ross is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She chaired the committee on Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium and served on the FNB panel on Micronutrients for the Dietary Reference Intakes, and the committee on Opportunities in the Nutrition of Food Sciences. Dr. Ross is also a member of FNB. Dr. Ross received her Ph.D. from Cornell University in biochemistry and molecular and cell biology.

Barbara O. Schneeman, Ph.D., served as the higher education coordinator for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). In this role, Dr. Schneeman worked with the higher education community to improve awareness of USAID opportunities and increase engagement avenues for the agency. Previously she served as the director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements at FDA from 2004 to 2013. In that position, she oversaw the development of policy and regulations for dietary supplements, labeling, food standards, infant formula, and medical foods, and she served as U.S. delegate to two Codex committees (Food Labeling and Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses). From 1976 to 2004, she was a member of the nutrition faculty at University of California, Davis, and is currently emeritus professor of nutrition. She has been a visiting scientist at University of California, San Francisco, and Assistant Administrator for Nutrition in the Agricultural Research Service of USDA. Professional activities include participation in Dietary Guide-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

lines Advisory Committees (1990 and 1995) and FNB of the National Academies, among others. She is recognized for her work on dietary fiber, gastrointestinal function, and policy development in the area of food and nutrition. She received her B.S. degree in food science from the University of California, Davis; her Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley; and her postdoctoral training in gastrointestinal physiology at Children’s Hospital in Oakland, California.

Martín J. Sepúlveda, M.D., FACP, FAAP, FACOEM, is an IBM Fellow and elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. He is recently retired from the IBM Corporation where he had a distinguished career, serving in numerous executive capacities including vice president of Health Systems and Policy Research and vice president of Integrated Health Services. He led health policy, strategy, health benefits, services and operations, occupational health, and well-being for IBM globally. He is widely recognized for contributions in public and population health, private-sector health care, wellness, and health benefits innovation. He led private-sector collaboration with clinicians for medical home transformation leading to formation of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. Dr. Sepúlveda received his M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Harvard University, his B.A. magna cum laude from Yale University, and he completed residencies in internal medicine at UCSF Hospitals, and occupational/environmental medicine at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. He trained in the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and completed a fellowship in internal medicine at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He serves on several boards including the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, The New York Academy of Medicine, and the Council for Health Research for Economic Development.

STAFF

Samantha M. Chao is a senior program officer at the National Academies. Previously she was a manager at The Pew Charitable Trusts where she developed and implemented a process to ensure the integrity and quality of research produced by teams across almost 30 policy areas. In that role, she advised teams on design and conduct of high-quality research methods at the national, state, and local levels. At Pew she also worked on the State Health Care Spending project to enumerate the cost of health care to states. Prior to joining Pew, she directed numerous studies at the National Academies, including the groundbreaking report Health IT and Patient Safety. She focused primarily on health care quality, performance measures, payment models, and methods to improve the quality and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

value of health care through the strengthening of research. She also conducted studies related to the U.S. Social Security Administration, integrative medicine, and continuing education for health professionals. She completed an M.P.H. in health policy with a concentration in management at the University of Michigan.

Meghan E. Quirk is a senior program officer on FNB. Dr. Quirk’s current projects include working with a committee to develop a workshop on federal, state, tribal, and local strategies to limit sugar-sweetened beverages among young children and assisting on a study to review the process for updating the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Dr. Quirk has also worked on the recently completed review of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food packages and directed a study on interpreting reports on obesity prevalence and trends. Prior to joining the National Academies, Dr. Quirk was a postdoctoral research associate at Tennessee State University where she gained experience in community-based participatory research. She was part of a collaborative team that developed a smartphone app designed to provide nutrition education information to families with a preschool-aged child enrolled in WIC. She earned her doctorate from Emory University, where her research focused on the clinical and dietary evaluation of patients prescribed a newly approved drug for the management of phenylketonuria. During her graduate training, she was also involved in efforts to develop nutritional management guidelines of five inborn errors of metabolism. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nutrition and dietetics from the University of New Mexico.

Anna Bury is a research associate at the National Academies. She is jointly supporting the consensus study that is reviewing the process to update the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the Food Forum, a longstanding initiative of the FNB. During her time at the National Academies, she has assisted with two additional consensus studies, Assessing Prevalence and Trends in Obesity: Navigating the Evidence, and Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. She received her bachelor’s degree in public health and sustainable development from Gordon College, where her research focused on the relationship between sustainable agricultural systems and community health, with case studies in Morocco, Switzerland, and the United States.

Meredith J. Young joined FNB as a Senior Program Assistant in September 2016. She is jointly supporting the consensus study that is reviewing the process to update the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and a workshop

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

titled Strategies to Limit Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in Young Children. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University as a health education office assistant and an undergraduate research assistant. She has experience supporting clinical research, specifically controlled feeding studies assessing the effects of prebiotic supplementation and cocoa supplementation in pre-diabetic adults, the effects of high-sugar diets in children, and the effects of high-fat feeding in college-aged males. She received her bachelor’s degree in human nutrition, foods, and exercise with a concentration in dietetics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Ann L. Yaktine is the director of FNB of the National Academies. FNB applies scientific knowledge to advise the nation on policies related to food, nutrition, and food safety, and their roles in health maintenance and disease prevention. In her role as director, she is responsible for developing, implementing, and managing the board’s activities, as well as engaging FNB members in strategic planning to identify important and emerging issues in nutrition, food sciences, and food safety. Dr. Yaktine is a 2008 recipient of the Institute of Medicine’s Cecil Award. In 2009 she participated in the Korea-U.S. Symposium on the Science of Food Safety Assessment. She has published journal reports on nutrition and cancer, nutrients and contaminants in foods, and nutrition assistance programs. Dr. Yaktine is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Nutrition. She holds a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Kansas and a Ph.D. in biochemistry and cancer biology from the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 258
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 259
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24883.
×
Page 264
Next: Appendix G: Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest »
Redesigning the Process for Establishing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $68.00 Buy Ebook | $54.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

What foods should Americans eat to promote their health, and in what amounts? What is the scientific evidence that supports specific recommendations for dietary intake to reduce the risk of multifactorial chronic disease? These questions are critically important because dietary intake has been recognized to have a role as a key determinant of health.

As the primary federal source of consistent, evidence-based information on dietary practices for optimal nutrition, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) have the promise to empower Americans to make informed decisions about what and how much they eat to improve health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. The adoption and widespread translation of the DGA requires that they be universally viewed as valid, evidence-based, and free of bias and conflicts of interest to the extent possible. However, this has not routinely been the case.

A first short report meant to inform the 2020 review cycle explored how the advisory committee selection process can be improved to provide more transparency, eliminate bias, and include committee members with a range of viewpoints. This second and final report recommends changes to the DGA process to reduce and manage sources of bias and conflicts of interest, improve timely opportunities for engagement by all interested parties, enhance transparency, and strengthen the science base of the process.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!