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Simulation Options for Airport Planning (2019)

Chapter: References

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Page 48
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Simulation Options for Airport Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25573.
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Page 48
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Simulation Options for Airport Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25573.
×
Page 49

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48 Barnhart, C., P. Belobaba, P., and A. R. Odoni. Applications of Operations Research in the Air Transport Industry. Transportation Science, Vol. 37, Issue 4, Nov. 2003, pp. 368–391. Boesel, J., C. Gladstone, J. Hoffman, P. Massimini, C. Shiotsuki, and B. Simmons. TAAM Best Practices Guideline. MITRE Technical Report 01W0000092. McLean, Va., Sept. 2001. Bouarfa, S., H. Blom, R. Curran, and M. Everdij. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation of Emergent Behavior in Air Transportation., Complex Adaptive Systems Modeling. 1:15, Aug. 2013, pp. 1–26. DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung GmbH. Fast-Time Simulation Report–DFS Reference 2014–228. DFS, Langen, Germany, Jan. 2015. Duncan, G., and H. Johnson. Development and Application of a Dynamic Simulation Model for Airport Curb- sides. In The 2020 Vision of Air Transportation: Emerging Issues and Innovative Solutions, S.S. Nambisan, American Society of Civil Engineers, San Francisco, Cal., 2000, pp. 153–164. FAA. Chicago O’Hare International Airport–Final EIS. FAA, Washington, D.C., July 2005. FAA. Record of Decision for Capacity Enhancement Program at Philadelphia International Airport. FAA, New York, Dec. 2010. FAA. FAA Regulations and Policies. FAA, Washington, D.C., Oct. 2017. https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/ policy_guidance/benefit_cost/. Accessed Oct. 25, 2017. Fayez, M., A. Kaylani, D. Cope, N. Rychlik, and M. Mollaghasemi. Managing Airport Operations Using Simula- tion. Journal of Simulation. Vol. 2, Issue 1, 2008, pp. 41–52. Gosling, G. D. Airport Landside Planning Techniques, Introduction. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1199, 1988. Guizzi, G., T. Murino, and E. Romano. A Discrete Event Simulation to Model Passenger Flow in the Airport Terminal. Mathematical Methods and Applied Computing–Volume II. WSEAS Press, Athens, Greece, 2009. Harris, T. M., M. Nourinejad, and M. J. Roorda. A Mesoscopic Simulation Model for Airport Curbside Manage- ment. Journal of Advanced Transportation, Vol. 2017, Article ID 4950425, July 2017, pp. 1–19. Kuzminski, P. C. An Improved runwaySimulator–Simulation for Runway System Capacity Estimation. Presented at Integrated Communications, Navigation and Surveillance Conference (ICNS), Herndon, Va., 2013. Landrum & Brown et al. ACRP Report 25: Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, Volume 1: Guidebook. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2010. LeighFisher; Dowling Associates, Inc.; and JD Franz Research, Inc. ACRP Report 40: Airport Curbside and Termi- nal Area Roadway Operations. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2010. LeighFisher; Landrum & Brown; CDM Smith; George Mason University; University of California, Berkeley; and Presentation & Design, Inc. ACRP Report 79: Evaluating Airfield Capacity. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2012. Manley, M., Y. Kim, K. Christensen, and A. Chen. Modeling Emergency Evacuation of Individuals with Dis- abilities. Journal of the Transportation Research Board. Vol. 2206, 2011, pp. 32–38. Nelson, B. L. Some Tactical Problems in Digital Simulation for the next 10 years. Journal of Simulation, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2016, pp. 2–11. Savrasovs, M., A. Medvedev, and E. Sincova. Riga Airport Baggage Handling System Simulation. Presented at 23rd European Conference on Modeling and Simulation, Madrid, Spain, 2009. Sillard, L., F. Vergne, and B. Desart. TAAM Operational Evaluation. Eurocontrol Experimental Center Report No. 351–Project SIM-S-E8, Bretigny, France, Aug. 2000. References

References 49 Solak, S., J.-P. B. Clarke, and E. L. Johnson. Airport Terminal Capacity Planning. Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Vol. 43, Issue 6, July 2009, pp. 659–676. TransSolutions; Futterman Consulting; Harris Miller Miller and Hanson, Inc; and Jasenka Rakas. ACRP Report 104: Defining and Measuring Aircraft Delay and Airport Capacity Thresholds. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2014. Wilson, I., and F. Hafner. Benefit Assessment of Using Continuous Descent Approaches at Atlanta. Presentation at 24th Digital Avionics and Systems Conference (DASC), Washington, D.C., 2005.

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Global business and tourism depend heavily on the efficient operation of airports and movement of passengers, baggage, and cargo across many areas. With increasing demand and connectivity requirements for airports comes the need for more sophisticated simulation and modeling tools to validate design assumptions.

Furthermore, airport design and planning decisions have significant impacts on policy and major capital improvement decisions, which can be supported by simulation and modeling tools at many levels.

ACRP Synthesis 98: Simulation Options for Airport Planning is the result of the collection and analysis of information on current industry practices and on applications of simulation tools for airport planning and design. Credible simulation projects can help airport administrators, designers, engineers, and planners estimate the impact of planned changes on passenger traffic, aircraft traffic, roadway traffic, baggage movements, and other subsystems such as bus and train links and aircraft ground support operations.

The toolsets and processes used to analyze and simulate airport operations have changed significantly since the 1980s, when analysis techniques were limited to general purpose queuing and network analysis concepts or purpose-built simulation tools. These tools have become much more sophisticated and accurate in emulating real-world aircraft, passenger, and vehicle dynamics.

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