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Undersea Vehicles and National Needs (1996)

Chapter: B Foreign Developments

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Suggested Citation:"B Foreign Developments." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
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APPENDIX C Development of Deep Submersible Vehicles in the United States: 1958–1994

Date

Submersible

Status

1958

TRIESTE

Retired, 1964

1959

1960

1961

SPORTSMAN 300

Retired (ca 1965)

1962

PC3-X

Retired (ca 1978)

1963

PC-3B

Retired (ca 1967)

 

SPORTSMAN 600

Retired (ca 1967)

 

STAR I

Retired (ca 1966)

1964

ASHERAH

Retired (ca 1970)

 

ALUMINAUT

Retired (ca 1974)

 

ALVIN

Active (modified 1973)

 

DEEP JEEP

Retired (ca 1967)

 

PERRY PC 3A (2 bit)

Retired, 1975

 

TRIESTE II

Retired, 1966

1965

DEEP STAR 4000

Retired (ca 1972)

1966

HIKINO

Retired (ca 1968)

 

MORAY

Retired (ca 1969)

 

STAR II

Retired, 1991

 

STAR III

Retired (ca 1974)

 

TRIESTE II (No. 2)

Retired, 1982

 

KITTREDGE K-250

(41 built from 1966–1980; most are retired)

1967

DEEP QUEST

 

 

PAULO I (SEA OTTER)

Retired (ca 1988)

 

 

Inactive

1968

BEAVER

Retired (ca 1985)

 

BEN FRANKLIN

Retired (ca 1971)

 

DEEP DIVER (PLC4)

Retired (ca 1972)

 

DOWB

Retired (ca 1972)

 

SHELF DIVER

Inactive

 

TURTLE

Active (modified 1985)

 

NEKTON ALPHA

Inactive

1969

DEEPSTAR 2000

Retired (ca 1977)

 

KUMUKAHI

Retired (ca 1973)

 

NR-1

Active

 

SNOOPER

Active

1970

DSRV-1

Active

 

NEKTON BETA

Inactive

 

NEMO

Retired

 

SEA CLIFF

Active (modified 1982)

 

SURVEY SUB 1 (PC-9)

Retired (ca 1974)

Suggested Citation:"B Foreign Developments." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×

Date

Submersible

Status

1971

DEEP VIEW

Retired (ca 1973)

 

DSRV-2

Active

 

MAKAKAI

Retired (ca 1975)

 

NEKTON GAMMA

Active

 

SEA-LINK I

Active

1972

OPSUB (PERRY)

Retired (ca 1974)

 

SEA RANGER

Retired (ca 1980)

1973

1974

PC-14C-1 CLELIA

Active

 

(ex DIAPHUS)

 

1975

SEA-LINK II

Active

 

PERRY PC-14C-2

Active

1976

PISCES VI

Inactive

1977

1978

PIONEER I

Inactive

1979

1980

1981

1982

DELTA

Active

1983

PERRY PC-1805

Inactive

1984

DEEP ROVER

Active

NOTES: This table does not include ROVs or AUVs. DSVs in bold italics were developed by U.S. Navy. This table does not include one-off and backyard submersibles. The line between inactive and retired is not precise. In general, inactive refers to DSVs that can be put back into service without excessive restoration. Retired designates submersibles that cannot be put back into service, have been given to museums, junked, or are similarly unavailable. During years with dashes, no DSVs were put into service. The submersibles listed were built in the United States and worked at least part of their lives for U.S. companies. Not included are DSVs built by U.S. companies (primarily Perry) and exported or foreign-built DSVs now used by U.S. companies.

Suggested Citation:"B Foreign Developments." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"B Foreign Developments." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
Page 94
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The United States faces decisions requiring information about the oceans in vastly expanded scales of time and space and from oceanic sectors not accessible with the suite of tools now used by scientists and engineers. Advances in guidance and control, communications, sensors, and other technologies for undersea vehicles can provide an opportunity to understand the oceans' influence on the energy and chemical balance that sustains humankind and to manage and deliver resources from and beneath the sea. This book assesses the state of undersea vehicle technology and opportunities for vehicle applications in science and industry. It provides guidance about vehicle subsystem development priorities and describes how national research can be focused most effectively.

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