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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
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A
Workshop Agenda

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR NUTRITION RESEARCH: POTENTIAL FOR ASSESSING MILITARY PERFORMANCE CAPABILITY

A Workshop Sponsored by

Committee on Military Nutrition Research Washington, D.C

Monday, May 22, 1995

I Welcomes and Introduction to the Topic

8:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.

Welcome and Introductions; Robert O. Nesheim; Chair, Committee on Military Nutrition Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×

8:15 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Welcome on Behalf of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command; COL Robert Gifford; USAMRMC, Fort Detrick, Maryland

8:30 a.m.–8:50 a.m.

Emerging Technologies in Nutrition Research for the Military: Overview of the Issues; James A. Vogel; USARIEM, Natick, Massachusetts

(There will be 5 minutes for discussion available after each presentation.)

II BODY COMPOSITION

8:50 a.m.–9:20 a.m.

Military Application of Body Composition Assessment Technologies; MAJ Karl E. Friedl; USAMRMC, Fort Detrick, Maryland

9:20 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

Imaging Techniques of Body Composition: Advantages of Measurement and New Uses; Steven B. Heymsfield; St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York

9:50 a.m.–10:20 a.m.

DXA: Research Issues and Equipment; Wendy M. Kohrt; Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

10:20 a.m.–10:35 a.m.

Coffee Break

10:35 a.m.–11:05 a.m.

Bioelectrical Impedance: A History, Research Issues, and Recent Consensus; Wm. Cameron Chumlea; Wright State University School of Medicine, Yellow Springs, Ohio

11:05 a.m.–11:35 a.m.

General Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×

III ADVANCED TRACER TECHNIQUES AND METABOLISM

11:35 p.m.–12:05 p.m.

Stable Isotope Techniques: The Broad Picture, What Can and Cannot Be Done; Dennis M. Bier; Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, Texas

12:05 p.m.–12:35 p.m.

Energy Substrate Metabolism with Stable Isotope Tracers; Robert R. Wolfe; Shriners Burns Institute and University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston

12:35 p.m.–1:20 p.m.

No-Host Lunch

1:20 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Combined Stable Isotope/Positron Emission Tomography for In Vivo Protein Metabolism Assessment; Vernon R. Young; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

1:50 p.m.–2:20 p.m.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Carbohydrate Metabolism in Humans; Gerald I. Shulman; Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut

2:20 p.m.–2:50 p.m.

Doubly Labeled Water for Energy Expenditure; James P. DeLany; Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

2:50 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

General Discussion

3:20 p.m.–3:35 p.m.

Break

IV TECHNIQUES OF ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND RESPIRATORY EXCHANGE

3:35 p.m.–4:05 p.m.

Measurement of O2 Uptake with Portable Equipment; John F. Patton, III; USARIEM, Natick, Massachusetts

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×

4:05 p.m.–4:35 p.m.

Advances in Ambulatory Monitoring Technologies in the Military: Electronic Sensing; Reed W. Hoyt; USARIEM, Natick, Massachusetts

4:35 p.m.–5:05 p.m.

General Discussion

5:05 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Concluding Remarks; Robert O. Nesheim

Tuesday, May 23, 1995

 

Opening Remarks; Robert O. Nesheim

(There will be 5 minutes for discussion available after each presentation.)

V MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR APPROACHES IN NUTRITION

8:15 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Role of Metals in Gene Expression; Robert J. Cousins; Center for Nutritional Sciences University of Florida, Gainesville

8:45 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Metabolic Regulation of Gene Expression; Howard C. Towle; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

9:15 a.m.–9:45 a.m.

Use of Isolated Cell and Metabolic Techniques Applied to Vitamin Transport and Disposition; Donald B. McCormick; Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

9:45 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Physiologic Stress: Cellular Approaches to Nutrition; Guy M. Miller; Galileo Laboratories, Inc., Sunnyvale, California, and The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

10:15 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×

10:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Urine and Blood Cytokines; Lyle L. Moldawer; University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville

11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Functional Evaluation of the Immune System in Humans; Gabriel Virella; Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston

11:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

New Advances in the Study of Immune Functions: Mucosal Immunity; COL Arthur O. Anderson; USAMRIID, Fort Detrick, Maryland

12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m.

General Discussion

12:30 p.m.–1:15 p.m.

No-Host Lunch

1:15 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Non-Invasive and Other Techniques for Assessment of Plasma Metabolites; Donald Bodenner; University of Rochester, New York

VI FUNCTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL MEASURES OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS

1:45 p.m.–2:15 p.m.

Involuntary Muscle Contraction to Assess Nutritional Status; James S. Hayes; Ross Products Division, Abbott Laboratories, Cleveland, Ohio

2:15 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Application of Cognitive Performance Assessment Technology to Military Nutrition Research; Mary Z. Mays; Eagle Creek Research Services, San Antonio, Texas

2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

New Techniques for Laboratory Measurement of Alertness in Relation to Sleep and Circadian Rhythms; David F. Dinges; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×

3:15 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

New Techniques for Assessment of Mental Performance in the Field; Harris R. Lieberman; USARIEM, Natick, Massachusetts

3:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Measurement of Soldier-Driving Performance and Emerging Simulator Technologies; Ginger S. Watson; Center for Computer-Aided Design, University of Iowa, Iowa City

4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Final Discussion

5:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Closing Remarks; Robert O. Nesheim

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 579
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 580
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 581
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 582
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 583
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Emerging Technologies for Nutrition Research: Potential for Assessing Military Performance Capability. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5827.
×
Page 584
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The latest of a series of publications based on workshops sponsored by the Committee on Military Nutrition Research, this book's focus on emerging technologies for nutrition research arose from a concern among scientists at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine that traditional nutrition research, using standard techniques, centered more on complex issues of the maintenance or enhancement of performance, and might not be sufficiently substantive either to measure changes in performance or to predict the effects on performance of stresses soldiers commonly experience in operational environments. The committee's task was to identify and evaluate new technologies to determine whether they could help resolve important issues in military nutrition research. The book contains the committee's summary and recommendations as well as individually authored chapters based on presentations at a 1995 workshop. Other chapters cover techniques of body composition assessment, tracer techniques for the study of metabolism, ambulatory techniques for the determination of energy expenditure, molecular and cellular approaches to nutrition, the assessment of immune function, and functional and behavioral measures of nutritional status.

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