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Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach (1999)

Chapter: Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Appendix H Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications

World Ocean Circulation Experiment (Woce)

(Note that the U.S. WOCE bibliography presently consists of over 600 titles; the international bibliography contains over 2000 titles.

Cornuelle, B. D., Morris, M. Y. and D. H. Roemmich, 1993. An objective mapping for estimating geostrophic velocity from hydrographic sections including the equator. J. Geophys. Res. 98, 18, 109-18,118.


Davis, R. E., Webb, D. C., Regier, L. A. and J. Dufour, 1992. The Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (ALACE). J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 9, 264-285.

Deep-Sea Research, 43 (2-3), 1996. Special issue on the results from time-series stations at Hawaii and Bermuda. (Joint WOCE/JGOFS operations.)


Fu, L.L. and R. D. Smith, 1996. Global ocean circulation from satellite altimetry and high-resolution computer simulation. Bull. Amer. Met. Soc. 77, 2,625-2,636.


Joyce, T. M. and P. Robbins, 1996. The long-term hydrographic record at Bermuda. J. Climate, 9, 3121-3131.


Ledwell, J. R., Watson, A. J. and C. S. Law, 1993. Evidence for slow mixing across the pycnocline from an open-ocean tracer-release experiment. Nature, 364, 701-703.


MacDonald, A. M. and C. Wunsch, 1996. An estimate of global ocean circulation and heat fluxes. Nature, 382, 436-439.


Parrilla, G., Lavin, A., Bryden, H., Garcia, M. and R. Millard, 1994. Rising

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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temperatures in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean over the past 35 years. Nature, 369, 48-51.

Polzin, K.L., Toole, J. M., Ledwell, J. R. and R. W. Schmitt, 1997. Spatial variability of turbulent mixing in the abyssal ocean. Science , 276, 93-96.

Semtner, A. J. and R. M. Chervin, 1992. Ocean general circulation from a global eddy-resolving model. J. Geophys. Res., 97, 5,493-5,550.

Sprintall, J., Roemich, D., Stanton, B. and R. Bailey, 1995. Regional climate variability and ocean heat transport in the southwest Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 100, 15,865-15,871.


White, W. B. and R. G. Peterson, 1996. An Antarctic circumpolar wave in surface pressure, wind, temperature and sea-ice extent. Nature, 380, 699-702.

WOCE Hydrographic Office, 1991. WOCE Hydrographic Operations and Methods Manual. Report 91-1, WOCE Hydrographic Progamme Office, Woods Hole.)

Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (Jgofs)

Karl, D.M. & A.F. Michaels, guest editors. Ocean Time-Series: Results from the Hawaii and Bermuda Research Programs. Deep-Sea Research, Part II. Vol. 43, nos. 2-3. 1996.

Murray, J.W., guest editor. A U.S. JGOFS Process Study in the Equatorial Pacific. Deep-Sea Research, Part II. Vol. 42, nos. 2- 3. 1995.

Murray, J.W., guest editor. A U.S. JGOFS Process Study in the Equatorial Pacific, Part II. Deep-Sea Research, Part II. Vol. 43, nos. 4-6. 1996.

Murray, J.W., R.T. Barber, M. Roman, M.P. Bacon, and R.A. Feely (1994). Physical and biological controls on carbon cycling in the equatorial Pacific. Science, 266: 58-65, U.S. JGOFS Contribution Number 107.

Sarmiento, J. L., and C. Le Quéré (1996). Oceanic carbon dioxide uptake in a model of century-scale global warming. Science, 274: 1346-1350, U.S. JGOFS Contribution Number 363.

Sarmiento, J.L., R.D. Slater, M.J.R. Fasham, H.W. Ducklow, J.R. Toggweiler, and G.T. Evans (1993). A seasonal three-dimensional ecosystem model of nitrogen cycling in the North Atlantic euphotic zone. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 7: 417–450 U.S. JGOFS Contribution Number 125.

Eglinton, G., H. Elderfield, M. Whitfield, and P. J. LeB. Williams, 1995. The role of the North Atlantic in the global carbon cycle. Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London (Biological Sciences) 348: 121-264.

Hanson, R., H. Ducklow, and J.G. Field, 1997. The Changing Carbon Cycle in the Oceans: The Joint Global Ocean Flux Study at Mid-life. Cambridge University Press. (Vol. 2 of the IGBP Global Change Series).

Ridge Inter-Disciplinary Global Experiments (Ridge)

RIDGE has not maintained a list of publications by principal investigator, although it is planning to begin the collection of one. The easiest RIDGE

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×

publications to cite are therefore the RIDGE Theoretical Institute volumes that have been published as AGU Monographs.

Mantle Flow and Melt Generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges - 1992, Jason Phipps Morgan, Donna K. Blackman, John M. Sinton (Editors), AGU Geophysical Monograph 71, 361p.

Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems: Physical, Chemical, Biological, and Geological Interactions - 1995, Susan E. Humphris, Robert A. Zierenberg, Lauren S. Mullineaux, and Richard E. Thomson (Editors); AGU Geophysical Monograph 91, 466p.

Faulting and Magmatism at Mid-Ocean Ridges; Roger Buck (Editor); (Approved by AGU for a Monograph series volume).

Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics Program (Globec)

Hastings, A., and K. Higgins. 1994. Persistence of transients in spatially structured ecological models. Science. 263:1133-1136.

Werner, F.W., et al. 1993. Influence of mean 3-D advection and simple behavior on the distribution of cod and haddock early life stages on Georges Bank. Fish. Oceanogr. 2:43-64.

Franks, P.J.S., and J. Marra. 1994. A simple new formulation for phytoplankton photoresponse and an application in a wind-driven mixed-layer model. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 111:143-153.

Mangel, M., and C. Tier. 1994. Four facts every conservation biologists should know about persistence . Ecology. 75:607-614.

U.S. Science Support Program (USSSP)/Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)

Note: JOI solicited USSAC's help to answer this question, and received over 100 nominations for ODP's highest profile publications (with a U.S. scientist as first author). What I (Ellen Kappel, USSSP Program Director) decided to provide is a diverse list of publications (though it is weighted quite heavily toward paleoceanography), rather than only those that might be listed as the top ten in a citation index. I could not cull the input to ten articles. My apologies.

Behl, R.J., and Kennett, J.P., 1996. Brief interstadial events in the Santa Barbara basin, NE Pacific, during the past 60 kyr. Nature, 379:243-246.


Clement, B.M., Kent, D.V., and Opdyke, N.D., 1996, A synthesis of magneto-stratigraphic results from Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments cored using the hydraulic piston corer, Paleoceanography, 11, 299-308.


deMenocal, P. B., Plio-Pleistocene African Climate, Science, 270, 53-59, 1995.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×

D'Hondt, S., and Arthur, M.A., 1996, Late Cretaceous oceans and the cool tropic paradox. Science, 271:1838-1841.

Dickens, G.R., C.K. Paull, P. Wallace, and ODP Leg 164 Science Party, Direct measurement of in situ methane quantities in a large gas-hydrate reservoir, Nature, 385, 426-428, 1997.

Flower, B.P., and Kennett, J.P., 1994, The middle Miocene climatic transition: East Antarctic ice sheet development, deep ocean circulation and global carbon cycling. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimat., Palaeoecol., 108:537-555.


Huber, B.T., Hodell, D.A., and Hamilton, C.P., 1995, Middle-Late Cretaceous climate of the southern high latitudes: stable isotopic evidence for minimal equator-to-pole thermal gradients. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 107:1164-1191.

Humphris, S.E. et al., The internal structure of an active seafloor massive sulphide deposit, Nature 377, 713-716, 1995.


Kennett, J.P., and L.D. Stott, Abrupt deep-sea warming, paleoceanographic changes, and benthic extinctions at the end of the Paleocene, Nature, 353, 319-322, 1991.


Larson, R.L., 1991, Latest pulse of Earth: evidence for a mid-Cretaceous superplume. Geology, 19:547-550.

Lyle, M., Dadey, K.A., and Farrell, J.W., 1995, The late Miocene (11-8 Ma) eastern Pacific carbonate crash: evidence for reorganization of deep-water circulation by the closure of the Panama gateway, in, Pisias, N.G., Mayer, L.A., Janecek, T.R., Palmer-Julson, A., and van Andel, T.H. (eds.), Proceedings of the ODP, Scientific Results, Vol. 138. College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), 821-838.


McManus, J.F., G.C. Bond, W.S. Broecker, S. Johnsen, L. Labeyrie, and S. Higgins, High-resolution climate records from the North Atlantic during the last interglacial, Nature, 371, 326-329, 1994.

Miller, K.G., Fairbanks, R. G., and Mountain, G. S., 1987. Tertiary isotope synthesis, sea level history, and continental margin erosion. Paleoceanography, 2, 1-20.

(Note that this paper was all DSDP sites, so may be not suitable for an ODP review, however, it represents one of the most-often reproduced figures available. It also represents the integration of sea level with oxygen isotopes, brought to further maturity in.

Miller, K.G., Mountain, G.S., and the Leg 150 Shipboard Party and Members of the New Jersey Coastal Plain Drilling Project (1996) Drilling and dating New Jersey Oligocene-Miocene sequences: Ice volume, global sea level, and Exxon records, Science 271: 1092-1095.

Mix, A., N. Pisias, W. Rugh, J. Wilson, A. Morey, and T.K. Hagelberg, Benthic foraminifer stable isotope record from Site 849 (0-5 Ms): Local and global

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×

climate changes, in, Pisias, N.G., Mayer, L.A., Janecek, T.R., Palmer-Julson, A., and van Andel, T.H. (eds.), Proceedings of the ODP, Scientific Results, Vol. 138. College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), 371-412/

Plank, T. and C.H. Langmuir, Tracing trace elements from sediment input to volcanic output at subduction zones, Nature, 362, 739-743, 1993.


Raymo, M. E., and Ruddiman, W. F., 1992. Tectonic forcing of late Cenozoic climate. Nature, 359: 117-122.


Schrag, D.P., Hampt, G., and Murray, D.W., 1996. Pore fluid constraints on the temperature and oxygen isotopic composition of the glacial ocean, Science 272: 1930-1932.


Zachos, J.C., Stott, L.D., and Lohmann, K.C., 1994, Evolution of early Cenozoic marine temperatures. Paleoceanography, 9:353-387.

Shipley, T.H., G.F. Moore, N.L. Bangs, J.C. Moore, and P.L. Stoffa, Seismically inferred dilatancy distribution, northern Barbados ridge decollement: implications for fluid migration and fault strength, Geology, 22, 411-414, 1994.

Kastner, M., H. Elderfield, J.B. Martin, Fluids in covergent margins: what do we know about their composition, origin, role in diagenesis and importance for oceanic chemical fluxes? Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, 335, 275-288, 1991.

Kelley, D.S., Methane rich fluids in the oceanic crust, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 2943-2962, 1996.

Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)

CoOP has just funded the synthesis phase of its first pilot project and solicited proposals for its first major process study.

Climate Variability And Predictability Program/Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Program (Clivar/Goals)

CLIVAR/GOALS is a new program.

Tropical Oceans-Global Atmosphere (Toga)

A number of NRC reports and papers are listed in the report, NRC, 1996. Learning to Predict the Climate Variations Associated with ENSO: Accomplishments and Legacies of the TOGA Program. National Academy Press.

There was a joint special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) for COARE Feb. 1991. There will be a joint JGR issue of final TOGA Papers, hopefully ere this year is out. There are several hundred prediction papers that TOGA spawned maintained on a website at:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/coare/

But more than the papers, TOGA left new institutions: The IRI now exists, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) changed its name and function to include climate prediction, there are a number of prediction centers throughout the United States, and the rest of the world, and the TAO array is undergoing transition to the first operational oceanography array in support of prediction. There are new institutions to look at the applications of ENSO predictions. Much of this is described in NRC (1996) cited above.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 146
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 148
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Major U.S. Oceanographic Research Programs: Major Publications." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 149
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During recent years, large-scale investigations into global climate change and other highly visible issues have taken the lion's share of declining research funds. At the same time, funding for basic research in such core disciplines as physical oceanography, biological oceanography, chemical oceanography, and marine geology has dwindled.

Global Ocean Science examines how the largest U.S. ocean research programs, such as the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), have significantly contributed to our understanding of the oceans. The book examines the impact of these programs on research, education, and collegiality within this diverse scientific community and offers recommendations to help ensure a vital future for ocean science, including:

Specific results of the programs such as data collected, conceptual breakthroughs, information published, demonstrable use of program products, incorporation of new knowledge into education, and contribution to policymaking and decisionmaking by federal agencies.

Mechanisms for efficiently identifying knowledge gaps and research questions, strategic planning of research programs, managing competitive proposals, securing needed resources, and more.

This practical book will be welcomed by ocean investigators, users of oceanographic research findings, policymakers, administrators, educators, and students.

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