National Academies Press: OpenBook

Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary (2007)

Chapter: Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations

« Previous: Appendix F. Listing of Possible Topics for Research Identified by Individuals During the Workshop
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×

G
Acronyms and Abbreviations

25-(OH)D 25-hydroxyvitamin D

ACE Angiotensin converting enzyme

ADMIT Atherosclerotic Disease Multiple Intervention Trial

AI Adequate Intake

AMDR Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range

ARBITER Trial Arterial Biology for the Investigation for the Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol

AREDS Age-Related Macular Degeneration Study

BP Blood pressure

CNPP Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

CRIC Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

CRP C-reactive protein

CSFII Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals

cSHMT Cytoplasmic serine hydroxymethyltransferase

C-SIDE Software that implements methods to estimate the usual intake distributions, available through Iowa State University

CVD Cardiovascular disease

DBP Diastolic blood pressure

DFE Dietary folate equivalents

DHA Docosahexaenoic acid

DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid

DRI Dietary Reference Intake

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×

EAR Estimated Average Requirement

EDTA Ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid

EPA Eicosapentaenoic acid

ERS Economic Research Service

FAD Flavin-adenine dinucleotide

FAO Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations

FMN Flavin mononucleotide

GI Gastrointestinal

HDL-C High-density lipoprotein cholesterol

HIV Human immunodeficiency virus

IAAB Indicator amino acid balance

IAAO Indicator amino acid oxidation

ISU Iowa State University

LDL Low-density lipoprotein

MeSH Medical Subject Heading

MTHFD1 Methyl-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1

MTHFR Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase

NAP National Academies Press

NCI National Cancer Institute

NHANES National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey—a survey conducted periodically by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

NHBLI National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

NIH National Institutes of Health

NYC Health Dept New York City Health Department

OPEN Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition Study

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×

PEMT Phosphatidylethanolamin-N-methyltransferase

PLCO Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Cohort

PLS-DA Partial Least Squares for Discriminant Analysis. A multivariate inverse least squares discrimination method used to classify samples

PTH Parathyroid hormone

RAE Retinol activity equivalents

RDA Recommended Dietary Allowance

SBP Systolic blood pressure

SELECT Selenium and Vitamin E Chemoprevention Trial

SNDA School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Studies

SNP Single nucleotide polymorphism

SUVIMAX Suppléments en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioydants

TEE Total Energy Expenditure

TfR Transferrin receptor

TNF-alpha Tumor necrosis factor-alpha

UL Tolerable Upper Intake Level

USDA U.S. Department of Agriculture

WHO World Health Organization

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×
Page 295
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×
Page 296
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×
Page 297
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G. Acronyms and Abbreviations." Institute of Medicine. 2007. Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11767.
×
Page 298
Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $86.00 Buy Ebook | $69.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

What information is available to inform the planning of a nutrition research agenda for the United States and Canada? This question provided the backdrop for the Dietary Reference Intakes Research Synthesis project undertaken by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) are quantitative reference values for recommended intakes and tolerable upper intake levels for a range of nutrients. They are used widely by dietitians in individual counseling, by federal nutrition officials in program and policy development, and by the nutrition research and education communities in government, academia, and industry.

Between 1997 and 2005, the IOM published a series of six DRI reports covering a total of 45 nutrients, energy, and other food components. The IOM also issued two reports describing ways to apply the DRIs in assessment and planning. Together, these eight reports contain more than 450 research recommendations and thus a wealth of information pertinent to a nutrition research agenda. To make the recommendations more accessible, the Food and Nutrition Board undertook a project with two major elements: (1) the development of a searchable database of all the DRI research recommendations, and (2) the Dietary Reference Intakes

Research Synthesis Workshop, held June 7-8, 2006, which was designed to provide a venue for hearing and discussing experts' perspectives on the research recommendations identified in the DRI reports.

Two members of the workshop planning group—Drs. John W. Suttie and Susan J. Whiting—moderated the DRI Research Synthesis Workshop. After an overview and demonstration of the DRI Research Synthesis Database, panels of experts addressed DRI research recommendations related to each of the six DRI nutrient reports, the two DRI applications reports, and three cross-cutting topics: (1) setting DRIs for children, (2) Tolerable Upper Intake Levels, and (3) relevant new and underutilized research techniques. This report is a summary of the workshop presentations and discussions.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!