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Suggested Citation:"B Information-Gathering Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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B

Information-Gathering Meetings

April 15, 2014, by telephone

Briefings from Irene Qualters, National Science Foundation (NSF), and Peter Arzberger, NSF

May 16, 2014, Washington, D.C.

Briefings from Michael Norman, San Diego Supercomputer Center; Michael Vogelius, NSF; Bogdan Mihaila, NSF; Jeryl Mumpower, NSF; and Eva Zanzerkia, NSF

November 19, 2014, Birds-of-a-feather session at SC-14, New Orleans, Louisiana

December 16-17, 2014, Workshop in Mountain View, California

Participants: Christian Ott, Caltech; Thomas Cheatham, University of Utah; Tom Jordan, University of Southern California; Steven Gottlieb, Indiana University; Tony Hey, Microsoft, by telephone; Ilkay Altintas, San Diego Supercomputer Center; Jacek Becla, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Victoria Stodden, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and Ed Lazowska, University of Washington

Suggested Citation:"B Information-Gathering Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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February 19, 2015

Briefings from Jim Kurose, NSF; Irene Qualters, NSF; Rudi Eigenmann, NSF; and Steven Binkley, Department of Energy Office of Science

Suggested Citation:"B Information-Gathering Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"B Information-Gathering Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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Page 130
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Advanced computing capabilities are used to tackle a rapidly growing range of challenging science and engineering problems, many of which are compute- and data-intensive as well. Demand for advanced computing has been growing for all types and capabilities of systems, from large numbers of single commodity nodes to jobs requiring thousands of cores; for systems with fast interconnects; for systems with excellent data handling and management; and for an increasingly diverse set of applications that includes data analytics as well as modeling and simulation. Since the advent of its supercomputing centers, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has provided its researchers with state-of-the-art computing systems. The growth of new models of computing, including cloud computing and publically available by privately held data repositories, opens up new possibilities for NSF.

In order to better understand the expanding and diverse requirements of the science and engineering community and the importance of a new broader range of advanced computing infrastructure, the NSF requested that the National Research Council carry out a study examining anticipated priorities and associated tradeoffs for advanced computing. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020 provides a framework for future decision-making about NSF’s advanced computing strategy and programs. It offers recommendations aimed at achieving four broad goals: (1) position the U.S. for continued leadership in science and engineering, (2) ensure that resources meet community needs, (3) aid the scientific community in keeping up with the revolution in computing, and (4) sustain the infrastructure for advanced computing.

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