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Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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C

Biosketches of Committee Members

WILLIAM D. GROPP, Co-Chair, is the Thomas M. Siebel Chair in Computer Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he is also founding director of the Parallel Computing Institute. He held the positions of assistant (1982-1988) and associate (1988-1990) professor in the Computer Science Department at Yale University. In 1990, he joined the Numerical Analysis group at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), where he was a senior computer scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division, a senior scientist in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago, and a senior fellow in the Argonne-Chicago Computation Institute. From 2000 through 2006, he was deputy director of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at ANL. In 2007, he joined the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, as the Paul and Cynthia Saylor Professor in the Department of Computer Science. In 2008, he was appointed deputy director for research for the Institute of Advanced Computing Applications and Technologies at the University of Illinois. His research interests are in parallel computing, software for scientific computing, and numerical methods for partial differential equations. He has played a major role in the development of the MPI message-passing standard, is one of the designers of the PETSc parallel numerical library, and has developed efficient and scalable parallel algorithms for the solution of linear and non-linear equations. Dr. Gropp is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and a member of the National Academy

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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of Engineering. He received the Sidney Fernbach Award from the IEEE Computer Society in 2008 and the Technical Committee on Scalable Computing Award for Excellence in Scalable Computing in 2010. Dr. Gropp received his B.S. in mathematics from Case Western Reserve University, an M.S. in physics from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University.

ROBERT J. HARRISON, Co-Chair, is director, Institute of Advanced Scientific Computing, Stony Brook University, and director, Computational Science Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The core mission of the new Stony Brook institute is to advance the science of computing and its applications to solving complex problems in the physical sciences, the life sciences, medicine, sociology, industry, and finance. The institute works closely with the Brookhaven center, which specializes in data-intensive computing. Dr. Harrison’s research interests are focused on scientific computing and the development of computational chemistry methods for the world’s most technologically advanced supercomputers. From 2002 to 2012, he was director of the Joint Institute of Computational Science and professor of chemistry and corporate fellow at the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior positions were at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and ANL. He has a prolific career in high-performance computing, with more than 100 publications on the subject, as well as extensive service on national advisory committees. He received his B.A. from Churchill College, University of Cambridge, and his Ph.D. in organic and theoretical chemistry from the University of Cambridge.

MARK R. ABBOTT is president and director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He was previously dean of the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University (OSU). Prior to his appointment at OSU, he served as a member of the technical staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and as a research oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Abbott’s research focuses on the interaction of biological and physical processes in the upper ocean and relies on both remote sensing and field observations. He is a pioneer in the use of satellite ocean color data to study coupled physical/biological processes. As part of a NASA Earth Observing System interdisciplinary science team, Dr. Abbott led an effort to link remotely sensed data of the Southern Ocean with coupled ocean circulation/ecosystem models. His field research included the first deployment of an array of bio-optical moorings in the Southern Ocean as part of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. Dr. Abbott was a member of the National Science Board from 2006 to 2012 and served as a consultant to the board until 2013. He is the

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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vice chair of the Oregon Global Warming Commission. He is currently a member of the board of trustees for the Consortium for Ocean Leadership and the board of trustees of NEON, Inc. His past advisory posts include chairing the Coastal Ocean Applications and Science Team for NOAA and chairing the U.S. Joint Global Flux Study Science Steering Committee. He has also been a member of the Director’s Advisory Council for JPL and NASA’s MODIS and SeaWiFS science teams and the Earth Observing System Investigators Working Group. He was the 2011 recipient of the Jim Gray eScience Award, presented by Microsoft Research. Dr. Abbott is a national associate member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and is currently a member of the Space Studies Board, chair of the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space, a member of the Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program, and a member of the Panel on the Review of the Draft 2013 National Climate Assessment (NCA) Report. As part of his prolific service to the Academies, Dr. Abbott served on the Committee on Evaluating NASA’s Strategic Direction, the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs, the Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions, and the Panel on Land-Use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics and Biodiversity for the 2007 Earth science and applications from space decadal survey. Dr. Abbott received his B.S. in conservation of natural resources from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California.

ROBERT L. GROSSMAN is a faculty member at the University of Chicago. He is the director of the Center for Data Intensive Science, a senior fellow and core faculty in the Computation Institute and the Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, and a professor of medicine in the Section of Genetic Medicine. He also serves as the chief research informatics officer for the Biological Sciences Division. His research group focuses on data-intensive computing, data science, and bioinformatics. He is the founder and a partner of Open Data Group, which provides analytic services to help companies build predictive models over big data, and is the director of the not-for-profit Open Cloud Consortium, which provides cloud computing infrastructure to support the research community. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2013. Dr. Grossman earned his Ph.D. in applied mathematics at Princeton University and an A.B. in mathematics from Harvard University.

PETER M. KOGGE is a professor of computer science and engineering and concurrent professor of electrical engineering at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Kogge was with IBM, Federal Systems Division, from

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×

1968 until 1994, and was appointed an IEEE fellow in 1990 and an IBM fellow in 1993. In 1977, he was a visiting professor in the ECE Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. From 1977 through 1994, he was also an adjunct professor in the Computer Science Department of the State University of New York at Binghamton. In 1994, he joined the University of Notre Dame as first holder of the endowed McCourtney Chair in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE). Starting in the summer of 1997, he has been a distinguished visiting scientist at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems at JPL. He is also the research thrust leader for architecture in Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology. For the 2000-2001 academic year, he was the Interim Schubmehl-Prein Chairman of the CSE Department at Notre Dame. From August 2001 until December 2008, he was the associate dean for research, College of Engineering; since fall 2003, he has been a concurrent professor of electrical engineering. His current research areas include massively parallel processing architectures, advanced VLSI and nanotechnologies and their relationship to computing systems architectures, non von Neumann models of programming and execution, parallel algorithms and applications, and their impact on computer architecture. While at IBM, one of his groups designed the first multi-processor PIM device with significant DRAM memory that may also be the world’s first multicore chip. A paper on its architecture received the Daniel Slotnick Award at the 1994 International Conference on Parallel Processing. Dr. Kogge also designed and built the RTAIS parallel processor. Prior parallel machines included the IBM 3838 Array Processor and the space shuttle input/output processor (IOP), which probably represents the first true parallel processor to fly in space and is one of the earliest examples of multi-threaded architectures. Dr. Kogge received the IEEE Seymour Cray Award in 2012 and the IEEE Charles Babbage Award in 2014. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Notre Dame, his M.S. in systems and engineering from Syracuse University, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

PADMA RAGHAVAN is the associate vice president for research and director of strategic initiatives at the Pennsylvania State University, where she is also a distinguished professor of computer science and engineering. Dr. Raghavan is the founding director of the Penn State Institute for CyberScience, the coordinating unit on campus for developing interdisciplinary computation and data-enabled science and engineering. Prior to joining Penn State in 2000, she served as an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Tennessee. Her research is in the area of high-performance computing and computational science and engineering. She has more than 95 peer-reviewed publications in three major areas, including scalable parallel computing;

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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energy-aware supercomputing (i.e., performance and power scalability of advanced computer systems); and computational modeling, simulation, and knowledge extraction. Dr. Raghavan currently serves on the editorial boards of the SIAM book series Computational Science and Engineering and Software, Environments and Tools, the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, the Journal of Computational Science, and IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems. She serves on the program committees of major conferences sponsored by ACM, IEEE, and SIAM, and she co-chaired Technical Papers for Supercomputing 2012 and the 2011 SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering. Dr. Raghavan also serves on various advisory and review boards, including the Academies’ Panel on Digitization and Communication Science, the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation, and the Computer Research Association’s (CRA’s) Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research. She is a fellow of the IEEE, and she received an NSF CAREER Award and the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Distinguished Scholar Award from the University of Chicago and ANL for her research on parallel sparse matrix computations. Dr. Raghavan received her Ph.D. in computer science from Penn State.

DANIEL A. REED is currently vice president for research and economic development, as well as a professor of computer science, electrical and computer engineering, and medicine at the University of Iowa. He also holds the University Computational Science and Bioinformatics Chair at Iowa. Dr. Reed was a corporate vice president at Microsoft from 2009 to 2012, responsible for global technology policy and extreme computing, and director of scalable and multicore computing at Microsoft from 2007 until 2009. Prior to Microsoft, he was the founding director of the Renaissance Computing Institute at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he also served as Chancellor’s Eminent Professor and vice chancellor for information technology. Before joining the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 2003, Dr. Reed was director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), and Gutgsell Professor and head of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He was appointed to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) by President Bush in 2006 and served on the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) from 2003 to 2005. As chair of PITAC’s computational science subcommittee, he was lead author of the report Computational Science: Ensuring America’s Competitiveness. On PCAST, he co-chaired the Networking and Information Technology subcommittee (with George Scalise of the Semiconductor Industry Association) and coauthored a report on the Networking and Information Technology Research and

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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Development (NITRD) program called Leadership Under Challenge: Information Technology R&D in Competitive World. He is past chair of the board of directors of CRA and currently serves on its Government Affairs Committee. CRA represents the research interests of the university, national laboratory, and industrial research laboratory communities in computing across North America. Dr. Reed received his B.S. from the University of Missouri, Rolla, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University, all in computer science.

VALERIE TAYLOR is the senior associate dean of academic affairs in the Dwight Look College of Engineering and the Regents Professor and Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. In 2003, she joined Texas A&M as the department head of Computer Science and Engineering, where she remained in that position until 2011. Prior to joining Texas A&M, Dr. Taylor was a member of the faculty in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department at Northwestern University for 11 years. She has authored or coauthored more than 100 papers in the area of high-performance computing. She is also the executive director of the Center for Minorities and People with Disabilities in IT. Dr. Taylor is an IEEE fellow and has received numerous awards for distinguished research and leadership, including the 2001 IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Award for a woman with significant contributions in engineering education, the 2002 Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni Award from the University of California, Berkeley, the 2002 CRA Nico Habermann Award for increasing the diversity in computing, and the 2005 Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. Dr. Taylor is a member of ACM. She earned her B.S. in electrical and computer engineering and M.S. in computer engineering from Purdue University and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.

KATHERINE A. YELICK is a professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, and the associate laboratory director for computing sciences at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Yelick is known for her research in parallel languages, compilers, algorithms, and libraries. She coinvented the UPC and Titanium languages and developed analyses, optimizations, and runtime systems for their implementation. She has also done research on memory hierarchy optimizations, communication-avoiding algorithms, and automatic performance tuning, including developing the first autotuned sparse matrix library. In her current role as associate laboratory director, she manages an organization that includes the National Energy Research

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
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Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the Energy Science Network (ESNet), and the Computational Research Division. She was the director of NERSC from 2008 to 2012. Dr. Yelick has received multiple research and teaching awards, including the Athena award, and she is an ACM fellow and an IEEE senior member. She is a member of the California Council on Science and Technology, the Academies’ Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, and the Science and Technology Committee overseeing research at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. She earned her Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
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Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
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Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 133
Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 134
Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
Page 136
Suggested Citation:"C Biosketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21886.
×
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Advanced computing capabilities are used to tackle a rapidly growing range of challenging science and engineering problems, many of which are compute- and data-intensive as well. Demand for advanced computing has been growing for all types and capabilities of systems, from large numbers of single commodity nodes to jobs requiring thousands of cores; for systems with fast interconnects; for systems with excellent data handling and management; and for an increasingly diverse set of applications that includes data analytics as well as modeling and simulation. Since the advent of its supercomputing centers, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has provided its researchers with state-of-the-art computing systems. The growth of new models of computing, including cloud computing and publically available by privately held data repositories, opens up new possibilities for NSF.

In order to better understand the expanding and diverse requirements of the science and engineering community and the importance of a new broader range of advanced computing infrastructure, the NSF requested that the National Research Council carry out a study examining anticipated priorities and associated tradeoffs for advanced computing. Future Directions for NSF Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and Engineering in 2017-2020 provides a framework for future decision-making about NSF’s advanced computing strategy and programs. It offers recommendations aimed at achieving four broad goals: (1) position the U.S. for continued leadership in science and engineering, (2) ensure that resources meet community needs, (3) aid the scientific community in keeping up with the revolution in computing, and (4) sustain the infrastructure for advanced computing.

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