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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Regulations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, Volume 1: Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22964.
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Page 366
Page 367
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Regulations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, Volume 1: Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22964.
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Page 367
Page 368
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Regulations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, Volume 1: Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22964.
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Page 368

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F-1 Occupational Safety and Health Administration Regulations The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is the agency in the U.S. Depart- ment of Labor that enforces safety and health regulations in private workplaces to ensure safe and healthy working conditions. The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act assigns to OSHA two principal functions: setting standards and conducting workplace inspections to ensure that employers are com- plying with the standards and providing a safe and healthful workplace. OSHA standards may require that employers adopt certain practices, means, methods, or processes reasonably necessary to protect workers on the job. It is the responsibility of employers to become famil- iar with standards applicable to their establishments, to eliminate hazardous conditions to the extent possible, and to comply with the standards. Compliance may include ensuring that employees have and use personal protective equipment, when required, for safety or health. Employees must comply with all rules and regulations that are applicable to their own actions and conduct. Even in areas where OSHA has not promulgated a standard addressing a specific hazard, employers are responsible for complying with the OSH Act’s “general duty” clause. The general duty clause of the OSH Act [Section 5(a)(1)] states that “each employer shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which is free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees.” States with OSHA-approved job safety and health programs must set standards that are at least as effective as the equivalent federal standard. Most of the state-plan states adopt standards iden- tical to the federal ones (two states, New York and Connecticut, have plans which cover only public sector employees). Federal OSHA Standards Standards fall into four major categories: • General Industry (29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910) • Construction (29 CFR 1926) • Maritime—shipyards, marine terminals, longshoring (29 CFR 1915–19) • Agriculture (29 CFR 1928) Each of these four categories of standards imposes requirements that are targeted to that industry, although in some cases they are identical across industries. Among the standards that impose similar requirements on all industry sectors are those for access to medical and A P P E N D I X F Regulations

F-2 Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design exposure records, personal protective equipment, and hazard communication. For more infor- mation on the regulations, please visit the OSHA website: www.osha.gov. ADA Regulations The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a landmark law that protects the civil rights of persons with disabilities. It prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government services, transportation, public accommodations, commercial facil- ities, and telecommunications. ADA covers facilities in the private sector (places of public accommodation and commercial facilities) and the public sector (state and local government facilities). Standards issued by the Department of Justice (DOJ) apply to all ADA facilities except transportation facilities, which are subject to standards maintained by the Department of Transportation (DOT). DOJ is in the process of adopting new ADA standards, and further information on this update is available on DOJ’s website at www.ada.gov. DOT has adopted new ADA standards which apply to bus stops, rail stations, airports, and other transportation facilities. Fire Regulations The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an international nonprofit organization, has a mission to reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life by providing and advocating consensus codes and standards, research, training, and education. The world’s leading advocate of fire prevention and an authoritative source on public safety, NFPA develops, publishes, and disseminates more than 300 consensus codes and standards intended to minimize the possibility and effects of fire and other risks. NFPA codes include some of the world’s most referenced and respected, including: • NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code™: Provides requirements to establish a reasonable level of fire safety and property protection in new and existing buildings. • NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Code: The safety benchmark for fuel gas installations. • NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code®: The world’s most widely used and accepted code for electrical installations. ADA STANDARDS wolloFotsdradnatSytilicaF Places of Public Accommodation and Commercial Facilities (private sector) DOJ’s ADA Standards (1991, reprinted 1993) These standards are contained in DOJ’s title III regulation (28 CFR Part 36) as Appendix A State and Local Government Facilities (except transportation facilities) DOJ’s ADA Standards or UFAS DOJ’s title II regulation (28 CFR Part 35) allows use of the original ADA standards (with some exceptions) or the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) Transportation Facilities DOT’s ADA Standards for Transportation Facilities (updated) These standards took effect November 29, 2006, as indicated in a notice published by DOT Source: http://www.access-board.gov/ADA-ABA/guide.htm

• NFPA 101®, Life Safety Code®: Establishes minimum requirements for new and existing buildings to protect building occupants from fire, smoke, and toxic fumes. Building Codes A building code, or building control, is a set of rules that specify the minimum acceptable level of safety for constructed objects such as buildings and non-building structures. The main pur- pose of the building code review board is to protect public health, safety, and general welfare as they relate to the construction and occupancy of buildings and structures. The International Code Council (ICC), a membership association dedicated to building safety and fire prevention, develops the codes used to construct residential and commercial buildings, including homes and schools. ICC is the developer of the International Codes™ (or I-Codes) used throughout the U.S., and is the organization that represents the state and local government code officials who enforce these building codes. The I-Codes are a complete set of comprehensive, coordinated, building safety and fire prevention codes. Building codes benefit public safety and support the industry’s need for one set of codes without regional limitations. Fifty states and the District of Columbia have adopted the I-Codes at the state or jurisdictional level. The ICC has developed and made available the following inventory of International Codes: • International Building Code® • International Energy Conservation Code® • International Code Council Electrical Code Administrative Provisions® • International Existing Building Code® • International Fire Code® • International Fuel Gas Code® • International Mechanical Code® • ICC Performance Code™ • International Plumbing Code® • International Private Sewage Disposal Code® • International Property Maintenance Code® • International Residential Code® • International Urban-Wildland Interface Code™ • International Zoning Code® All of these codes are comprehensive and coordinated with each other to provide the appro- priate package for adoption and use. There are instances when some local jurisdictions choose to develop their own building codes. Because having its own building code can be very expensive for a municipality, many have decided to adopt model codes instead. Regulations F-3

Next: Appendix G - Issues and Trends »
Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, Volume 1: Guidebook Get This Book
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 25, Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design comprises a guidebook, spreadsheet models, and a user’s guide in two volumes and a CD-ROM intended to provide guidance in planning and developing airport passenger terminals and to assist users in analyzing common issues related to airport terminal planning and design.

Volume 1 of ACRP Report 25 explores the passenger terminal planning process and provides, in a single reference document, the important criteria and requirements needed to help address emerging trends and develop potential solutions for airport passenger terminals. Volume 1 addresses the airside, terminal building, and landside components of the terminal complex.

Volume 2 of ACRP Report 25 consists of a CD-ROM containing 11 spreadsheet models, which include practical learning exercises and several airport-specific sample data sets to assist users in determining appropriate model inputs for their situations, and a user’s guide to assist the user in the correct use of each model. The models on the CD-ROM include such aspects of terminal planning as design hour determination, gate demand, check-in and passenger and baggage screening, which require complex analyses to support planning decisions. The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image.

View information about the TRB webinar on ACRP Report 25, Airport Passenger Terminal Planning and Design, which was held on Monday, April 26, 2010.

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