National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

Appendix B

Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992

TABLE 2F-2
Conventional and Nonconventional Pollutants

Bromide

Chlorine

Total residual color

Fecal coliform fluoride nitrate/nitrite

Nitrogen

Total organic oil and grease

Phosphorus, total radioactivity

Sulfate/sulfite surfactants

Aluminum, total

Barium, total

Boron, total

Cobalt, total

Iron, total

Magnesium, total

Molybdenum, total

Manganese, total

Tin, total

Titanium, total

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

TABLE 2F-3
Toxic Pollutants

Toxic Pollutants and Total Phenol
Antimony, Total Copper, Total Silver, Total
Arsenic, Total Lead, Total Thallium, Total
Beryllium, Total Mercury, Total Zinc, Total
Cadmium, Total Nickel, Total Cyanide, Total
Chromium, Total Selenium, Total Phenols, Total
GC/MS Fraction Volatiles Compounds
Acrolein Dichlorobromomethane 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Acrylonitrile 1,1-Dichloroethane Tetrachloroethylene
Benzene 1,2-Dichloroethane Toluene
Bromoform 1,1-Dichloroethylene 1,2-trans-Dichloroethylene
Carbon Tetrachloride 1,2-Dichloropropane 1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Chlorobenzene 1,3-Dichloropropylene 1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Chlorodibromomethane Ethylbenzene Trichloroethylene
Chloroethane Methyl bromide Vinyl chloride
2-Chloroethylvinyl ether Methyl chloride
Chloroform Methylene chloride
Acid Compounds
2-Chlorophenol 2,4-Dinitrophenol Pentachlorophenol
2,4-Dichlorophenol 2-Nitrophenol Phenol
2,4-Dimethylphenol 4-Nitrophenol 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
4,6-Dinitro-O-Cresol p-Chloro-m-Cresol 2-Methyl-4,6-Dinitrophenol
Base/Neutral
Acenaphthene 2-Chloronaphthalene Fluorene
Acenaphthylene 4-Chlorophenyl phenyl ether Fluroranthene
Anthracene Chrysene Hexachlorobenzene
Benzidine Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene Hexachlorobutadiene
Benzo[a]anthracene 1,2-Dichlorobenzene Hexachloroethane
Benzo[a]pyrene 1,3-Dichlorobenzene lndeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene
3,4-Benzofluoranthene 1,4-Dichlorobenzene Isophorone
Benzo[ghi]perylene 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine Napthalene
Benzo[k]fluoranthene Diethyl phthalate Nitrobenzene
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane Dimethyl phthalate N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether Di-N-butyl phthalate N-Nitrosodi-N-Propylamine
Bis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether 2,4-Dinitrotoluene N-Nitrosodiphenylamine
Bis(2-ethylyhexyl)phthalate 2,6-Dinitrotoluene Phenanthrene
4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether Di-N-octyphthalate Pyrene
Butylbenzyl phthalate 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine (as Azobenzene) 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
Pesticides
Aldrin Dieldrin PCB-1254
Alpha-BHC Alpha-Endosulfan PCB-1221
Beta-BHC Beta-Endosulfan PCB-1232
Gamma-BHC Endosulfan sulfate PCB-1248
Delta-BHC Endrin PCB-1260
Chlordane Endrin aldehyde PCB-1016
4,4’-DDT Heptachlor Toxaphene
4,4’-DDE Heptachlor epoxide
4,4’-DDD PCB-1242
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

TABLE 2F-4
Hazardous Substances

Toxic Pollutant
Asbestos
Hazardous Substances
Acetaldehyde Dinitrobenzene Napthenic acid
Allyl alcohol Diquat Nitrotoluene
Allyl chloride Disulfoton Parathion
Amyl acetate Diuron Phenolsulfonate
Aniline Epichlorohydrin Phosgene
Benzonitrile Ethion Propargite
Benzyl chloride Ethylene diamine Propylene oxide
Butyl acetate Ethylene dibromide Pyrethrins
Butylamine Formaldehyde Quinoline
Carbaryl Furfural Resorcinol
Carbofuran Guthion Strontium
Carbon disulfide Isoprene Strychnine
Chlorpyrifos Isopropanolamine Styrene
Coumaphos Kelthane Tetrachlorodiphenyl ethane
Cresol Kepone 2,4,5-TP [2-(2,4,5-
Crotonaldehyde Malathion Trichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid]
Cyclohexane Mercaptodimethur Trichlorofan
2,4-D (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) Methoxychlor 2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid
Diazinon Methyl mercaptan Triethylamine
Dicamba Methyl methacrylate Trimethylamine
Dichlobenil Methyl parathion Uranium
Dichlone Mevinphos Vanadium
2,2-Dichloropropionic acid Mexacarbate Vinyl acetate
Dichlorvos Monoethyl amine Xylene
Diethyl amine Monomethyl amine Xylenol
Dimethyl amine Naled Zirconium
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 96
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Industrial stormwater is derived from precipitation and/or runoff that comes in contact with industrial manufacturing, processing, storage, or material overburden and then runs offsite and enters drainage systems or receiving waters. In 1987, Congress significantly expanded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program through amendments to the Clean Water Act to include industrial stormwater runoff conveyed through outfalls directly to receiving waters or indirectly through municipal separate storm sewer systems.

The added regulation of stormwater in the NPDES program has been challenging. Stormwater is produced throughout a developed landscape, and its production and delivery are episodic. In 2009, the National Research Council released a comprehensive report on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Stormwater Program that covered all sectors of the program. This study builds on that report, with a focus on industrial stormwater monitoring and management.

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