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Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges (2019)

Chapter: Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
EPA 2015 Alaska 2015 California 2014 Connecticut 2016 Maryland 2014
Benchmark (BM) monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors. Many facilities identify additional site-specific monitoring parameters. BM monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors.
Frequency: Quarterly. Frequency: Quarterly. Frequency: Twice every 6 months. Compliance Group participants monitor once every 6 months. Frequency: Once every 6 months. Frequency: Quarterly.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background.
No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background.
No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
BM Monitoring Reduction: After four consecutive results with no numeric action level exceedances, reduce to once every 6 months (once per year for Compliance Group). BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM
Natural background.
Run-on entering from off site. No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background.
No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): N/A. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): A coal loading facility (Sector AD). Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): Preproduction plastics facilities which manufacture, handle, or transport plastics including resin pellets and color powder material. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): Small-scale composting facilities; public works and Department of Transportation garages; salt storage facilities. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): School bus maintenance facilities; Department of Public Works and highway maintenance facilities, hydrodemolition, and salt terminals.
Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: Total suspended solids (TSS), oil and grease, and pH. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: Chemical oxygen demand (COD), TSS, oil and grease, pH, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, nitrate, copper, lead, zinc. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None.
Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge. Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge. Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge, with local municipal government approval. Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge. Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
EPA 2015 Minnesota 2015 Rhode Island 2013 Washington 2015 West Virginia 2014 Wisconsin 2017
BM monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for all sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors. BM monitoring for some sectors. Monitoring for some sectors. No benchmarks.
Frequency: Quarterly. Frequency: Quarterly. Frequency: Once every 6 months. Frequency: Quarterly. Frequency: Once per 6-month period (collected at least 3 months apart). Frequency: Annual.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background.
No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background.
Run-on entering from off site. Infiltration and ponding waiver.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM.
Natural background. No further pollutant reductions are technologically available and economically practicable and achievable, reduce to once per year.
BM Monitoring Waiver: Eight consecutive results below BM. BM Monitoring Waiver: Average four consecutive results below BM. BM Monitoring Waiver: Facility inactive or remote. Contamination off site and not associated with facility.
Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): N/A. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): None. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): None. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): Puget Sound sediment cleanup sites. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): Motorsports racing complexes; shale mining only where the shale mined is not used in manufacturing; salt storage—limited to under 50,000 tons; transloading facilities. Additional Sectors Covered (not in EPA MSGP): None.
Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: TSS. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: Turbidity, oil sheen, pH, copper, and zinc. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None. Mandatory Baseline Monitoring for All Sectors: None.
Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge. Infiltration: Specific requirements must be met where used for a BM monitoring waiver. Prohibits new/expanded infiltration at five subsectors based on risk to groundwater. Infiltration: Permittees may consider infiltration to minimize pollutants in stormwater discharge. Infiltration: Does not cover facilities who infiltrate all their stormwater. Infiltration: All facilities must have a groundwater protection plan. Stormwater infiltration authorized unless considered significant sources of pollutants. Infiltration: Stormwater infiltration excluded from permit coverage.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×

SOURCES

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. 2015. Multi-sector general permit for storm water discharges associated with industrial stormwater (MSGP). General Permit No. AKR060000.

Ashton, W., Alaska DEC, personal communication, 2018.

Bertolacini, J., Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, personal communication, 2018.

Burch, P., West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, personal communication, 2018.

California Water Boards. 2018. Preproduction plastics debris program. California Water Code, Division 7, Chapter 5.2, Section 13367.

Chatterton, M., Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, personal communication, 2018.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. 2016. General permit or the discharge of stormwater associated with industrial activity. DEEP-WPED-GP-014.

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). 2015. United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit for stormwater discharges associated with industrial activity (MSGP). Available at https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-10/documents/msgp2015_finalpermit.pdf (accessed November 1, 2018).

Gearheart, G., California State Water Resources Control Board, personal communication, 2018.

Hlavinka, P., Maryland Department of the Environment, personal communication, 2018.

Maryland Department of the Environment. General permit for discharges from stormwater associated with industrial activities. Discharge permit no. 12-SW, NPDES permit no. MDR0000.

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. 2015. National Pollutant Elimination System (NPDES)/State Disposal System (SDS) general permit MNR050000 for industrial stormwater multi-sector (ISW). Authorization to discharge stormwater associated with industrial activity under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)/State Disposal System (SDS) permit program. Available at https://www.pca.state.mn.us/sites/default/files/wq-strm3-67a.pdf (accessed November 14, 2018).

Porter, T., Washington Department of Ecology, personal communication, 2018.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. 2013. Multi-sector general permit Rhode Island pollutant discharge elimination system storm water discharge associated with industrial activity (excluding construction activity). RIR500000.

State of Washington Department of Ecology. 2014. Industrial stormwater general permit: A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and state waste discharge general permit for stormwater discharges associated with industrial activities.

State of West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection. 2014. General National Pollution Discharge Elimination System water pollution control permit. Permit no. WV0116025.

Stone, C., Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, personal communication, 2018.

Walddrip, L., California State Water Resources Control Board, personal communication, 2018.

Wenzel, M., Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, personal communication, 2018.

Wisconsin Administrative Code NR [Natural Resources] 2.16.002. Stormwater discharge permits: Definitions.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: State Industrial Stormwater Permit Benchmark Monitoring Comparison." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Improving the EPA Multi-Sector General Permit for Industrial Stormwater Discharges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25355.
×
Page 92
Next: Appendix B: Lists of Pollutants from Which Industries Self-Identified the Need for Monitoring in the 1992 Group Applications, Adapted from EPA Form 2F, 1992 »
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Industrial stormwater is derived from precipitation and/or runoff that comes in contact with industrial manufacturing, processing, storage, or material overburden and then runs offsite and enters drainage systems or receiving waters. In 1987, Congress significantly expanded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program through amendments to the Clean Water Act to include industrial stormwater runoff conveyed through outfalls directly to receiving waters or indirectly through municipal separate storm sewer systems.

The added regulation of stormwater in the NPDES program has been challenging. Stormwater is produced throughout a developed landscape, and its production and delivery are episodic. In 2009, the National Research Council released a comprehensive report on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Stormwater Program that covered all sectors of the program. This study builds on that report, with a focus on industrial stormwater monitoring and management.

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