National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix E Dietary Intake Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Total Diet Study, 1991-1997
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

F
Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990

TABLE F-1 Mean and Percentiles for Intake of Vitamin A (μg/ REa/day) from Food, Nova Scotia and Québec, Canada (1990)

Sex/Age Categoryb

Number of Respondents

Mean

Percentile

5th

M 19–30 y

536

1,518

380

Standard error

 

37

M 31–50 y

724

1,281

417

Standard error

 

16

M 51–70 y

663

1,479

481

Standard error

 

43

M 71–74 y

149

2,093

464

Standard error

 

50

F 19–30 y

548

1,129

417

Standard error

 

17

F 31–50 y

826

1,137

401

Standard error

 

21

F 51–70 y

657

1,245

426

Standard error

 

24

F 71–74 y

148

1,298

431

Standard error

 

29

a RE = retinol equivalents. 1 RE = 6 μg β-carotene and 12 mg α-carotene or β-cryptoxanthin.

b M = male, F = female.

SOURCE: Nova Scotia Heart Health Program. 1993. Report of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey. Nova Scotia Department of Health, Health and Welfare Canada; Santé Québec. 1995. Les Québécoises et les Québécois Mangent-Ils Mieux? Rapport de l’Enquête Québécoise sur la Nutrition, 1990. Montréal: Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Gouvernement du Québec.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

10th

25th

50th

75th

90th

95th

99th

484

647

874

1,277

1,744

2,145

3,892

27

16

27

48

76

145

1,051

495

710

951

1,253

1,581

1,802

2,485

24

22

30

37

58

98

228

572

744

994

134

1,891

2,082

2,812

30

28

43

88

93

40

275

550

805

1,124

1,463

1,855

2,317

3,769

53

79

42

90

198

215

2,944

499

597

717

885

1,039

1,121

1,443

12

11

11

16

25

25

94

474

598

747

1,005

1,264

1,420

1,802

16

10

18

22

38

75

140

500

609

805

1,128

1,443

1,648

1,992

23

16

33

41

72

62

111

456

540

756

1,195

1,637

1,838

2,315

19

44

62

100

115

134

417

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

TABLE F-2 Mean and Percentiles for Intake of Iron (mg/day) from Food, Nova Scotia and Québec, Canada (1990)

Sex/Age Categorya

Number of Respondents

Mean

Percentile

5th

M 19–30 y

536

17.9

10.3

Standard error

 

0.4

M 31–50 y

724

16.9

9.0

Standard error

 

0.4

M 51–70 y

663

15.1

8.2

Standard error

 

0.4

M 71–74 y

149

15.1

9.1

Standard error

 

0.8

F 19–30 y

548

11.8

6.2

Standard error

 

0.2

F 31–50 y

826

11.7

7.2

Standard error

 

0.2

F 51–70 y

657

11

7.0

Standard error

 

0.3

F 71–74 y

148

11

6.3

Standard error

 

0.3

a M = male, F = female.

SOURCE: Nova Scotia Heart Health Program. 1993. Report of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey. Nova Scotia Department of Health, Health and Welfare Canada; Santé Québec. 1995. Les Québécoises et les Québécois Mangent-Ils Mieux? Rapport de l’Enquête Québécoise sur la Nutrition, 1990. Montréal: Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Gouvernement du Québec.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

10th

25th

50th

75th

90th

95th

99th

11.2

13.7

16.1

19.2

22.4

23.9

31.6

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.4

0.3

1.0

2.2

10.2

12.6

15.7

18.7

21.9

24.7

31.6

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.6

1.2

2.2

9.0

11.2

14.5

17.8

20.4

22.2

29.5

0.5

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.7

0.8

2.4

10.0

11.4

13.6

16.8

20.4

21.6

31.6

0.3

0.4

0.7

1.0

1.1

2.6

5.2

7.1

8.6

10.9

13.4

15.9

17.5

20.8

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.9

8.2

9.6

10.8

12.1

13.7

14.8

17.8

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.4

0.5

7.8

9.0

10.5

11.8

13.3

14.0

17.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.2

1.1

6.6

8.0

9.7

11.9

13.7

17.2

24.9

0.4

0.3

0.4

0.4

1.4

3.2

4.6

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

TABLE F-3 Mean and Percentiles for Intake of Zinc (mg/day) from Food, Nova Scotia and Québec, Canada (1990)

Sex/Age Categorya

Number of Respondents

Mean

Percentile

5th

M 19–30 y

536

15.9

11.2

Standard error

 

0.3

M 31–50 y

724

16.6

8.3

Standard error

 

0.3

M 51–70 y

663

12.6

7.4

Standard error

 

0.4

M 71–74 y

149

13.2

7.0

Standard error

 

0.6

F 19–30 y

548

9.9

5.9

Standard error

 

0.2

F 31–50 y

826

9.7

6.2

Standard error

 

0.2

F 51–70 y

657

8.8

4.0

Standard error

 

0.2

F 71–74 y

148

9.4

3.9

Standard error

 

0.3

a M = male, F = female.

SOURCE: Nova Scotia Heart Health Program. 1993. Report of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey. Nova Scotia Department of Health, Health and Welfare Canada; Santé Québec. 1995. Les Québécoises et les Québécois Mangent-Ils Mieux? Rapport de l’Enquête Québécoise sur la Nutrition, 1990. Montréal: Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Gouvernement du Québec.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×

10th

25th

50th

75th

90th

95th

99th

12.0

13.0

14.0

14.9

15.8

16.5

20.2

0.1

0.1

0.08

0.1

0.1

0.4

1.4

9.4

11.2

13.1

14.9

16.6

18.2

21.9

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.6

1.0

8.5

9.7

11.3

13.2

15.8

18.0

20.1

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.3

0.7

0.8

0.6

8.0

8.9

11.0

13.3

15.1

16.2

21.9

0.4

0.3

0.5

0.5

0.7

1.4

2.5

6.6

7.6

8.8

10.1

11.3

12.1

14.1

0.1

0.09

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.8

6.7

7.5

8.5

9.7

10.8

11.6

13.9

0.09

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.6

5.8

6.8

8.2

9.3

10.6

11.5

13.2

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.4

1.1

4.2

6.2

7.4

9.0

12.0

13.0

20.7

0.5

0.4

0.2

0.8

0.8

2.8

4.1

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 674
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 675
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 676
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 677
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 678
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Canadian Dietary Intake Data, 1990." Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10026.
×
Page 679
Next: Appendix G Biochemical Indicators for Iron, Vitamin A, and Iodine from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 1988-1994 »
Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc Get This Book
×

This volume is the newest release in the authoritative series issued by the National Academy of Sciences on dietary reference intakes (DRIs). This series provides recommended intakes, such as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs), for use in planning nutritionally adequate diets for individuals based on age and gender. In addition, a new reference intake, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL), has also been established to assist an individual in knowing how much is "too much" of a nutrient.

Based on the Institute of Medicine's review of the scientific literature regarding dietary micronutrients, recommendations have been formulated regarding vitamins A and K, iron, iodine, chromium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, zinc, and other potentially beneficial trace elements such as boron to determine the roles, if any, they play in health. The book also:

  • Reviews selected components of food that may influence the bioavailability of these compounds.
  • Develops estimates of dietary intake of these compounds that are compatible with good nutrition throughout the life span and that may decrease risk of chronic disease where data indicate they play a role.
  • Determines Tolerable Upper Intake levels for each nutrient reviewed where adequate scientific data are available in specific population subgroups.
  • Identifies research needed to improve knowledge of the role of these micronutrients in human health.

This book will be important to professionals in nutrition research and education.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!