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Status of Pollinators in North America (2007)

Chapter: I Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances

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Suggested Citation:"I Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
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I
Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances

Family

Genus

Species

Annual Variability

Years

Reference

Apidae

Apis

1

5.04

10

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Apidae

Centris

1

1.77

4

Roubik, 1989; unpublished data

Apidae

Centris

1

4.74

17

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Apidae

Euglossini

6

1.77

2

Pearson and Dressler, 1985

Apidae

Euglossini

32

1.36

20

Roubik, 2001

Apidae

Meliponini

10

4.06

17

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Colletidae

Ptiloglossa

1

2.45

17

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Halictidae

Megalopta

2

2.15

17

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Halictidae

Rhinetula

1

3.45

17

Roubik and Wolda, 2001

Megachilidae

Megachile

3

2.07

3

Frankie et al., 1998

Megachilidae

Osmia

1

2.46

2-3

Frankie et al., 1998

NOTE: Annual variability in bee abundance was determined from short- and long-term censuses in two tropical regions (Peru and Panama) and one temperate region (California).

SOURCE: Adapted from Roubik, 2001.

Suggested Citation:"I Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×

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Suggested Citation:"I Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 307
Suggested Citation:"I Annual Bee Variability of Bee Abundances." National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11761.
×
Page 308
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Pollinators--insects, birds, bats, and other animals that carry pollen from the male to the female parts of flowers for plant reproduction--are an essential part of natural and agricultural ecosystems throughout North America. For example, most fruit, vegetable, and seed crops and some crops that provide fiber, drugs, and fuel depend on animals for pollination.

This report provides evidence for the decline of some pollinator species in North America, including America's most important managed pollinator, the honey bee, as well as some butterflies, bats, and hummingbirds. For most managed and wild pollinator species, however, population trends have not been assessed because populations have not been monitored over time. In addition, for wild species with demonstrated declines, it is often difficult to determine the causes or consequences of their decline. This report outlines priorities for research and monitoring that are needed to improve information on the status of pollinators and establishes a framework for conservation and restoration of pollinator species and communities.

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