National Academies Press: OpenBook

Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report (2018)

Chapter: Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table

« Previous: Appendix C State of the Practice Interviews: Protocols for Interviews and Questionnaire
Page 373
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 373
Page 374
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 374
Page 375
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 375
Page 376
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 376
Page 377
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 377
Page 378
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 378
Page 379
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 379
Page 380
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 380
Page 381
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 381
Page 382
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 382
Page 383
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 383
Page 384
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 384
Page 385
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 385
Page 386
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 386
Page 387
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 387
Page 388
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 388
Page 389
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 389
Page 390
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 390
Page 391
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 391
Page 392
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 392
Page 393
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 393
Page 394
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 394
Page 395
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 395
Page 396
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 396
Page 397
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 397
Page 398
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 398
Page 399
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 399
Page 400
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 400
Page 401
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 401
Page 402
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 402
Page 403
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Content Review of Toll Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 403

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix D ‐ 1  Appendix D Content Review of Toll‐Related Travel Surveys: Brief Findings and Summary Table

Appendix D ‐ 2  Inventory and Content Review Assessment of Toll‐Related Travel Surveys A content review analysis of toll‐related travel surveys was undertaken as part of the research and  development of the tool, “Designing and Implementing Surveys to Assess Attitudes and Travel Behavior for EJ  Analyses and to Monitor Implementation.” Table 1 presents a summary of key findings from the individual toll‐ related travel surveys and explores the topics of transponder usage, opinions or attitudes toward tolling, and  actual or predicted use of toll facilities.    The findings describe how toll plans and pricing initiatives affect the attitudes of respondents about the  fairness of toll projects and/or the presumed or actual travel behavior of respondents. In particular, Table 1 is  intended as a resource for comparing the reported similarities and differences by income and race factors.  Toward the objective of carrying out an environmental justice assessment, the table reveals troubling gaps in  the current practice in the reporting of race and income patterns in comparison to the general populations on  non‐EJ populations. For such assessments to occur, toll survey sampling plans must be sufficiently robust to  capture the views of low‐income and minority segments. The toll survey, the analysis plan and report findings  must be designed to comprehensively assess how the benefits and burdens of these initiatives may be  perceived and borne by low‐income and minority populations in comparison to the broader general population  (i.e., the non‐EJ populations).    In compiling the reports for the content review analysis, the Research Team also examined a technical  memorandum published for the San Francisco region’s Metropolitan Transportation Commission (HDR  Engineering, 2013) that summarized survey findings related to how people of different income, race, and  ethnicity groups responded to tolling projects. A summary of those tables is also provided as a reference table  below (see Appendix items, Exhibit A‐1 through A‐4). 

Appendix D ‐ 3  Table 1.  Summary of Findings from Toll‐Related Travel Surveys Reviewed   Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  I‐110 and   I‐10 Corridor   License Plate and  Mailback Survey  (2009) 1 • Whites were the least likely to agree that express bus services should be expanded on the I‐10/I‐110. • Agreement with the statement “I would consider using express bus service if it had pick‐ups at local park‐and‐ride lots and connected to Union Station” declined as income increased, with the lowest‐income group most likely to agree. • Hispanics and Spanish speakers were more likely to agree with the statement “it is very important to ensure carpool lanes continue to run smoothly to motivate people to rideshare.” • White non‐Hispanic persons were more likely (47%) to use the general purpose lane on than the high‐occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes (31%) on the I‐110 corridor. • Hispanics/Latinos were more likely to use the HOV lanes than general purpose lanes on both the I‐10 (45% compared to 38%) and the I‐110 (35% compared to 18%). • African Americans were more likely to use the general purpose lane than HOV lanes on I‐10 (7% compared to 4%); the difference was less on the I‐110 corridor, 12% used the general purpose lanes and 13% used the HOV lanes. • Asian/Pacific Islanders were more likely to use the general purpose lanes than the HOV lanes on the I‐10 (24% compared to 28%); the difference was less on the I‐110 corridor, 21% used the general purpose lanes and 20% used the HOV lanes. • Persons with incomes under $20,000 reported that the purpose of trip was work (64%) less often than persons with incomes over $100,000 (93%). • The perception that HOV lanes are underutilized increases with income.  Persons with incomes over $100,000 at 22% compared to persons with incomes less than $20,000 at 8% believe HOV lanes are underutilized during peak periods. • Agreement with the statement “express bus service should be expanded on the I‐10/I‐110 corridor” declines as income increases.

Appendix D ‐ 4  Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  I‐10 and I‐110  Pre‐ Implementation  License Plate  Study (2012) 2  • This pre‐high‐occupancy toll (HOT) lane implementation survey captures information on respondent’s demographics, but does not systematically show how attitudes/opinions, transponder ownership, and actual or predicted use of facility vary by income or race. Some statements are made. • The proportion of motorists using the I‐10 freeway for work purposes increases with income. • General purpose lane users, workers, and peak period motorists report more negative ratings (always bad or more often bad) to the question “during your typical commute, the flow of traffic on the I‐10 is..?” • Persons with higher incomes and longer trips report negative ratings (always bad or more often bad) to the question “during your typical commute, the flow of traffic on the I‐10 is..?” • This survey compares the responses from a 2011 study.  In 2011, 36% of respondents agreed with the statement “The ExpressLanes are accessible regardless of income, due to discount on transponder;” in 2012 this number increased to 44%. • 57% of respondents agree with the statement “The ExpressLanes place an unfair burden on carpoolers because they must register and buy a transponder in order to continue using the lanes, and this will reduce carpooling.” • Of the 700 respondents, 21% had a total household income less than $34,999, 12% had a total household income between $35,000 and $49,999, and 46% had a total household income greater than $75,000. • Regarding awareness of the ExpressLanes, familiarity increases with income. • Persons with incomes greater than $75,000 are less likely to agree with the statement “ExpressLanes only benefit the rich” than are persons with incomes below $50,000.

Appendix D ‐ 5  Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  Equity Plan  Survey (2013) 3 Survey targeted “Equity Plan Account” holders (now known as Low‐Income Assistance Plan). • Most respondents (85%) identified as having a household income less than $34,999. • Prior to the implementation of the ExpressLanes, 11.6% of respondents did not use the carpool or HOV lane. • Prior to the implementation of the ExpressLanes, 52.9% of respondents used the carpool or HOV lanes between one and five times a week. • Of the 580 responses collected, 34 of the respondents stated that prior to the implementation of ExpressLanes they used the carpool or HOV lane between one and five times a month. • Since the carpool or HOV lane was converted to an ExpressLane, usage of the facility increased by 6.9 percentage points to 59.8% of respondents utilizing the lane between one and five times a week. • The number of respondents using the carpool or HOV lane 6 to 10 times a week prior to implementation of the ExpressLanes was 16.9% compared to 21.2% of respondents post‐implementation of the ExpressLanes. • A large portion, 74.3% of respondents, do not use transit on the ExpressLanes. • 82.4% of respondents indicated that the Equity Plan toll credit of $25 was very important in making the decision to get a FasTrak. • Respondents signed up for the Equity Plan either at METRO offices (74.6%) or through the mail (23.8%), and a smaller percentage (1.6%) of respondents signed up at METRO mobile van stations. • The three most frequently used methods to prove eligibility for the Equity Plan were a copy of respondents tax return (29.1%), a copy of respondents paycheck stub (25.7%) and MediCal (California’s Medicaid health care program) (15.2%). • Respondents were asked to list the challenges or concerns they encountered when signing up for the Equity Plan. Most respondents (80.8%) stated that they did not encounter any challenges or have any concerns.  A very small percentage of respondents (0.7%) cited affordability, maintenance fees, and customer services as challenges.  The most frequently cited challenge was the eligibility process at 3.7%. • Respondents reported at 69.8% that time savings was the greatest benefit of the ExpressLanes, the second most common benefit was access to lanes as a solo driver (17.1%), followed by convenience (6.0%).

Appendix D ‐ 6  Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  I‐10 and   I‐110 Post‐ Implementation  License Plate  Study (2014) 4  • Focus of study is to compare responses of pre‐ and post‐implementation surveys and differences in HOV to non‐HOV lane users. Survey does collect information on race / ethnicity, income, and gender categories; it does not report findings broken out by race and/or income demographics in the comparison. • In 2012, 59% of respondents agreed with the statement “The ExpressLanes places an unfair burden on carpoolers” compared to 56% of respondents that agreed in 2014. • For I‐10, agreement with two of the negative statements increased between 2012 and 2014, e.g., “The ExpressLanes are double taxation” (from 66% in 2012 to 70% in 2014) and “The ExpressLanes only benefit the rich” (from 53% in 2012 to 62% in 2014). Agreement with one of the negative statements, “The ExpressLanes place an unfair burden on carpoolers,” decreased from 57% in 2012 to 52% in 2014. • For I‐110, agreement with two of the negative statements increased between 2012 and 2014, e.g., “The ExpressLanes are double taxation” (from 65% in 2012 to 70% in 2014) and “The ExpressLanes only benefit the rich” (from 50% in 2012 to 57% in 2014). Agreement with one of the negative statements, “The ExpressLanes place an unfair burden on carpoolers,” increased from 59% in 2012 to 61% in 2014. • For I‐10, agreement with all positive statements decreased from 2012 to 2014, e.g., “The ExpressLanes help reduce taxes and provide new revenue to transportation improvements” (from 55% in 2012 to 42% in 2014) and “The ExpressLanes are accessible regardless of income, due to discount on transponder” (from 44% in 2012 to 28% in 2014). • For I‐110, agreement with all positive statements decreased from 2012 to 2014, e.g., “The ExpressLanes help reduce taxes and provide new revenue to transportation improvements” (from 49% in 2012 to 34% in 2014) and “The ExpressLanes are accessible regardless of income, due to discount on transponder” (from 41% in 2012 to 28% in 2014). • For I‐10, non‐HOV lane users agreed with negative statements about ExpressLanes more than HOV lane users, e.g., “Express Lanes place an unfair burden on carpoolers” (42% HOV lane users and 61% non‐HOV lane users agreed) and “ExpressLanes only benefit the rich” (54% HOV lane users and 68% non‐HOV lane users agreed). • For I‐110, non‐HOV lane users agreed with negative statements about ExpressLanes more than HOV lane users, e.g., “Express Lanes place an unfair burden on carpoolers” (48% HOV lane users and 74% non‐HOV lane users agreed) and “ExpressLanes only benefit the rich” (49% HOV lane users and 65% non‐HOV lane users agreed). • For I‐10, HOV lane users agreed with positive statements about ExpressLanes more than non‐HOV lane users, e.g., “The ExpressLanes benefit all motorist by shifting traffic” (64% of HOV lane users and 35% of non‐HOV lane users agreed), “The ExpressLanes are fair for everyone because carpoolers can still use the ExpressLanes for free” (71% HOV lane users and 44% of non‐ HOV lane users agreed), and “ExpressLanes are good when I need to get somewhere fast” (81% of HOV users and 45% of non‐HOV users agreed). • For I‐110, HOV lane users agreed with positive statements about ExpressLanes more than non‐HOV lane users, e.g., “The ExpressLanes benefit all motorist by shifting traffic” (45% of HOV lane users and 35% of non‐HOV lane users agreed), “The ExpressLanes are fair for everyone because carpoolers can still use the ExpressLanes for free” (60% HOV lane users and 36% of non‐ HOV lane users agreed), and “ExpressLanes are good when I need to get somewhere fast” (63% of HOV users and 43% of non‐HOV users agreed).

   Appendix D ‐ 7  Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  Low‐Income Field  Surveys (2015) 5  Survey targeted low‐income travelers, mostly non‐users of Metro ExpressLanes and FasTrak, but no users of these programs were excluded.  Close focus on race/ethnicity of low‐income travelers.   • Of those that drive alone, 19.7% are African American, 10.9% are White, 21.2% are Asian, and 48.2% are Hispanic.   • Of the 16.4% of respondents that carpool, 24.7% are African American, 16.4% are White, 26.0% are Asian, and 32.9% are Hispanic.   • Of the 7.9% of respondents that ride the bus, 42.9% are African Americans making them the largest group to commute via transit,  2.86% are White making them the smallest group to commute via transit, 14.3% are Asian, and 40.0% are Hispanic.  • Low‐income commuters prefer using their own vehicle.  When asked “what is preventing you from using a commute alternative  such as ridesharing or transit,” Asians (33. 3%), African Americans (30.3%), and Latinos (43.0%) most commonly stated they  preferred to use their own car.   • When asked “what is preventing you from using a commute alternative such as ridesharing or transit,” Whites most commonly  stated (33.3%) that transit service is not adequate; “working late or irregular work hours” was cited by Hispanics (13.0%), African  Americans, (6.2%), Asians (17.2%), and Whites (14.6%).   • When asked “what is preventing you from using a commute alternative such as ridesharing or transit,” the response “difficult to find  others to rideshare” was cited by Hispanics (7.35%), African Americans (16.2%), Asians (19.4%), and Whites (12.5%).   • African American, White, and Hispanic respondents typically travel less than 20 miles to work, and Asians typically travel 20 to 45  miles to work.  Nearly one in ten White respondents travel more than 60 miles to work.   • Six out of ten low‐income commuters leave work after 5:00 p.m.  • Of those leaving work between 3:00 p.m. ‐ 3:59 p.m., 16.7% are African American, 12.2% are White, 10.2% are Asian, and 14.7% are  Hispanic.  Asians are the least likely to leave work at earlier off‐peak times and African Americans are the most likely to leave work  at earlier off‐peak times.   • Of those leaving work at 7:00 p.m. or later, 15.7% are African American, 14.3% are White, 25.0% are Asian, and 14.7% are Hispanic.   Asians are the most likely to leave work at later off‐peak times and Whites are the least likely to leave work at later off‐peak times.   • When asked about transponder ownership, 85% of low‐income travelers reported that they do not own a FasTrak transponder.    • African Americans at 92.2% are the least likely to own a transponder, followed by Hispanics at 86.4%, Whites at 77.6%, and Asians at  77.1%.   • When asked about reasons why they do not own a transponder, the most common response was “FasTrak is too expensive.”  36.2%  of African Americans, 44.7% of Whites, 59.5% of Asians, and 48% of Hispanics reported this response.   • When asked about reasons why they do not own a transponder, 27.7% of African Americans, 21.0% of Whites, 29.7% of Asians, and  18.1% of Hispanics reported the statement “I can’t afford to pay for the tolls.”    

   Appendix D ‐ 8  Region  Type of Study  Findings • When asked about reasons why they do not own a transponder, 12.8% of African Americans, 15.8% of Whites, 8.1% of Asians, and  9.9% of Hispanics reported the statement “There are no toll lanes on my commute to and from work.”   California –  Los  Angeles  Region  I‐110 Corridor  (2008) 6  • More people in the environmental justice (EJ) population (52%) than the general population (46%) believe it is better to test some  type of HOT lane.  • EJ population was more enthusiastic (4.2 on Likert scale) than the general population (3.9 on Likert scale) about using toll revenues  from the HOT lanes to support travel improvement such as bus services on the corridor.   • EJ population was more likely to disagree (42%) than the general population (26%) that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes would  encourage transit use.   • EJ population was more likely to disagree (24%) than the general population (17%) with the statement that HOT lanes benefit all  travelers because toll revenue is used to improve transit which provides a low cost travel alternative for everyone.  • EJ population was more likely to disagree with the statement “Because it is free for carpools with three or more passengers, HOT  lanes are fair for everyone” (28%) compared to the general population (18%).   • Majority of the EJ population (56%) agreed that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes would increase congestion on nearby streets  compared to 48% of the general population that agreed.   • Majority of the EJ population (54%) agreed that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes would reduce carpooling because current  carpoolers can drive alone in the HOT lane and pay a toll compared to 42% of the general population that agreed.   • Both EJ population (68%) and general population (66%) tended to agree that HOT lanes are unfair because lower‐income people  may not be able to afford them.  California –  Los  Angeles  Region  Los Angeles  County(2008) 7  • EJ population (66%) was more likely to agree than the general population (59%) that HOT lanes are unfair because lower‐income  people may not be able to afford them.  • General population (29%) was more likely to disagree than the EJ population (24%) that changing the carpool lanes to HOT lanes will  encourage more people to use transit.   • General population was more likely to disagree (25%) than the EJ population (21%) with the statement “Because it is free for  carpools with three or more passengers, HOT lanes are fair for everyone.”   • General population disagreed more (24%) than the EJ population (19%) that HOT lanes benefit all travelers because the toll revenue  is used to improve transit which provides a low cost travel alternative for everyone.  • EJ population (64%) was more likely to agree than the general population (57%) that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes will  increase congestion on surface streets around the freeway. 

Appendix D ‐ 9  Region  Type of Study  Findings California –  Los  Angeles  Region  San Gabriel  Valley – LA  County (2008) 8 • EJ population (46%) was more likely than general population (25%) to disagree with the statement “even if I don’t want to pay to use the HOT lanes on a regular basis, it is good to have it as an option when I need to get someplace fast.” • While less than a majority, general population was more likely to agree (45%) than EJ population (40%) that it is better to test some type of HOT lanes. • General population (74%) was more likely to agree than the EJ population (62%) that using the funds from the HOT lanes for additional public transit is a good idea. • EJ population (38%) was more likely to disagree than the general population with the statement “because it is free for carpools with three of more passengers, HOT lanes are fair for everyone.” • EJ population (34%) was more likely to disagree than the general population (24%) that HOT lanes benefit all travelers because toll revenue is used to improve transit which provides a low cost travel alternative for everyone. • EJ population (68%) was more likely to agree than general populations (52%) that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes will increase congestion on surface streets. • More of the EJ population (58%) than the general population (50%) agreed that changing carpool lanes to HOT lanes would reduce carpooling because current carpoolers can drive alone in the HOT lane and pay a toll. • EJ population (72%) was more likely to agree than the general population (66%) that HOT lanes are unfair because lower‐income people may not be able to afford to use them. Colorado –  Denver  Region  US‐36 Stated  Preference  Survey (2010) 9 • Survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity. • The survey categorizes respondents into peak‐work, peak non‐work, off‐peak work, and off‐peak non‐work segments each being defined by the time of day and the purpose of the trip, respectively.  The survey found that the peak‐work segment had the highest median income at $117,500, while the off‐peak non‐work segment had the lowest median income at $82,500. • The median household income for survey respondents was between $100,000 and $134,999.

Appendix D ‐ 10  Region  Type of Study  Findings Colorado –  Denver  Region  I‐25 Stated  Preference  Survey (2004) 10 • When asked about their attitude to HOT lanes: 56% of Hispanics, 44% of Whites, 25% of African Americans, and 13% of Asian Americans were in favor. • When asked about their willingness to have the option to pay a toll in order to drive alone on the HOT lanes: 47% of Hispanics and 42% of Whites stated that they would like to have the option and 60% of Asian Americans stated that they did not want the option. • When asked about their willingness to carpool to avoid paying a toll: 52% of Whites and 72% of Hispanics stated that they would be willing to carpool. • Survey reported that income, gender, and county of residence were not determinants on whether the respondents wanted the option to pay the toll. • Within race and ethnic groups, 26% of Whites and 20% of Hispanics that were opposed to HOT lanes were concerned that HOT lanes were unfair to low‐income individuals. • Persons who were opposed to HOT lanes were also concerned because they had already paid their taxes with 37% of Whites and 30% of Hispanics sharing this concern. • Survey reported that income was not a strong determinant of respondent’s attitude toward HOT lanes. • When asked about fairness of HOT lanes for low‐income individuals: respondents with incomes less than $25,000 and over $75,000 were concerned that HOT lanes are not fair to persons with lower incomes. • The clearest determinant for preference in this survey was age.  The survey did not find very significant differences in preference between different income, race/ethnicity, or resident location groups. • Survey asked respondents their preference for allowing single‐occupancy drivers to utilize the HOT lanes in exchange for paying a toll: 35% of persons with incomes less than $25,000 were in favor, 27% of respondents with incomes between $35,000 and $49,999, and 52% of respondents with incomes over $75,000 were in favor of this option. • The survey asked respondents how their opinions toward HOT lanes had changed since the start of the survey: 21% of respondents with incomes under $25,000 changed opinions from undecided to opposed, 50% with incomes between $25,000 and $49,999 changed opinions from undecided to favorable, and 47% with incomes over $75,000 changed opinions from undecided to favorable.

Appendix D ‐ 11  Region  Type of Study  Findings Georgia –  Atlanta  Region  I‐85 Express  Lanes Before/  After  Implementation  Survey (2011– 2012) 11  • Blacks, Asians, and other minorities decreased the number of one or more weekly trips made in the HOV lanes (wave 1) compared to one or more weekly trips made in the express lanes (wave 2).  Asians and Blacks decreased their usage by seven percentage points, other minorities decreased usage by twelve percentage points, and Whites usage of the lanes remained fairly constant only increasing by one percentage point. • Most respondents agreed with the statement “Tolls are unfair to those with limited incomes.”  However, there were sizable differences between groups over their level of agreement; Whites (55%), Blacks (65%), and Asians (58%) agree with the statement, in comparison to Whites (33%), Blacks (16%), and Asians (16%) who disagree.  Blacks agreed with the statement at 49 more percentage points, Asians at 42 more percentage points, and Whites at 22 more percentage points. • Within each racial category there was a difference in agreement with the statement “I will use a toll route if the tolls are reasonable and I will save time.”  Whites equally agreed and disagreed with the statement, more Blacks disagreed with the statement by 12 percentage points, and more Asians agreed with the statement by 10 percentage points. • More respondents disagreed than agreed with the statement “Express Lanes have improved my travel;” 56% of Whites, 55% of Blacks, and 47% of Asians disagreed. • Express Lane users were less likely to be comprised of lower‐income residents; 9% out of the 14% sampled with incomes less than $50,000 compared to 15% of the 12% sampled with incomes over $150,000 traveled more than once a week on the Express Lanes. • Transponder ownership differs significantly by income; 20% of households with incomes less than $50,000 compared to 41% of households with incomes between $100,000 and $149,999 owned a Peach Pass (local transponder for the Atlanta metropolitan region). • Households with incomes less than $50,000 disagreed more than agreed by 10 percentage points and households with incomes over $150,000 agreed more than disagreed by 18 percentage points that they would be willing to use a toll route if it the toll was priced reasonably and the route saved time. • The number of trips made using the corridor before and after implementation is not significantly correlated with income as households within the middle‐income groups (3‐5 times and 5‐10 times the poverty level established by the U.S. Census Bureau) made the most trips and all income groups reduced the number of trips between wave 1 (before) and wave 2 (after). • Agreement with the statement “tolls are unfair to those with limited incomes” remained fairly the same for persons in the lowest‐ income group, from 67% in wave 1 to 61% in wave 2, while persons in the highest income group altered their position, from 71% agreement in wave 1 to 44% agreement in wave 2. Georgia –  Atlanta  Region  I‐75 South Stated  Preference  Survey between   I‐285 and SR 16  (2007) 12 • Blacks have significantly higher values of time than other races in the sample after differences such as income and purpose of trip are taken into account. • The respondents trip origin location helps determine their value of time, but the study also finds that value of time does not increase proportionately with income.  Value of time savings is about 15% lower for incomes less than $35,000 and 20% higher for incomes greater than $125,000 compared to the average value of time for the trip origin.

Appendix D ‐ 12  Region  Type of Study  Findings Georgia –  Atlanta  Region  I‐20, I‐75, I‐95,  and I‐285 Stated  Preference  Survey (2007) 13 • Survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity. • Most respondents (50%) indicated that they would purchase electronic toll collection transponder as a way to pay for the toll rather than pay for a video tolling transaction.  Of the respondents with incomes below $25,000, 49% compared to 84% of respondents with incomes over $150,000 stated that they would be very or somewhat likely to pay the toll with transponder. • Households with incomes less than $50,000 accounted for 44% compared to 21% of the households with incomes over $100,000 whose trips occurred at off‐peak hours. • People with higher incomes are more likely to have their home as the place of origin for their commute than people in lower‐income ranges, 6.3% of trips taken by persons with incomes under $25,000 compared to 17.5% of trips taken by persons with incomes over $150,000 were home‐based to work trips. I‐75 South Stated  Preference  Survey between  I‐285 and I‐575  (2005) 14 • Survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity. • Willingness to pay does not increase proportionally with income.  Persons with an income between $50,000 and $60,000 have an average value of time savings less than the average value of time for persons with an income between $45,000 and 50,000. Illinois –  Chicago  Region  Chicago‐Region  (Cook, Lake,  DuPage Counties)  Travel Stated  Preference  Survey (2008) 15  • Survey did not report results broken down by race and/or ethnicity. • Cost sensitivity reduces as income increases and value of time increases as income increases but begins to plateau at incomes beyond $250,000. • Value of time savings for shopping, school, social/recreational and other personal business trip purposes is higher than the value of time for work for households with incomes between $50,000 and $100,000.

   Appendix D ‐ 13  Region  Type of Study  Findings Kentucky  (Louisville)  and  Southern  Indiana  Region   Ohio River  Bridges Crossing  Facility, Intercept  Community  Survey (2014) 16     Intercept survey targeted specifically to low‐income and minority populations.   Respondents were divided on tolled bridge effects: would have no impact (30%), result in switching to untolled routes (31%), reduce  cross‐river trips (26%), lead to greater use of carpools or transit (18%).    Tolled bridge would have no impact on lifestyle (66%).   Free bridge would be an effective option (70%).    Funds for transit agency to buy more buses and vans, create more park‐and‐ride lots, and make other public transportation  improvements would be an effective option for travelers to avoid paying the toll (63%).    With improved transit services would consider using public transportation to cross bridge instead of driving (48%).    Toll account minimum balance of $20 or less would be considered a low minimum amount (70%).     Strategies likely to Increase respondents willingness to use transponder: lower toll rate (40%), free transponder (58%), convenient  locations (48%), online ordering (45%), low minimum balance (44%), convenient transponder refills (44%), account tied to card or  bank account (43%). 

Appendix D ‐ 14  Region  Type of Study  Findings Minnesota  – St. Paul and  Minnea‐ polis  Region  I‐394  Minneapolis‐  St. Paul,  Minnesota  Attitudinal Panel  Survey (2004‐ 2006) 17  • The survey sample included few people representing racial or ethnic minorities. Transponder owners were more likely to be White than a racial minority; 16% of White respondents compared to 11% of minority respondents owned transponders. • Respondents in different income groups agreed that single‐occupancy drivers should be allowed to use carpool lanes if they pay a fee; 71% of higher‐income (greater than $125,0000) respondents, 61% of middle‐income (between $50,000 and $124,999), and 64% of lower‐income (less than $50,000) respondents agreed. • Usage of MnPASS lanes decreased with income; 79% of higher‐income respondents, 70% of middle‐income respondents, and 55% of lower‐income respondents used the MnPASS. • Between respondents in the lower and middle‐income group, there is no significant difference in value of time.  However the value of time is $6.45, almost 70% higher than the base level of $9.63 for respondents in the higher‐income group. • Income, age, and other characteristics are important determinants of value of willingness to pay regardless of whether or not a person is a transponder owner. • Carpooling on the MnPASS lanes decreased with income; 75% of lower‐income drivers carpooled compared to 52% of higher‐income and 66% of middle‐income drivers. • Respondents within the higher‐income group were more likely to travel alone and pay the toll on the MnPASS lanes; 40% of higher‐ income drivers traveled alone paying a toll compared to 7% of lower‐income and 18% of middle‐income drivers. • Transponder ownership increased with income; 35% of higher‐income, 12% of middle‐income, and 4% of lower‐income respondents owned a transponder. • Of those that thought it is a good idea for single‐occupancy vehicles (SOVs) to pay a toll in order to use carpool lanes, 21% of higher‐ income, 18% of middle‐income, and 14% of lower‐income respondents felt this way because “it provides a better use for carpool lanes.” • Of those that thought it was a bad idea for SOVs to pay a toll in order to use carpool lanes, 1% of higher‐income, 7% of middle‐ income, and 16% of lower‐income respondents felt this way because “it is unfair.” • Income was not a strong determinant for people to feel that SOVs using the carpool lanes for a fee was a bad idea because it “only benefits the rich;” 13% of higher‐income, 12% of middle‐income, and 11% of lower‐income respondents felt this way. Oregon –  Portland  Region &  Washing‐ ton –  Vancouver  Region  Columbia River  Crossing Stated  Preference  Survey (2009) 18 • Survey does not report results broken down by race and/or ethnicity. • Survey reports that cost sensitivity decreases as household income increases showing that value of time increases with household income.

   Appendix D ‐ 15  Region  Type of Study  Findings Texas –  Houston,  Dallas and  Fort Worth  Region  Katy Freeway  Stated  Preference  Survey (2008) 19  • Survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity.   • Low‐ and high‐income groups have higher mean value of travel time savings compared to medium‐income group.  The survey  reports that the low‐income group having a higher mean value of travel time savings may be attributed to schedule inflexibility of  persons with lower‐paying jobs.  Texas –  Houston,  Dallas and  Fort Worth  Region  Houston and  Dallas, Texas  Regions Stated  Preference  Survey (2006) 20  • When the survey asked respondents their interest in managed lanes: 69.5% of African Americans, 72.7% of Whites, and 56% of  respondents who identified as “other” in race category expressed interest.   • Level of interest in managed lanes increased with household income: 67% of respondents with household incomes less than $25,000  and 79% of respondents with household incomes greater than $100,000 reported being interested in managed lanes.   I‐30 Express  Lanes Loyalty  Reward Incentive  Preferences  Survey (2005) 21  • Survey asked respondents about race and ethnicity; however the survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity.   • A majority of respondents identified as White/Caucasian.  • Survey asked respondents about income ranges, however the survey did not report results broken out by income.  • Majority of the respondents reported having a household income between $100,000 and $199,999.  Texas –  Houston,  Dallas and  Fort Worth  Region  Katy Freeway and  US 290 Stated  Preference Wave  2 Survey  (November    2003) 22  • Survey does not report results broken down by race and/or ethnicity.  • QuickRide participants were significantly more likely at 60.8% to have an income in excess of $100,000.  Katy Freeway and  US 290 Stated  Preference Wave  1 Survey (March  2003) 23  • Survey does not report results broken down by race and/or ethnicity.  • The survey reports that households with annual an income of $50,000 or less are more likely to use QuickRide than those with a  household income in excess of $50,000 per year.   • Hourly wage rate was determined to be an insignificant predictor of QuickRide Usage. 

Appendix D ‐ 16  Region  Type of Study  Findings Washing‐ ton –  Seattle  Region  SR 520 Bridge  Before & After  Implementation  Survey (2010 &  2012) 24  • Survey did not report results broken out by race and/or ethnicity. • Lower‐income households were less likely to have a transponder, but the most frequent reason given was infrequent use of tolled roads rather than expense of the transponder itself or the difficulty of opening and maintaining an account. • The amount of tolls paid per year increases with income. The difference in tolls paid stemmed from the difference in the number of tolled trips made and not differences in use of lanes during peak and off‐peak rate times. • Households earning less than $50,000 per year paid an average of $0.67 in tolls over a two‐day period compared to households earning between $200,000 and $250,000 that paid $3.35 on average. • Members of the lowest‐income group cut back on travel more than others. Those earning around $40,000 decreased trips by 28% compared to a 19% trip reduction by the entire sample. • For discretionary trip purposes such as shopping, the lowest‐income group reduced trips by 51% compared to 25% trip reduction by the entire sample. • Drivers’ likelihood to utilize I‐90 instead of SR 520 increased as income declined. In wave 1, 32% of drivers with incomes less than $100,000 switched compared to 21% of drivers with incomes above $100,000, and 73% of drivers with incomes over $250,000 did not switch compared to 55% of all drivers who remained on SR 520. • The lowest‐income group had a 51% drop in the number of discretionary cross lake trips. • Individuals with lower incomes were more likely than individuals with higher incomes to agree that tolls are unfair to people with limited incomes. • In the before survey, 48% of the lowest‐income group agreed that they would use a tolled route; in the after survey this number increased to 57%. Sources:   1  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2009.  Express Lanes Congestion Reduction Demonstration Program License Plate Survey Report.   2  Redhill Group, Inc.  2012.  ExpressLanes Public Education and Market Research Support: 2012 Pre‐Implementation Survey License Plate Study.  Prepared for  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.   3  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2013.  Equity Plan Survey Analysis.  4  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2014.  Post‐Deployment License Plate Survey.   5  Noble Insight, Inc.  2015.  Metro ExpressLanes Low Income Field Surveys.  Prepared for Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  6  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2008.  I‐110 Corridor General Public and Environmental Justice Survey.  7  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2008.  Los Angeles County General Public and Environmental Justice Survey.  8  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.  2008.  San Gabriel Valley General Public and Environmental Justice Survey.  9  Resource Systems Group (RSG), Inc.  2010.  Appendix 1: Denver‐Boulder Stated Preference Survey Report of Investment Grade Traffic and Revenue Study U.S.  36 Managed Lanes.  Prepared for Wilbur Smith Associates and Colorado Department of Transportation.  Retrieved from  https://www.codot.gov/library/studies/us‐36‐managed‐lanes‐investment‐grade‐traffic‐and‐revenue‐study/WS%20T‐R%20Final%20Appendices1.pdf 

   Appendix D ‐ 17  10  Ungemah, D., Swisher, M., Tighe, C.  2005.  Discussing High‐Occupancy Toll Lanes with the Denver, Colorado, Public.  Transportation Research Record: Journal  of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1932, 129‐136.     UrbanTrans.  2004.  I‐25 HOT Lanes Public Outreach: Summary Report: Stated Preference Telephone Survey.  Prepared for Colorado Department of  Transportation.  11  Peirce, S., Petrella, M., Puckett, S., Minnice, P., Lappin, J., Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  2014.  Urban Partnership Agreement and Congestion  Reduction Demonstration Programs: Lessons Learned on Congestion Pricing from the Seattle and Atlanta Household Travel Behavior Surveys.  Prepared for  U.S. Federal Highway Administration.  Retrieved from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/54000/54000/54065/UPA‐ CRD_Panel_Survey_Lessons_Learned_Final_Report_Volpe.pdf  Peirce, S., Petrella, M., and Green, E.  2014.  2010–2012 Longitudinal Household Travel Diary Study: Seattle & Atlanta.  Poster.  Retrieved from  http://static.tti.tamu.edu/conferences/tss12/posters/14.pdf  Petrella, M., Puckett, S., Peirce, S., Minnice, P., Lappin, J., Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  2014.  Effects of an HOV‐2 to HOT‐3 Conversion on  Traveler Behavior: Evidence from a Panel Study of I‐85 Corridor in Atlanta (Final Report).  Prepared for the U.S. Federal Highway Administration.  Retrieved  from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/54000/54000/54062/CRD_Panel_Survey_Atlanta_Final_Report_Volpe.pdf  Ray, R., Petrella, M., Peirce, S., Minnice, P., Puckett, S., Lappin, J., Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  2014.  Exploring the Equity Impacts of Two  Road Pricing Implementations Using a Traveler Behavior Panel Survey: Full Facility Pricing on SR 520 in Seattle and the I‐85 HOT‐2 to HOT‐3 Conversion in  Atlanta (Final Report).  Prepared for the U.S. Federal Highway Administration.  Retrieved from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/54000/54000/54064/UPA‐ CRD_Panel_Survey_Equity_Final_Report_Volpe.pdf  Zimmerman, C., Gopalakrishna, D., Pessaro, B., Goodin, G., Saunoi‐Sangren, E.  2011.  Atlanta Congestion Reduction Demonstration: National Evaluation:  Surveys and Interviews Test Plan.  U.S. Department of Transportation.  Retrieved from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/51000/51600/51687/11‐104.pdf  12  HNTB Corporation.  2008.  Study of Potential Managed Lanes on I‐75 South Corridor: Final.  Prepared for Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority.  Retrieved  from http://www.georgiatolls.com/assets/docs/I‐75_VPPP_Final_Report.pdf   NuStats.  2007.  I‐75 South Stated Preference Survey: Final Report.  Prepared for Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority.   13  Hess, S., et al.  2008.  Managed‐Lanes Stated Preference Survey in Atlanta, Georgia: Measuring Effects of Different Experimental Designs and Survey  Administration Methods.  Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 2049, 144–152.  HNTB Corporation.  2010.  Atlanta Regional Managed Lane System Plan: Stated Preferences Survey.  Prepared for Georgia Department of Transportation.   Resource Systems Group (RSG), Inc.  2010.  Atlanta Regional Managed Lane System Plan: Technical Memorandum 1B: Greater Atlanta Stated Preference  Survey Documentation.  Prepared for Georgia Department of Transportation.  14  NuStats.  2005.  I‐75 Stated Preference Survey: Final Report.  Prepared for Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority.  15  Resource Systems Group (RSG), Inc.  2008.  Documentation for Chicago Travel Options Study.  Prepared for Wilbur Smith Associates and Illinois Tollway  Authority.  16  Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and Indiana Department of Transportation.  2014.  Appendix E3, Louisville‐Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges Project EJ  Community Survey Populations.    17  NuStats.  2005.  I‐394 MnPASS Project Evaluation: Attitudinal Panel Survey: Wave 1: Final Report.  Prepared for the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs,  University of Minnesota.   NuStats.  2006.  MnPASS Evaluation: Attitudinal Panel Survey: Wave 2: Final Report.  Prepared for the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of  Minnesota.   NuStats.  2006.  MnPASS Evaluation: Attitudinal Panel Survey: Wave 3: Final Report.  Prepared for the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of  Minnesota.  18  Resource Systems Group (RSG), Inc.  2009.  Columbia River Crossing Stated Preference Travel Study.  Prepared for Stantec.  Retrieved from  http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/0DDDCE1C‐68F0‐4F10‐A860‐CE92852A0168/0/2012_CRC_ExB.pdf 

   Appendix D ‐ 18  19  Burris, M., Patil, S., Texas A&M Transportation Institute.  2009.  Estimating the Benefits of Managed Lanes. 20  Burris, M., Sadabadi, K.F., Mattingly, S.P., Mahlawat, M., Li, J., Rasmidatta, I., and Saroosh, A.  2007.  Reaction to the Managed Lane Concept by Various Groups  of Travelers.  Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1996, 74–82.  21  Burris, M., Han, N., Geiselbrecht, T., Wood, N., Texas A&M Transportation Institute.  2015.  I‐30 Express Lanes Survey Report.  Prepared for North Central Texas  Council of Governments and the Federal Highway Administration.  22  Burris, M., Appiah, J., Texas A&M Transportation Institute.  2003.  An Examination of Houston’s QuickRide Participants by Frequency of QuickRide Usage.   Prepared for the Texas Department of Transportation.   Burris, M., Figueroa, C.  2006.  Analysis of Traveler Characteristics by Mode Choice in HOT Corridors.  Transportation Research Record: Journal of the  Transportation Research Board, 45 (2), 103‐117.  23  Burris, M., Appiah, J., Texas A&M Transportation Institute.  2003.  An Examination of Houston’s QuickRide Participants by Frequency of QuickRide Usage.   Prepared for the Texas Department of Transportation.  24  Batelle Memorial Institute.  2009.  Seattle‐Lake Washington Corridor Urban Partnership Agreement National Evaluation Plan.  Prepared for U.S. Department of  Transportation.  Retrieved from http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/congestionpricing/assets/docs/fhwajpo10017/seattleupa.pdf  Peirce, S, et al., Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  2014.  Urban Partnership Agreement and Congestion Reduction Demonstration Programs:  Lessons Learned on Congestion Pricing from the Seattle and Atlanta Household Travel Behavior Surveys.  Prepared for the Federal Highway Administration.   Retrieved from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/54000/54000/54065/UPA‐CRD_Panel_Survey_Lessons_Learned_Final_Report_Volpe.pdf  Peirce, S, et al., Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  2014.  Effects of Full‐Facility Variable Tolling on Traveler Behavior: Evidence from a Panel Study  of the SR‐520 Corridor in Seattle.  Prepared for the Federal Highway Administration.  Peirce, S., et al, 2014.  2010‐2012 Longitudinal Household Travel Diary Study:  Seattle & Atlanta.  Poster.  Retrieved from  http://static.tti.tamu.edu/conferences/tss12/posters/14.pdf  Ray, R, et al., Volpe National Transportation System Center.  2014.  Exploring the Equity Impacts of Two Road Pricing Implementations Using a Traveler  Behavior Panel Survey: Full Facility Pricing on SR 520 in Seattle and the I‐85 HOT‐2 to HOT‐3 Conversion in Atlanta (Final Report).  Prepared for the Federal  Highway Administration.  Retrieved from http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/54000/54000/54064/UPA‐CRD_Panel_Survey_Equity_Final_Report_Volpe.pdf  

Appendix D ‐ 19  Appendix Below are four tables from the MTC Regional Express Lanes Interstate 680 Corridor Environmental Justice Technical Memorandum Appendix C:  Summary of  Express Lane Surveys Before and After Implementation.    Exhibit A‐1.   Express Lane General Public Perceptions Prior to Implementation Region  Type of Study  Findings  Denver,  CO  2005 survey  conducted before  implementation  on  I‐25 1   Stakeholder interviews of 21 persons indicated strong support for I‐25 high‐occupancy toll (HOT) lanes, only 1 person opposed with different opinions for use of revenue.  Five focus groups of unknown number of persons representing various highway corridors in the region, no breakout of information by income or minority groups, people generally supportive of HOT lanes, individual concerns about operation issues and use of revenue; and in each of the focus groups concern expressed that lower‐income persons (income group not defined) would not be able to afford to use the HOT lanes, also concern that HOT lanes would replace other planned transportation improvement projects.  Three open house involving more than 500 persons of which 100 completed survey and virtual open house involving more than 1,000 and 700 surveys – generally in favor of HOT lanes when people understand the concept and positive response increases with more information provided about how HOT lanes work, no breakout provided for income or minority groups.  The surveys did not find significant differences in preference between different groups of income, ethnicity, or residential location. Minneapolis,  MN  Focus groups prior  to project  implementation  on I‐394 (2007) 2   Five focus groups, participants selected randomly to be representative of the region’s demographic characteristics, qualitative results reported only.  Market research with 2004 focus groups comprised a mix of people by age, gender, and income groups.  Focus group participants raised concern that express lanes would generally be “unfair” to low‐income drivers. Miami,  FL  1995 and 2000  surveys in advance  of I‐95 high‐ occupancy vehicle  (HOV) conversion  to HOT 3   Telephone survey of 1,192 residents of the three‐county region.  Overall, general public did not believe implementation of express lane on the HOV corridor would be a good idea, results for different demographic and use characteristics did not vary, extremely difficult to identify any group in support of the project.  People did not believe they should pay for highway use, express lanes have no impacts on congestion, toll on HOV lane and allowing single‐occupancy vehicles (SOVs) defeated purpose of the HOV lanes.  Anticipated use of existing HOV not broken out by income group.

Appendix D ‐ 20  Exhibit A‐1.  Express Lane General Public Perceptions Prior to Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings  Alameda  County, CA  2007 survey of  public attitudes  for I‐580 and  I‐680 Express  Lanes 5   General survey of 466 persons with 95% confidence level, little breakdown in respondent income groups.  Total of 95% of respondents had heard of carpool or commuter lanes, but only 71% had heard of toll or HOT lanes.  Where 85% saw adding lanes a help to resolve traffic congestion, only 62% stated carpool lanes, and only 35% toll or HOT lanes.  64% of respondents commented toll/HOT lanes were a good idea after presented with a description of a HOT lane.  Highest levels of support from those anticipating frequent use, income of $150,000 or more, FasTrak device owners, and I‐680 commuters.  Highest levels of opposition from those not anticipating use, do not think toll lanes reduce congestion, and live at the western end of corridor.  18% of respondents anticipated daily use, 20% anticipated use several times per month, and 39% anticipated they would not use.  A total of 80% of respondents thought carpoolers should continue to use for free and 64% thought solo drivers should have a choice to use.  Important concerns included:  lane for the rich (53%), have to get FasTrak (48%), and off‐peak drivers would pay (48%).  An estimated 33% thought the toll revenue should go toward more toll lanes and public transit. Santa Clara  County,  CA  2008 attitude  survey for SR 85  Express Lanes  with diverse SR 85  users 6   Interview survey of 42 residents screened to be representative of the region’s demographics. Survey report did not present responses broken out by minority or income groups.  Participants were not aware of express lanes as a traffic management tool for heavy congestion, including an existing HOV lane system.  Participants were pleased with operation of the existing HOV system but felt it was underused; existing HOV carpoolers perceived the express lane system as removing some of their current privileges and congestion would increase.  Participants recognized benefits, especially choice, with express lane and proposed revenue spent on additional corridor improvements such as transit service; many participants said they would not use unless an emergency due to prohibitive cost.  Participants had different opinions about the equity or fairness of the express lane, but felt it would not be fair to require a toll when traffic moving in all lanes, e.g., evenings, holidays, and weekends.

   Appendix D ‐ 21  Exhibit A‐1.  Express Lane General Public Perceptions Prior to Implementation  Region  Type of Study  Findings  San  Francisco, CA  2007 survey about  congestion pricing  for downtown   San Francisco 4   Survey with 600 respondents with 95% overall confidence level; respondents were:  54.5% White, 6.3% Black, 15.5% Asian,  11.7% Hispanic, 7.8% other, and some persons refusing to answer.     Respondents’ income information: 9.3% of respondents with income less than $25,000, 18.8% with income $25,000‐$49,999,  13.5% with income $50,000‐74,999, 42.7% with income greater than $75,000, and 14.0% refused to provide household income  information.   Awareness of congestion pricing:  32.3% San Francisco County residents, 18.3% nearby county residents (Alameda, Contra  Costa, Marin, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties), and 25.3% overall.   Awareness of congestion pricing when definition read:  65.3% San Francisco County residents, 54.0% other county residents,  and 59.7% overall.   Very little concern about implementing congestion pricing resulting in low‐income motorists having less access to downtown  San Francisco:  2.9% San Francisco County residents, 3.19% other county residents, and 3.4% overall; no breakout of question  by income or minority groups.   Little difference in responses from San Francisco County and surrounding counties.  Sources:  1.  Ungemah et al., 2005.  2.  Buckeye and Munich, 2006.  3.  FDOT, 2000.  4.  J.D. Franz Research, 2007.  5.  SA Opinion Research, 2007.  6.  SA Opinion Research, 2008.  Notes:  HOV = high‐occupancy vehicle; SOV = single‐occupancy vehicle; HOT = high‐occupancy toll             

Appendix D ‐ 22  Exhibit A‐2.  Express Lane Perceptions by Income Group Prior to Implementation Region  Type of Study  Findings  Denver, CO  2005 survey  conducted before  implementation on  I‐25 1  Telephone interviews of 350 persons in I‐25 corridor; results indicated general support for the high‐occupancy toll (HOT) lane project.   40% of respondents making <$35,000 approved of HOT lane project, with 22% disapproving and 33% undecided.  Lower‐income groups did not raise concern about affordability and fairness of HOT lanes. Minneapolis,  MN  Focus groups prior  to project  implementation on I‐ 394 (2007) 2   Survey did not report results by income groups. Miami, FL  1995 and 2000  surveys in advance  of I‐95 high  occupancy vehicle  (HOV) conversion to  HOT 3   46% of lower‐income (<$30,000) persons use the I‐95 HOV lanes and carpool and 54% of higher‐income (>$30,000) persons do not; of persons who do not carpool on I‐95, 76% are higher‐income persons and 24% are lower‐income persons.  23% low‐income (<$40,000), 16% medium‐income ($40,000‐$70,000), and 18% high‐income (>$70,000) persons reported high support of the project; whereas 40% low‐income, 60% medium‐income, and 57% high‐income persons actively opposed the project.  Little difference between corridor and regional income demographics. San Francisco,  CA  2007 survey about  congestion pricing for  downtown San  Francisco 4  Survey did not report results by income groups. Alameda  County, CA  2007 survey of public  attitudes for I‐580  and I‐680 Express  Lanes 5  Highest levels of support from those anticipating frequent use, income of $150,000 or more, FasTrak device owners, and I‐680 commuters. Santa Clara  County,  CA  2008 attitude survey  for SR 85 Express  Lanes with diverse SR  85 users 6  No responses broken out by income group. Sources:  1.  Ungemah et al., 2005.  2.  Buckeye and Munich, 2006.  3.  FDOT, 2000.  4.  J.D. Franz Research, 2007.  5.  SA Opinion Research, 2007.  6.  SA Opinion Research, 2008.  Notes:    HOV = high‐occupancy vehicle; SOV = single‐occupancy vehicle; HOT = high‐occupancy toll 

Appendix D ‐ 23  Sources:  1.  Ungemah et al., 2005.  2.  Buckeye and Munich, 2006.  3.  FDOT, 2000.  4.  J.D. Franz Research, 2007.  5.  SA Opinion Research, 2007.  6.  SA Opinion Research, 2008.  Notes:    HOV = high‐occupancy vehicle; SOV = single‐occupancy vehicle; HOT = high‐occupancy toll  Exhibit A‐3.  Express Lane Perceptions By Minority Group Prior to Implementation  Region  Type of Study  Findings  Denver, CO  2005 survey  conducted before  implementation on  I‐25 1  Surveys did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity. Minneapolis, MN  Focus groups prior  to project  implementation on  I‐394 (2007) 2   Survey did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity. Miami, FL  1995 and 2000  surveys in advance of  I‐95 high‐occupancy  vehicle (HOV)  conversion to high‐ occupancy toll (HOT) 3   Persons who use I‐95 for trips less than 10 miles are 68% White, 22% African American, and 7% Hispanic.  Persons who do not use I‐95 for trips less than 10 miles are 67% White, 13% African American, and 17% Hispanic.  Of White persons, 16% highly support the I‐95 HOT lane project and 60% actively oppose the project; for African Americans 31% highly support and 39% actively oppose; and for Hispanics 24% highly support and 41% actively oppose.  Disparity in race distribution between the corridor and region could result in inequitable impacts related to race. San Francisco, CA  2007 survey about  congestion pricing  for downtown San  Francisco 4  Survey did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity. Alameda County,  CA  2007 survey of  public attitudes  for I‐580 and I‐680  Express Lanes 5   Survey did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity. Santa Clara County,  CA  2008 attitude survey  for SR 85 Express  Lanes with diverse  SR 85 users 6  Survey did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity.

Appendix D ‐ 24  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation  Region  Type of Study  Findings  Denver,  CO  PowerPoint  presentation of   I‐25 Express Lane  users based on  2008 survey 1   Survey did not report results broken out by minority groups, either race or ethnicity. Survey did not ask about fairness.  No income breakout for why use of express lanes and satisfaction.  Demographics of respondents did represent demographics of the corridor.  Highway segment connects zip code neighborhoods with a diversity of income with destination zip codes with higher average worker pay.  Users were:  2% with income <$30,000, 7% with income between $30,000‐$50,000, 17% with income between $50,000‐$75,000, 17% with income between $75,000‐$100,000, 25% with income between $100,000‐$150,000, and 22% with income >$150,000.  Users skewed toward higher‐income groups compared to the regional demographic characteristics with 2% of respondents with income less than $30,000 compared to 25% in the region. Houston, TX  I‐10 Katy Freeway  QuickRide Equity  Analysis based  on  2004 enrollee survey  and 1998 use data 2  Survey did not report results by minority groups, either race or ethnicity.  Users of tolled high‐occupancy vehicle carpool with 2 persons (HOV2) did not vary by occupation, age, or household size.  Users tended to be higher‐income with analysis showing 13.2% users vs. 23.4% non‐users for income group <$50,000; 18.4% users vs. 16.9% non‐users for income group $50,000‐$75,000; 25.0% users vs. 22.6% non‐users for income group $75,000‐$100,000; and 43.4% users vs. 37.1% non‐user for income group >$100,000. Average household income was $103,454 for users vs. $94,194 for non‐users.  Anticipated use of the facility greatly overestimated compared to actual frequency, but did not vary significantly by socioeconomic characteristics.  Lower‐ and higher‐income groups had similar usage patterns suggesting that household income may not be a significant factor in usage.  Usage did not vary by age, household size, or occupation.  Whether cost was a factor and to what degree did not differ by socioeconomic groups.  Comparison of QuickRide users (HOV2+ pay toll in HOV3+ lanes during peak periods) with non‐users showed substantial discrepancies between income groups at the lowest and highest categories only – 13.2% of users and 23.4% of non‐users had incomes <$50,000, whereas 43.4% of users and 37.1% of non‐users had incomes >$100,000 ($1998) with the average household income of $103,000 for users.  For non‐enrollees, 16% commented no one to carpool with, 15% did not know how to sign up, 14% HOV lanes should be free, 12% price is too high, and 12% do not want to carpool with another person.

Appendix D ‐ 25  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Houston, TX  I‐10 QuickRide survey  of users in March and  November 2003 3  Survey did not ask questions about minority, either race or ethnicity, or fairness/equity.  Slow and steady increased usage of QuickRide since implementation in 1998.  Survey responses in 2003 indicated only 58.3% had heard of the QuickRide program (HOV2 tolling).  Highway users included:  1.9% with income <$30,000 vs. 0.2% using QuickRide; 12.2% with income range $30,000 ‐  $50,000 vs. 6.6% using QuickRide; 18.0% with income range $50,000‐$75,000 vs. 13.4% using QuickRide; 20.6% with income range $75,000‐ $100,000 vs. 17.5% using QuickRide; and 46.7% with income >$100,000 vs. 60.8% using QuickRide.  All income groups <$100,000 proportionally had more users using non‐tolled lanes, but for the income group >$100,000 the proportion using QuickRide is substantially higher (over 14 percentage points).  Overall, QuickRide participants (HOV2 pay toll in HOV3+ lanes during peak periods) are likely to be over 65 years old, have a post‐graduate degree, have a household income greater than $100,000, and be on a trip to school.  Those who had incomes <$35,000 comprised 8.4% of transit riders, 7.3% of persons driving alone in the general purpose lanes, 6.7% carpooled in general purpose lanes, and 6.6% carpooled in HOV lanes (HOV3+ no toll). Houston, TX  I‐10 Katy Freeway   HOT Lane 2010 survey   of users compared to  2008 survey 4  Survey did not ask questions about minority, either race or ethnicity, or fairness/equity; results not reported by income groups.  Comparable socioeconomic characteristics of 2008 and 2010 survey participants, with 2008 highway user respondents: 3% with income <$25,000, 29% with income between $25,000 ‐$75,000, and 68% with income >$75,000 compared to 2010 income groups of 5%, 35%, and 60%, respectively.  Travelers’ willingness to pay did not change from 2008 pre‐opening and 2010 operation with 42.9% indicating they would use when open and 34.5% indicated they might use the express lanes, 2010 responses indicated 66.3% had used express lanes.  Based on analysis of value of travel time savings (VTTS), an average of $51 per hour of travel time saved was estimated, which is close to willingness to pay for travel time savings plus improved reliability for a total of $61 per hour.  Travelers are including both value of travel time savings plus some additional value for the improved reliability of express lanes.

   Appendix D ‐ 26  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Houston,  TX  I‐10 Katy  Freeway HOT  Lane 2010 survey  to assess value of  travel time  savings (VTTS) 5   No questions or analysis of minorities, either race or ethnicity, or fairness/equity.   Survey to estimate value of travel time savings depending on different types of trips – normal vs. unusual trips.   Survey included six categories of unexpected urgent trips to compare with an ordinary trip purpose.   In general, the VTTS is 3.8 to 5.5 times greater than an ordinary trip purpose.   Mean VTTS was significantly different for income groups; the low‐income group (<$50,000) and high‐income group  (>$100,000) both had higher VTTS compared to the medium‐income group ($50,000 to $100,000).   VTTS of an urgent trip for both medium and high‐income groups exceeds the highest VTTS calculated for an ordinary  trip for the high‐income group.   Percent of low‐income group VTTS exceeding the high‐income group ordinary trip VTTS of $16.72 as follows: 60% of  the time for an important appointment, 95% when late for an appointment, 87% for worried about arriving on time,  32% for being late due to bad weather, and 52% when leaving late and plan to use express lane.   Urgent trip VTTS ranged from $8.00 to $47.50 per hour as compared to $7.40 to $8.60 for an ordinary trip.   For low‐income group, the VTTS range for urgent trips was $9.00 to $35.20 as compared to $8.30 to $27.90 for the  medium‐income group, and $9.80 to $47.50 for the high‐income group.   The VTTS difference for the low‐income group might be attributed to fixed‐schedule constraints associated with lower‐ paying jobs or a possible sampling bias due to potential under sampling of low‐income travelers. 

Appendix D ‐ 27  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Minneapolis,  MN  2004‐2006  longitudinal study  of users 6   Survey did not look at minorities, either race or ethnicity, or fairness/equity.  Survey results showed little difference between responses based on income, gender, and education for support for single‐occupancy vehicles (SOVs) to use express lane system:  61% overall, 65% lower‐income group (<$50,000), and 61% higher‐income group (>$50,000).  Mapped median household income for adjacent zip code areas showed express lane segment traverses through zip codes with income <$62,348 down to <$36,307, with low‐medium to medium density housing with regional transponder ownership highest in zip codes just west of the express system project terminus.  Generally, as median household income increased, there were more trips on express lanes, higher total tolls paid, increased distance from downtown, increased distance using express lanes, and larger average tolls.  An estimated 60% of residents support the express lane facility and varies little for different income groups (derived from 2000 census zip code data).  Residents with higher incomes use the system as paying users more often and thereby capitalize on the direct benefits more often.  Explanation appears to be that both income and location of the facility within a corridor that serves some of the region’s wealthiest residents explain the results.  Those who traveled shorter distances tended to be lower‐income and paid lower average tolls, less in total tolls, and traveled shorter distances.  The longer a transponder is owned, the smaller the predicted average toll suggesting that a learning process takes place.

Appendix D ‐ 28  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Minneapolis, MN  2006 survey of MnPass  users one year after  implementation 7   Survey did not look in detail at minority, either race or ethnicity; low response rate for non‐Whites.  Willingness to pay not statistically different for lower‐income group (<$50,000) and middle‐income group (between $50,000 and $75,000), but rises sharply for higher‐income group (>$100,000).  Project support remained high (65%), consistent among all income groups:  64% lower‐income group, 61% middle‐income group, and 71% high‐income group; project support stable with transit users (49%) and overall express lane opposition diminished over time.  MnPass usage was reported high across all income groups – 69% for all respondents, 55% low‐income, 70% middle‐ income, and 79% higher‐income users.  When using the MnPass Lane, 75% of lower‐income users were carpooling compared to 66% for middle‐income and 52% for higher‐income groups; only 7% of lower‐income paying as solo drivers compared to 18% for middle‐income and 40% of higher‐income users.  Transponders were owned by 4% of lower‐income households compared to 12% for middle‐income and 34% for higher‐ income users; and were similar for White and non‐White racial groups – 16% compared to 11%, respectively. 16% of lower‐income users commented the MnPass Lane was “unfair” compared to 7% middle‐income and 1% higher‐income users, though responses that the facility only benefited the rich were similar across all income groups ranging from 11% to 13%.   Willingness to pay (i.e., value of time) was not significantly different for income groups < $50,000 and between $50,000 and $100,000, but increased sharply with higher‐income group (>$100,000).  Overall, the highest income groups are more frequent users, though all users were similarly happy with the quality of their travel in the MnPass Lane. Orange County,  CA  Survey of SR 91 Express  Lane users (1999) 8   Survey did not look at minority, either race or ethnicity, or fairness/equity.  Levels of approval for variable tolls are not very sensitive to commuters’ income. Reasons not supporting SOV tolled use of HOV lanes include 13% commented that it only benefits the rich.  1999 peak period express lane users:  19% for low‐income group (<$40,000), 23% for middle‐income group (range $40,000‐$60,000), 37% for higher‐income group (range $60,000‐ $100,000), and 21% for highest income group (>$100,000).  Over 5 years (1996‐1999), used by all income groups, with higher usage with higher income for all modes: SOV, HOV2+, HOV 3+.  Express lane use has been static over time with 20% at lowest‐income and 50% at highest income group (constant 1996 to 1999), though decreased middle‐income group between $40,000 and $60,000 from 40% to 25% suggesting sensitivity to toll increases and reduced willingness to pay tolls despite worsening traffic congestions in corridor and similarly affecting SOV and HOV groups in the middle‐income group.  While the frequency of toll lane use varies significantly with income, gender, age, and other characteristics, people from all demographic backgrounds use the facility. Analysis shows that being female is the factor most strongly associated with toll lane use, while high income, age, education, and traveling to work all influencing travelers’ likelihood of obtaining transponders.

Appendix D ‐ 29  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Orange County, CA  Observational data for  SR 91 Express Lanes  (5‐year study,  published in 2001) 9   Survey does not discuss minority, either race or ethnicity, fairness/equity.  1996 data reported 18% low‐income group (<$40,000) used express lanes as compared to 39% for middle‐income group (between $40,000 ‐$60,000). 43% for higher‐income group (between $60,000 ‐$100,000), and 50% for highest income group (>$100,000).  Over time (1996‐1999), more commuters using express lane as it increased from 28.2% to 42.0%. Worsening congestion has reduced some peak period travel. For those who don’t use:  86% cited worse traffic and 9% cited increase in tolls. Female and commuters in the lowest‐income group were significantly more likely to have discontinued use.  People from all demographic backgrounds use the facility, while females particularly aged 30‐50 are factors most strongly associated with toll lane use.  Correlation between income and facility use stable between 1996 and 1999.  Proportion of commuters using facility increased with income for all modes and differences are statistically significant, though saw a decrease in use for the $40,000 to $60,000 income category, from 40% to 25% indicating price sensitivity.  Use of facility was not correlated to household type (i.e., households with children).  No increased patronage of transit service, including express bus and commuter rail line that operate parallel to facility.  Overall level of support is not sensitive to commuters’ household income categories <$100,000, but higher approval with income >$100,000.  Public concerns for equity issues decreased over time as commuters became more familiar with facility operation. San Diego, CA  Survey of I‐15 area  highway users –  FasTrak and other  users following  implementation  (2002) 10   Survey does not address minority, either race or ethnicity, or equity/fairness.  Panel survey of users and non‐users when dynamic pricing was well established.  Travelers must drive 8‐mile length of project by design, so users are often from suburbs with higher incomes.  Users with household income >$100,000 more likely to use express lanes over driving alone.  Carpool choice unaffected by gender, age, education, income, and home ownership.  Highway users for driving alone, FasTrak, carpoolers, and total number by income groups are:  <$20,000: 1.5%, 0.0%, 2.9%, and 8 total responses; between $20,000 and $40,000: 7.1%, 2.5%, 7.7%, and 36 total responses; between $40,000 and $80,000: 44.9%, 25.8%, 45.2%, and 254 total responses; between $80,000 and $120,000: 31.5%, 28.1%, 37.5%, and 240 total responses; and >$120,000: 15.0%, 33.6%, 6.7%, and 145 total responses.  Model estimating mode choice found that carpool choice vs. driving alone in general purpose lanes is unaffected by income when other demographic variables are included. Households with three or more workers are more likely to carpool than one‐ and two‐worker households.  Households earning >$100,000 more likely to pay to travel solo than households with incomes <$40,000.

   Appendix D ‐ 30  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings San Diego,  CA  I‐15 Express Lanes  demonstration project  3‐year survey of users  (2002) 11   Survey did not look at minorities, either race or ethnicity.   Attitudinal survey of 3‐year demonstration express lane project.   FasTrak users came from neighborhoods with the highest income groups.   Respondents believed pricing policies were fair and did not raise equity issues as a concern.   General concerns about the fairness of pricing policies may not arise when revenue use is not perceived as favoring  privileged groups and when a general purpose lane is not taken away to create express lanes.  Seattle,  WA  Pilot study with  variable charges for  highway use (2008) 12   Survey did not look at minority, either race or ethnicity for the demonstration project.   Participants were given a travel account and were charged experimental tolls to access select roadways at particular time  periods; study measured travel behavior before and after tolling to calculate user and societal benefits.   Generally higher‐income participants were less responsive to tolling changing behavior, but not linearly. Initial drop‐offs  indicated middle‐income groups were most sensitive and potentially opposed to variable tolling. Computer modeling  indicated low‐income groups would do most to avoid tolling, and high‐quality transit service may provide good options to  avoid tolling.   Value of commute travel time is close to 75% of wage rate for metro area.   Those who benefit most from network tolling in terms of time savings, reliability benefits, and operating cost savings are  users with high values of time (higher‐income motorists and trucks). Transit users and occupants of HOVs also realize  benefits from tolling.   All else being equal, higher‐income participants were associated with less pronounced travel response to the experimental  tolls.   The computer modeling is consistent with expectations that lower‐income users may do the most to avoid paying road  tolls.   Price sensitivity to tolls is less pronounced as income increases, and moderately more pronounced as higher quality transit  services are available as options to the auto trip.  Seattle,  WA  SR 167 Annual  Performance  Summary (2011) 13   Survey did not look at minority, either race or ethnicity, nor fairness/equity.   Survey of SOV users in HOV lane:  <$20,000 – 1.8%, between $20,000 and $35,000 – 5.7%, between $35,000 and $50,000 –  9.2%, between $50,000 and $75,000 – 18.4%, between $75,000 and $100,000 – 20.1%, between $100,000 and $125,000 –  19.8%, between $125,000 and $150,000 – 9.5%, and >$150,000 – 15.5%.   Users strongly support express lanes:  70% wanted to use again and 62% in favor of more express lanes in the region.   Reasons why used express lanes:  88% used to avoid congested general purpose lanes or to make the trip faster when they  needed to do so.   These results are consistent with past annual performance report findings for this project. 

Appendix D ‐ 31  Exhibit A‐4.  Studies on Express Lane Use After Implementation   Region  Type of Study  Findings Seattle, WA  Estimating toll impacts  based on car  ownership and  transportation  patterns by income  (2011) 14   Survey did not look at minority, either race or ethnicity, nor perceived fairness.  For low‐income households (<200% of federal poverty level) in the four‐county region, car ownership is 78.3% compared to 96.2% for non‐low‐income households, 62.9% drive alone when commuting compared to 72.3%, 13.1% carpool compared to 11.1%, and 12.8% use public transportation compared to 6.9%.  Study examined six major highway corridors in the region proposed for tolling. More than two‐thirds of low‐income commuters use routes that do not include any of these segments, and 22% use one to two segments; low‐income commuters estimated to account for only 9.2% of all segment users.  An estimate of 31.0% of low‐income commuters would use one or more segments compared to 46.2% of higher‐income commuters.  Among all commuters, the implementation of tolls has been perceived as regressive in previous studies, however, this study indicates that the tolls are not borne equally among all households, and 69% of low‐income commuters compared to 56% of non‐low‐income commuters would pay no tolls implying tolling may be less regressive than previously shown. Sources:  1.  Corona Research, 2008.  2.  Burris and Hannay, 2004.  3.  Burris and Figueroa, 2006.  4.  Devanasetty et al., 2012.  5.  Patil et al., 2011.  6.  Patterson and Levinson, 2008.      7. NuStats, 2006. 8. Sullivan, 2000.  9.  Sullivan, 2001.  10.  Brownstone et al., 2002.  11.  Supernak et al., 2002.  12.  PSRC, 2008.  13. WSDOT, 2011.  14.  Plotnick et al., 2011. Notes:    HOV = high‐occupancy vehicle; HOT = high‐occupancy toll; HOV2+ = high‐occupancy‐vehicle carpool of two or more persons; HOV3+ = high‐occupancy‐vehicle carpool of three or more  persons; VTTS = value of travel time savings.  The “QuickRide” system that allowed HOV2 vehicles to pay a $2 toll to drive on an HOV3 lane on the I‐10 Katy Freeway in Houston has been  discontinued with the expansion of managed lanes in 2009; the current system allows HOV2+ vehicles to drive free. 

Next: Appendix E Bibliography »
Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 237: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report presents information gathered in the development of NCHRP Research Report 860: Assessing the Environmental Justice Effects of Toll Implementation or Rate Changes: Guidebook and Toolbox. This web-only document summarizes the technical research and presents the technical memorandum that documents the literature, existing case studies, resource documents, and other reports compiled.

NCHRP Research Report 860 provides a set of tools to enable analysis and measurement of the impacts of toll pricing, toll payment, toll collection technology, and other aspects of toll implementation and rate changes on low-income and minority populations.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!