National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 2.0 Research Methodology
Page 6
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 6
Page 7
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 7
Page 8
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 8
Page 9
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 9
Page 10
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 10
Page 11
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 11
Page 12
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 12
Page 13
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 13
Page 14
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 14
Page 15
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 15
Page 16
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 16
Page 17
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 17
Page 18
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 18
Page 19
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 19
Page 20
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 20
Page 21
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 21
Page 22
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 22
Page 23
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 23
Page 24
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 24
Page 25
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 25
Page 26
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 26
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 27
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 28
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 29
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 30
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 31
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 32
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 33
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 34
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 35
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 36
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 37
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 38
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 39
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 40
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 41
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 42
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 44
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 45
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 46
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 47
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 48
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 49
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 51
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 52
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 53
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 54
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 55
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 56
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 57
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 58
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 59
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 60
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 61
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 62
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 63
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 64
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 65
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 66
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 68
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 69
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 70
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 71
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 72
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 73
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 74
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 75
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 76
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 77
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 78
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 79
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 80
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 81
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 82
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 83
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 84
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 85
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 86
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 88
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 89
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 90
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 91
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 92
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"3.0 Research Results." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 93

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 6  3.0 Research Results 3.1 Summary of Literature Review During Task 1, the Research Team conducted a multi‐pronged  literature review, examining the existing  academic  literature,  policy  reports,  project  specific  documents,  resource  guides,  case  studies,  and  effective  practices  on  issues  relevant  to  consideration  of  equity  and  environmental  justice  on  toll  implementation and  rate  change  studies.   The  review of existing  literature and ongoing  research has  further  informed  the Research Team’s understanding of  the current state‐of‐the‐practice, allowed  the  research  ream  to  further  identify  resources  and  tools  for  reference  purposes  (e.g.,  bibliography  and  literature  review), and provided opportunities  to  inventory approaches and  tools  for possible  further  research as part of the interview plan (Task 4) and development of the toolkit (Tasks 5 and 6).   3.1.1 Methodology 3.1.1.1  Document Identification  The Research Team drew upon  its  in‐house  libraries, past projects, often‐used reference materials and  resources, the Transportation Research Information Services, Google Scholar and other Internet sources,  as well as discussions with professional contacts to compile and organize a preliminary list of documents  by  relevant  topics  of  this  study.    Various  resources  were  identified,  including  legislation,  executive  orders,  agency  policy  guidance,  technical  assistance  products,  practitioner  and  academic  research  papers,  books,  systems  planning,  statewide  and  metropolitan  planning  and  state  and  federal  environmental (NEPA‐related) reports, and other studies addressing the topics of toll pricing and equity,  environmental justice, community impact assessment, public engagement and communications, market  research,  demographic  trends,  transportation  finance,  and  transportation  planning  and  policy.    The  bibliographic  materials  were  compiled  to  assess  the  state‐of‐the‐practice  and  to  inform  the  development of the Guidebook and Toolbox (see Appendix D, Bibliography).    The documents  included  in  the Bibliography  are organized  into  four major  categories:  1)  Equity  and  Pricing;  2)  Environmental  Justice/Title  VI/Community  Impact  Assessment  and  Mitigation;  3)  Public  Involvement and Communications; and 4) Demographic and Cultural Trends, Patterns and Perspectives.    3.1.1.2  Literature Review Summaries  Literature review summaries were prepared for a subset of the compiled bibliographic materials.  While  examining  the  predominantly  policy  resource  and  academic  research‐related  publications,  key  focus  areas  expected  to be  relevant  to  the Guidebook  and  Toolbox were  considered,  including  tolling  and  pricing scenarios and collection technologies, legal and regulatory criteria and considerations, analytical  methods  and  impact  measures,  public  engagement  approaches  and  methods,  mitigation  and  compensation  strategies,  and  data  requirements  and  trends.    These  focus  areas were  classification  touchstones  for  the  Research  Team  to  assess  systematically  as  part  of  the  literature  reviews.   Documents were also classified by their document type; topics and themes covered; type of sponsoring  agency  or  organization;  geographic  area;  type  of  tolling  facility,  context,  and  pricing  arrangements;  specific  focus  on  distributional  effects  on  low‐income, minority,  or  other  traditionally  disadvantaged  populations; and stage of decisionmaking.  The article or report’s relevance to the state‐of‐the‐practice  review and Guidebook and Toolbox was also critically assessed.  Literature  review  summaries are provided  in Appendix A.   They  represent  the effort of  the Research  Team  to  systematically  screen  for  key  issues,  methods,  challenges,  case  examples,  and  effective  practices  relevant  to  assessing  environmental  justice  considerations  for  toll  implementation  projects  and rate change initiatives that will be addressed as part of the Guidebook.   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 7  More than 60 documents were reviewed during this stage to support an initial assessment of the state‐ of‐the‐practice.   These documents also  informed  the development of a content  review  template  that  was used to assess the current state‐of‐the‐practice in conducting environmental justice analyses on toll  implementation and rate change projects.  3.1.2 Articles Reviewed for Literature Review The general  features or characteristics of  the articles reviewed during  this phase are discussed briefly  below.  Findings from review of bibliographic materials related to the state‐of‐the‐practice as it pertains  to equity and environmental  justice  considerations  in  toll  implementation and  rate  changes are  then  summarized.    The documents  that were part of  this  review  are  shown  in  Table  1  along with  a brief  summary  of  findings  after  the  table.    The  individual  literature  review  summaries  are  included  in  Appendix A.    3.1.2.1  Audience    For the state‐of‐the‐practice literature review scan, the Research Team examined resource documents,  policy research, and research papers that were targeted to a range of audiences, including practitioners,  academics, policy and advocacy researchers, policy makers, and the general public.  Most of the equity  and pricing papers were targeted to academic and practitioner audiences.    3.1.2.2  Focus Areas    Several  focus  areas  identified  as  relevant  throughout  the Guidebook  and Toolbox  and  to  the  agency  decisionmakers  and  practitioners  who  work  at  the  nexus  of  environmental  justice  and  toll  implementation were identified to broadly classify papers and articles.  These focus areas included: data  requirements and trends; tolling and pricing scenarios and collection technologies; analysis methods and  impact measures; public engagement approaches and methods; mitigation and compensation; and legal  and  regulatory context.   Papers,  reports, and policy  resource documents  reviewed  in  this phase were  then  categorized  by  whether  these  focus  areas  were  featured  themes  or  topics  of  the  reviewed  material.    .

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 8  Table 1. Summary Table of Literature Reviewed       P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  EQUITY AND PRICING  Abdelwahab, H.T and M.A.  Abdel‐Aty. 2002. "Artificial  Neural Networks and Logit  Models for Traffic Safety  Analysis of Toll Plazas."  Transportation Research Record:  Journal of the Transportation  Research Board, No. 1784,  Transportation Research Board  of the National Academies,  Washington, D.C., pp. 115.    X          X                    X                         X Central Florida  /Orlando, FL  MSA  Low: Operations focus on toll plaza  movements and traffic safety have  limited relevance for the scope of the  guidebook. While age and females are  among the socioeconomic  characteristics examined, the income  level of drivers are not directly  analyzed.  Altschuler, A. 2013. "Equity as a  Factor in Surface Transportation  Politics." Access: the Magazine  of the University of California  Transportation Center, No. 42,  Spring 2013, pp. 2‐9.  X  X  X  X    X      X X   X X               X       X  X         National ‐  Managed Lanes  Medium: The challenges integrating  redistributive equity in transportation  policies and plans are discussed as well  as framing transportation equity  debates in the U.S. context with an  emphasis on congestion pricing and  high‐occupancy tolling (HOT) lanes. The  study does not speak to methods to  assess EJ and equity impacts.  Bonsall, P., and C. Kelly. 2005.  "Road User Charging and Social  Exclusion: The Impact of  Congestion Charges on At‐Risk  Groups." Transport Policy, Vol.  12, No. 5, pp. 406–18.  X  X      X        X             X     X X     X X    X         City of Leeds,  UK (Yorkshire  County,  Northern  England)  Medium: Describes how road‐charges  affect “at‐risk” individuals and how  particular policies may affect them.  Applies Popgen‐T, an innovative model,  to synthesize a population which can  then be examined as if it were a survey  conducted among specified  subpopulations. It highlights how  impacts on at‐risk groups differ  depending on location, extent, and  basis of the charge area. Popgen‐T  provides a tool through which policies  can be weighed against each other, and  differences can be quantified. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 9      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Buckeye, K. R., and L. W.  Munnich, Jr. 2004. "Value Pricing  Outreach and Education: Key  Steps in Reaching High‐ Occupancy Toll Lane Consensus  in Minnesota." Transportation  Research Record: Journal of the  Transportation Research Board,  No. 1864, Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 16–21.  X  X            X       X     X   X   X   X           X X     I‐394 HOT Lane  Minneapolis,  Minnesota  High: The paper identifies lessons  learned in the outreach and education  efforts employed on the project. The  paper suggests the importance of  transparency in engagement and  outreach processes, showing both its  ups and downs. The I‐394 contains  significant documentation for case  study and effective practices research.  Buckeye, K. R., and L. W.  Munnich, Jr. 2006. "Value Pricing  Education and Outreach Model:  I‐394 MnPASS Community Task  Force." Transportation Research  Record: Journal of  Transportation Research Board,  No. 1960, Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 80–86.  X  X            X       X     X   X   X               X X     I‐394 HOT Lane  Minneapolis,  Minnesota  High: The role of community task forces  is highlighted. While low‐income people  were included in the five focus groups,  there was no discussion of the  race/ethnicity of the attendance or the  task force members. The I‐394 project  contains significant documentation for  case study and effective practices  research.  Burris, M. W., and R. L. Hannay.  2003. "Equity Analysis of the  Houston, Texas, QuickRide  Project." Transportation  Research Record: Journal of the  Transportation Research Board,  No. 1859, Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 87‐92.  X  X      X  X  X          X   X         X   X         X       X Houston, TX ‐  Quick Ride  High: Post‐implementation equity  assessment of HOT lanes, drawing upon  usage and survey data. Usage of the  HOT lane is the same for the QuickRide  program participants irrespective of  their income, but it also found that  lower‐income individuals are less likely  to participate in the program. Overall, it  may be inferred that low‐income  individuals could be less likely to use  HOT lanes. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 10      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Burt, M., Sowell, G., Crawford J,  and T. Carlson. 2010. Synthesis  of Congestion Pricing‐Related  Environmental Impact Analyses ‐  Final Report. Prepared for the  Federal Highway Administration.  X        X    X            X   X X     X X X             X X X Eight case  studies  presented  including, USA:  Portland,  Atlanta,  Seattle,  Minneapolis,  and San Diego;  and World:  Stockholm,  London, and  Singapore  High: Summarizes state‐of‐the‐practice  and presents a recommended  framework for before and after  evaluations of the environmental  impacts including equity of congestion  pricing projects, such as HOT lanes and  cordon or area pricing schemes.  Suggests gaps and best practices.  Campbell, M., Spitz, G.,  Carpenter, C., Ramchal, K.,  Jacobs, D. 2011. "The Effect of  Improved Replenishment  Options to Convert Cash Users  to Electronic Toll Collection."  Paper of TRB 2011 Annual  Meeting.  X  X  X      X                      X   X X     X X            X NYC MTA East  River Crossings  High: Describes the stated preference  survey methods used to target cash  customers with objective of mitigating  potential impacts of transition to all‐ electronic tolling for low‐income cash  users. Suggests effective practice  methods and issues for low‐income  travelers.  Coyle, D., Robinson, F., Zhao, Z.,  Munnich, L., Lari, A. 2011. From  Fuel Taxes to Mileage‐Based  User Fees: Rationale,  Technology, and Transitional  Issues. Intelligent Transportation  Systems Institute Center for  Transportation Studies at  University of Minnesota,  Minneapolis, Minnesota.  X  X  X    X  X  X      X X       X       X   X X     X  X         N/A  Low: Technical report to compare fuel  taxes to forms of mileage‐based user  fees. Most arguments in favor of fuel  taxes as equitable and efficient means  for funding transportation  infrastructure are countered.  Emphasizes importance of linking  revenues from congestion pricing to  strategies to lessen regressivity of  mileage‐based user fees with transit  improvements and or  discounts/exemptions for lower‐income  groups. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 11  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  DKS Associates, with PBSJ & Jack  Faucett. 2009. A Domestic Scan  of Congestion Pricing and  Managed Lanes. Prepared for  the Federal Highway  Administration.  X  X  X  X  X   X X X X X U.S. and Large  Urban Areas ‐  Managed Lanes  Medium: Good state‐of‐the‐practice  review on how regions were introducing  congestion tolling and managed lanes  to address congestion (or revenue  generation). Helpful information  provided on how that process was  incorporated into the regional  transportation planning process. While  pointing to projects that may be useful  to look at from an EJ perspective, the  report did not provide many insights or  information on that topic itself.  Ecola, L., and T. Light. 2009.  Equity and Congestion Pricing: A  Review of the Evidence. Rand  Corporation, Santa Monica, CA.  X  X  X  X  X X X X X X X X X X X  X X International  and national  project  examples  High: Good resource for understanding  different types of equity analysis. It  provides useful insights on  considerations for evaluating equity  impacts for several congestion pricing  strategies as well as mitigation  strategies to alleviate regressive  taxation concerns.  Goldman, T., and M. Wachs.  2003. "A Quiet Revolution in  Transportation Finance: The Rise  of Local Option Transportation  Taxes." Transportation  Quarterly, 57(1), pp. 19‐32.  X  X  X  X  X X  X National and Local  Low: Paper examines the rise of local  taxes to fund transportation  investments. Many local option taxes  are decoupled from the use of  transportation resources, a departure  from traditional funding mechanisms  (e.g., gas tax, tolls). The review is  exhaustive, but more than a decade old. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 12      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Geddes, R. Richard & Nentchev,  Dimitar N., 2013. Private  Investment and Road Pricing:  The Publicization of  Infrastructure Assets.    X        X        X X                   X       X  X         N/A  Low: Introduces concept of an  “investment public‐private partnership”  through which the state, by maximizing  the initial leasing cost, could create a  public trust that could be capitalized to  return dividends to the public. The cost  of pricing could be phased in to reduce  the initial costs to the driving public, but  would have to eventually reflect the  cost recovery and profit associated with  the leasing arrangement. By unlocking  the value in sunk public costs the  resulting income stream could pay for  improvements, but would also yield a  permanent trust fund to be paid out to  the people with a special emphasis on  the poor. It recognizes that the transfer  of control would necessitate some form  of tolling system; the design of the toll  would be structured to reduce political  resistance and part of that political  support would come from the public  trust fund pay out.  Gulipalli, P. K., and K. M.  Kockelman. 2008. "Credit‐Based  Congestion Pricing: A Dallas‐Fort  Worth Application." Transport  Policy, 15(1), pp. 23‐32.  X  X          X    X       X   X       X X X         X X       Dallas‐Ft.  Worth, TX  Region  Medium: Shows how a credit‐based  element could be integrated into a  congestion pricing scheme to permit all  regional drivers at least some free  access to the tolled network. However,  the article does not discuss the  implications of the credit program in  depth. Modeling methods used show  how people living in different parts of a  region will be impacted differently.  Authors acknowledge that one option  to compensate for this regional inequity  could be to allocate higher credits to  residents in some sub‐regions, but do  not discuss in any depth differential  impacts by sociodemographic factors. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 13      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Halvorson, R., and K. R. Buckeye.  2006. "High‐Occupancy Toll Lane  Innovations: I‐394 MnPASS."  Public Works Management &  Policy, 10(3), pp. 242‐255.  X  X    X    X    X       X     X       X           X    X X     I‐394 HOT Lane  Minneapolis‐St.  Paul,  Minnesota  Low: The study evaluates the MnPASS  program with some performance‐ related information immediately after  its implementation. Performance is  measured mostly in terms of revenue  and traffic. No equity assessment is  provided. Program was established with  the intent to spend a part of the excess  revenue to improve bus service in the  corridor. It does not indicate what  proportion of the excess revenue would  be spent on bus service improvements.  As with other articles on I‐394, contains  information for case study research.  Higgins, T., Bhatt, K., and A.  Mahendra. 2010. Road Pricing  Communication Practices.  American Association of State  Highway and Transportation  Officials, Washington, D.C.  X  X            X     X X X           X             X         Value Pricing  Pilot Program  (VPPP) and  Urban  Partnership  Agreement  (UPA)  Congestion  Reduction  Demonstration  (CRD),  including NYC,  Dallas,  Portland,  Minneapolis,  Washington,  D.C.  Medium: Reviews and synthesizes  literature on the acceptability of road  pricing, highlighting communications  and engagement strategies most likely  to bring acceptance, adoption, and  successful implementation. Provides  resource links for further information  and follow up. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 14      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Hobson, J. and C. Cabansagan.  2013. Moving People, Not Just  Cars: Ensuring Choice, Equity,  and Innovation in MTC’s Express  Lane Network. TransForm,  Oakland, CA.  X    X  X    X  X    X     X                 X X X X    X         San Francisco  Bay Area  Region ‐  Express Lane  System  Medium: Advocacy organization argues  that a different approach is warranted  for the proposed Bay Area Express Lane  System ‐‐ namely, using Optimize‐A‐ Lanes vs. traditional HOT Lanes and  implementing other forms of non‐solo  travel. The alternative and mitigation  strategies outlined, they argue, will  have more positive effects not only for  the traditionally disadvantaged  populations, but also the environment.  King, D., Manville, M., and D.  Shoup. 2007. "The Political  Calculus of Congestion Pricing."  Transport Policy, 14(2), pp. 111‐ 123.  X  X  X      X    X X   X X X X   X     X   X   X     X         Los Angeles  Metropolitan  Region; Other  Regions  Low: Referencing political and economic  behavior theory, paper examines why  feasible and socially beneficial  congestion pricing projects do not get  implemented. In particular, it  demonstrates how toll revenue could  be used as very powerful incentive to  gain political support for pricing  projects. Los Angeles County is used as  a model to demonstrate that  traditionally disadvantaged populations  would benefit if revenues are  distributed on a per capita basis to  communities proximate to the tolling  facility. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 15      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Kockelman, K. M., and S.  Kalmanje. 2005. "Credit‐Based  Congestion Pricing: A Policy  Proposal And The Public’s  Response." Transportation  Research Part A: Policy and  Practice, 39(7), pp. 671‐690.  X  X            X X   X   X X         X X X   X X    X         Austin, TX  Metropolitan  Region  Medium: Describes rationale for Credit‐ Based Congestion Pricing (CBCP) and  findings of CBCP survey designed to  examine limitations on traveler choices  (such as work times and child care  locations), public support for and  perception of CBCP and other  transportation policies, and behavioral  response to such policies. Public  reaction to credit‐based congestion  pricing program is explored, looking at  how results vary by different  populations of concern in equity  analysis such as low‐income families  and families with children. Contains  information on potential mitigation  strategy tool.  Kockelman, K. M., and J. D.  Lemp. 2011. "Anticipating New‐ Highway Impacts: Opportunities  for Welfare Analysis and Credit‐ Based Congestion Pricing."  Transportation Research Part A:  Policy and Practice, Vol. 45, No.  8, pp. 825‐838.    X          X    X   X               X           X  X         Not Specified  Low: The study examines the  congestion and revenue‐generation  impacts of congestion pricing as a  method of financing new highways. It  uses a nested logit model that includes  mode and destination choice. The  model results indicate that congestion  pricing in most cases can generate a  substantial amount of revenue to pay  for the costs of new highways. The  authors contend that even after paying  for the costs of roadway construction  and maintenance, excess revenue may  remain from tolled facilities to  distribute among eligible travelers. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 16  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Lari, A. 2010. Study of Public  Acceptance of Tolling with New  Capacity and Credits: Concepts  of FAST Miles and FEE Lanes.  X  X  X  X X X X X X X X Minneapolis(MN)  Medium: Research examines policies,  conditions, design and operational  characteristics that could satisfy public  concerns exploring use of shoulders and  operational improvements to optional  toll lanes (FEE). Focus group and  research also examined credit options  to use FEE Lanes (Fast & Intertwined  Regular Lanes [FAIR]). Included helpful  literature review on traffic management  and credits for tolling and public  acceptability challenges including equity  concerns.  Levinson, D. 2010. "Equity  Effects of Road Pricing: A  Review." Transport Reviews,  30(1), pp. 33‐57.  X  X  X X X X X X X X X X X X X  X  X Not Specified  High: Provides a very thorough review  of empirical studies on tolling and  pricing. The theoretical aspects are also  informative, covering a substantial body  of literature on equity and justice in a  transportation economics context. The  author makes clear the complexity of  various types of road pricing strategies,  the differing definitions of equity, and  alternative assumptions about revenue  recycling. Equity issues are addressable,  the author concludes, presenting  findings of empirical and simulation  studies of road pricing effects and  suggested remedies for real or  perceived inequities. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 17  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Litman, T., and M. Brenman.  2012. A New Social Equity  Agenda for Sustainable  Transportation. Victoria  Transport Policy Institute,  Victoria, BC, Canada.  X  X  X  X X X X X X  X  X X Not Specified  Medium: The definitions and  approaches for EJ are too narrow, the  authors argue, and warrant a social  equity framework. Article distills  literature and broadly examines  demographics of commuting travel  behavior for various disadvantaged  populations, comparing favorably the  broader scope of considerations under  a social equity agenda with its embrace  of sustainable transportation.  Specifically, the authors argue that low‐ income groups can benefit from tolling  because they are not inclined to use toll  roads and toll roads improve bus travel  speeds and generate revenue which can  be used to support transit.  Madi, M., Wiegmann, J.,  Parkany, E., Swisher, M., Symon,  J. 2013. Guidebook for State,  Regional, and Local  Governments on Addressing  Potential Equity Impacts of Road  Pricing. FHWA‐HOP‐13‐033.  Federal Highway Administration,  U.S. Department of  Transportation, Washington,  D.C.  X  X  X  X  X  X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X National, State,  Regional, and  Local  Perspectives  High: Offers valuable definitions on  equity and comprehensive procedures  and guidance to state, regional, and  local agencies, as well as  decisionmakers and concerned citizens  to follow when considering road pricing  projects to ensure that equity issues are  communicated, evaluated, and  addressed. Includes technical discussion  on how to conduct an EJ analysis and a  project level analysis of toll roads in an  EIS. The communications section could  have focused more directly on “how to  talk about pricing projects” in  relationship to underserved  populations. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 18      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Mahendra, A., Grant, M.,  Higgins, T., and K. Bhatt. 2011.  NCHRP Report 686: Road Pricing:  Public Perceptions and Program  Development. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X    X          X     X X X X X X X X X   X X     X    X X X   Interviews with  network and  facility pricing  projects,  including metro  areas in: San  Francisco,  Minnesota,  Washington  State, Los  Angeles,  Virginia, Dallas,  and  Washington,  D.C., among  others.  Medium: Guidebook on pricing  communications summarizes a great  deal of content, but in a somewhat  cursory fashion at it relates to equity  and EJ. Equity concerns as expressed  through interviews and research on the  subject pricing projects and how various  equity issues were raised and addressed  by various agencies through outreach,  analysis, mitigation, and monitoring.  Equity is broadly defined (e.g., income,  modal user, spatial, market, fiscal) and  quite abbreviated.  Parkany, E. 2005. Environmental  Justice Issues Related to  Transponder Ownership and  Road Pricing. Transportation  Research Record: Journal of the  Transportation Research Board,  No. 1932(1), Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 97‐108.  X  X      X  X  X                      X     X   X X      X       Puerto Rico   and other  locations  High: Identifies barriers to transponder  usage, arguing that the ability to access  toll roads with electronic pricing  depends on the ability to access a  transponder, not just the ability to pay  the tolls. Large transponder deposits,  initial prepayment amounts, and use of  credit cards are required by many toll  agencies, putting transponder usage  outside the reach of a large percentage  of the U.S. population. In modeling  application, results showed that higher‐ income households are more likely to  have transponders and to use toll roads  frequently. The Puerto Rico card‐based  system where funds can be added at  convenience locations provides a  solution for toll road access where large  proportions of the population have no  bank account. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 19      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Parsons Brinckerhoff and others.  2013. Improving Our  Understanding of How Highway  Congestion and Pricing Affect  Travel Demand. SHRP Report S2‐ C04‐RW‐1. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X  X      X  X  X        X X X           X X X   X     X         Seattle and all  U.S.  metropolitan  areas  High: The study has useful discussions  on willingness to pay toll by different  income groups. The modeling effort is  particularly noteworthy because of the  use of experimental revealed  preference data. It provides  recommendations for modeling and  policy regarding equity impacts of tolls.  However, the special type of data used  by the study will perhaps not be  available in most places to conduct  equity analysis.  Patterson, T., and D. Levinson.  2008. Lexus Lanes or Corolla  Lanes? Spatial Use and Equity  Patterns on the I‐394 MnPASS  Lanes. Unpublished manuscript,  Department of Civil Engineering,  University of Minnesota.  X  X      X    X          X     X       X   X   X     X       X Minneapolis,  Minnesota and  the Upper  Midwest  Medium: The authors take on the  common criticism that lower use of  managed‐price lanes by low‐income  residents is due to inequity. They  evaluate the possibility that these lanes  are used less by low‐income residents  because they tend to be located in  higher‐income areas. The researchers  find that location and income both  explain HOT lane use. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 20      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Perez, B. G., Betac, T., and P.  Vovsha. 2012. NCHRP Report  722: Assessing Highway Tolling  and Pricing Options and Impacts:  Volume 1: Decision‐Making  Framework. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X          X  X  X     X X X X X   X X X   X X X     X X X X X U.S.,  Harris  County (TX),  Minnesota,  Oregon, San  Diego, Virginia  Medium: Seeks to generalize the  decision‐making processes involved in  implementing tolling/pricing projects.  The report's treatment of equity and EJ  is relatively limited, although equity  principles of fairness and effective  practices are given:   •Income equity analysis is improved  when travel demand models are refined  to support income segmentation (three  to four income groups) in the trip  generation, trip distribution, and mode  choice models, allowing travel impacts  to be distinguished for each group.  Mode choice decisions should reflect  differences by income groups to  determine to what extent lower‐income  populations might be unduly affected  by certain pricing concepts. Potential  strategies to modify the pricing  alternatives to mitigate their possible  impact to lower‐income populations  should be identified.   •Low‐income populations without free  route alternatives should be provided  with improved transit service (improved  by means of toll revenue) or discounted  toll rates.   •Barriers to the acquisition of  transponders and toll accounts for low‐ income people should be eliminated.  •Willingness to pay as a selection  criterion represents a problem since it  creates an income bias in the highway  system development. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 21      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Perez, B. G., Giordano, R., and H.  Stamm. 2011. NCHRP Report  694: Evaluation and  Performance Measurement of  Congestion Pricing Projects.  Transportation Research Board  of the National Academies,  Washington, D.C.  X        X  X  X  X     X X X X X X X   X X X   X     X X     X U.S.: Seattle,  Orange County,  San Diego,  Denver,  Houston,  Miami, NY‐NJ  Region,  Minneapolis;  World:  Singapore,  Toronto,  Central  London,  Stockholm  Low: The guidebook does not provide  much information in terms of equity‐ related measures; however, it does  provide a list of performance  measurement categories based on the  synthesis of 12 case studies. Only 6 of  the 12 have measures that relate to  considerations that could be used to  track equity‐related outcomes. These  measurement categories could inform  the development of an equity audit  framework for practitioners.  Perez, B.G., Fuhs, C., Gants, G.,  Giordano, R., Ungemah, D. 2012.  Price Managed Lane Guide.  Federal Highway Administration,  U.S. Department of  Transportation, Washington,  D.C.  X          X    X       X X X X   X X     X X       X X X X X National ‐  21   Managed Lane  Projects  that  are operational  or planned for  in the U.S.  Medium: Useful primer on the key steps  needed to plan, implement, and  operate priced managed lanes with up‐ to‐date information and examples on all  priced managed lanes in the U.S.  Helpful to transportation professionals  and other stakeholders as to elements,  challenges, and opportunities of priced  managed lanes. Not much useful  information on equity and EJ methods  or involvement processes. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 22      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Peters, J. R., and J. K. Kramer.  2012. Just Who Should Pay for  What? Vertical Equity, Transit  Subsidy, and Road Pricing: The  Case of New York City. Journal of  Public Transportation, 15(2), pp.  117‐136.  X  X      X    X            X     X     X   X         X X     X New York City  Region  Medium: Provides replicable approach  for researching equity issues, using  Lorenz curve and Gini Coefficient  methods. However, the method  requires having data that may be  expensive to collect. Recognizes that  vertical equity issues are not just about  the very poor, affecting middle‐income  families living outside the cordon area.  It focuses on the need to consider  “geographic equity”: how people of  similar incomes may benefit/lose from  tolling depending on where they are  located. Under the scenario studied, the  authors conclude that people who  would benefit from transit  improvements from revenue recycling  would not be the same people paying  the tolls. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 23  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Plotnick, R. D., Romich, J. L., and  J. Thacker. 2009. The Impact of  Tolling on Low‐Income Persons  in the Puget Sound Region.  Institute for Research on  Poverty, University of  Washington, Seattle.  X  X  X  X  X  X  X X X X X X X X X X X Pacific  Northwest,  Washington  State, and  Puget Sound  Region  Medium: Improves the understanding  of the impact of tolling on low‐income  communities in the state of  Washington. Data from SR 671, the  Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Highway 520,  and all tolling systems in the state were  included in the study. Their research  found that most poor households would  not be substantially affected by tolling,  however those who do not have better  alternative routes will show a significant  decrease in their economic well‐being.  The question of whether tolls  disproportionately affect lower‐income  commuters in comparison to higher‐ income commuters has yet to be fully  addressed, as each region differs. By  comparing region, income, and usage,  the authors are able to give a multi‐ dimensional analysis. A method that  could be replicable in other regions or  states. The limitations of the method  are also acknowledged.  Plotnick, R.D., Romich, J.L.,  Thacker, J., and M. Dunbar.  2011. A Geography‐Specific  Approach to Estimating the  Distributional Impact of Highway  Tolls: An Application to the  Puget Sound Region of  Washington State. Journal of  Urban Affairs, Volume 33,  Number 3, pp. 345–366.  X  X  X  X  X X X X Seattle and  Puget Sound  Region  High: An examination of the social  distribution of the financial costs or  household cost burden of various  hypothetical tolling scenarios for low‐ income travelers. Uses the Household  Activity Survey (HAS) for Puget Sound in  Washington to assess the money‐cost of  the journey to work under the  hypothetical tolling scenarios.  Limitations of the method with respect  to price‐induced behavior changes (e.g.,  mode shift, time of day shift) are  acknowledged. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 24      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Ray, R., Petrella, M., Peirce, S., et  al. 2014. Exploring the Equity  Impacts of Two Road Pricing  Implementations Using a  Traveler Behavior Panel Survey.  Report prepared for the Federal  Highway Administration. Volpe  National Transportation System  Center, Cambridge, M.A.  X    X      X  X          X             X X X   X     X       X Seattle Metro  Region &  Atlanta Region  High: The report used one of the most  appropriate methods of data collection.  The technique cannot be used to  evaluate a yet to be implemented toll.  However, the study can be referenced  to monitor performance and determine  if tolling in fact affects low‐income  individuals even though pre‐ implementation surveys may not show  that.  Schweitzer, L., and B. D. Taylor.  2008. Just Pricing: The  Distributional Effects of  Congestion Pricing and Sales  Taxes. Transportation, 35(6), pp.  797‐812.  X  X  X            X     X X         X X   X         X X       Orange County,  California  Medium: Provides an analytical  evaluation of the burden on low‐income  households from sales taxes and other  alternative taxes for transportation  funding. Examines the question of  tolling incidence and transportation  funding in a comparative context and  concludes that tolls are less regressive  method for low‐income users than the  alternatives.  Schweitzer, L. 2009. The  Empirical Research on the Social  Equity of Gas Taxes, Emissions  Fees, and Congestion Charges.  Transportation Research Board  Special Report, Issue 303, p. 29.  X  X  X                                X X X X X   X  X         No specific  area  Medium: Suggests potential utility of  "pop‐gen" ‐ a "Monte‐Carlo" simulation  method ‐‐ to sample particular  population characteristics (e.g., age,  disability, ethnicity, language).  Simulated “travelers” from each zone  are assigned likely links, including the  priced roadways, via algorithm. Method  offers a more in‐depth analysis of  population strata, while eliminating the  standard problem of small‐number and  small area statistics. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 25      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Southern Environmental Law  Center. 2013. A Highway for All?  Economic Use Patterns for  Atlanta's HOT Lanes.  X    X  X  X    X    X     X   X     X   X X X X       X X   X X Atlanta  Metropolitan  Region  Medium: Advocacy‐based study in the  Atlanta metro area that compares  transaction data for the I‐85 HOT lanes  in an attempt to determine whether a  relationship exists between toll lane use  and the economic profile of the toll lane  users. Finds that an overall positive  relationship exists between a ZIP code's  median income and the frequency of  toll lane use, but acknowledges its  methodological limitations. Urges  Federal and state agencies to follow  through with their post‐implementation  monitoring commitment and  recommends mitigation strategies for  low‐income individuals (e.g., transit,  credits).  Spitz, G., and D. Jacobs. 2006.  "How to Do an Origin &  Destination Survey in a Cash‐ and‐Electronic Toll Collection  Environment." Tollways: Journal  of the International Bridge,  Tunnel, and Turnpike  Association, Vol. 3, No. 1., pp.  65‐75.  X  X      X  X                      X     X X   X     X         New York / NYC  MTA  Medium: Presents methodology to  survey cash customers at toll plazas,  and E‐ZPass customers through the mail  on the same day. The interagency  cooperation allowed the Bridge and  Tunnel agency to obtain travel  information yet protect the privacy of  the E‐ZPass customers at the same  time. Bridges and Tunnels learned from  their O&D survey that cash customers  and ETC customers have very different  characteristics.  Swan, P.F., and M.H. Belzer.  2010. "Empirical Evidence of Toll  Road Traffic Diversion and  Implications for Highway  Infrastructure Privatization."  Public Works Management and  Policy, Vol. 14., No. 4, pp. 351‐ 373.    X          X        X               X             X         Ohio Turnpike  Low: Research on elasticity of truck  demand diversion and policy  implications. Trucking diversion to  untolled roads can have implications for  general public welfare and community  quality of life and safety to untolled  roads. There is no explicit treatment of  EJ or equity. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 26      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Taylor, B. D., and R. Kalauskas.  2010. Addressing Equity in  Political Debates over Road  Pricing. Transportation Research  Record: Journal of the  Transportation Research Board,  No. 2187, Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 44‐52.  X  X            X       X       X     X   X       X  X   X     Minneapolis,  NYC, and Los  Angeles  Medium: Highly readable literature  review on the treatment of equity,  including the authors’ prior research on  the relative progressivity of tolls vis‐à‐ vis other transportation funding  mechanisms. Presents case studies with  shrewd observations about opposition  on equity grounds and what it may take  to build support for tolling projects.  Strategies are put forward to overcome  political opposition, providing some  valuable broad points and select ideal  examples. Offers broad strategies for  successful public engagement in the  implementation of HOT lanes by  involving interest groups and advocates  in the planning process, but would  require more development for guidance  document.  Texas Transportation Institute,  in association with Cambridge  Systematics, Inc., 2006.  Washington State  Comprehensive Tolling Study,  Final Report – Volume 2,  Background Paper #4: Equity,  Fairness, and Uniformity in  Tolling. Report for the  Washington State  Transportation Commission.  X    X        X  X   X X X X X X X X X X   X X     X  X X   X   Washington  State, Denver,  Alameda and  Contra Costa  counties (CA);   San Diego (CA),  Minneapolis,  NY State;  Fort  Myers, (FL)  Medium: Provides useful literature  review and summary of principles of  equity: income, geographic,  participation, modal and opportunity.  Provides useful definitions of policy  authorities, definitions of tolling  facilities and references case examples  and "lessons" from prior research on  equity and fairness in tolling. Describes  situations in which toll projects avoid  and cause adverse impacts on low‐ income populations. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 27      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Transportation Research Board:  Committee on Equity  Implications of Evolving  Transportation Finance  Mechanisms. 2011. Equity of  Evolving Transportation Finance  Mechanisms. TRB Special Report  No. 303. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.      X          X     X X X   X X         X       X  X         U.S.  Medium: Explores equity implications of  transportation funding alternatives,  offering an important framework for  equity considerations. Evaluates the  equity issues that arise when  transportation funding alternatives are  being considered. Focuses heavily on  the ability of some groups to pass off  their burdens to other groups. In  considering how to minimize these  adverse impacts, this report evaluates  five aspects of equity, including: (1)  income, (2) geography, (3) mode, (4)  generation, and (5) ethnicity. Each of  these aspects should be evaluated to  avoid disproportionate societal impacts.  Ungemah, David. 2007. “This  Land is Your Land, This Land is  My Land: Addressing Equity and  Fairness in Tolling and Pricing.”  Transportation Research Record:  Journal of the Transportation  Research Board, No. 2013, pp  13‐20. Transportation Research  Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X    X        X      X X X X           X   X X       X X   X   Washington  State, Denver,  Alameda and  Contra Costa  counties (CA);   San Diego (CA),  Minneapolis,  NY State;  Fort  Myers, (FL)  Medium: Briefer summary of  Background Report #4 research for  Washington State Tolling Commission  (see Texas Transportation Institute  report). Emphasizes the limitations of  conventional financing for roads and  other transportation services and that  tolls produce benefits so it cannot be  assumed that EJ communities will  always oppose toll proposals. The  author suggests that income equity  issues can more easily be mitigated or  alleviated than geographic equity,  fulfilling the requirements of EJ.  Ultimately, no project needs to be  delayed or tabled because of equity  issues. Identifying concerns and  addressing them through deliberate and  transparent policy and action can  advance the case for tolls in a broad  transportation financing and planning  context. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 28      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  United States Government  Accountability Office. 2012.  Traffic Congestion: Road Pricing  Can Help Reduce Congestion,  but Equity Concerns May Grow.  Government Accountability  Office (GAO) Report 12‐119.      X  X      X    X X   X X X X       X   X       X  X X X X X U.S. (All VPP,  Express Lanes  Demonstration  [ELD], and HOV  facilities in the  U.S.)  Medium: Relatively recent report by  GAO to U.S. Congress that examines the  revenue and equity implications of the  federally based VPPP, the ELD, and High  Occupancy Vehicle Lane (HOV or HOT)  facilities under ISTEA and SAFETEA‐LU.  U.S. Federal Highway  Administration. 2008. Income‐ based Equity Impacts of  Congestion Pricing – A Primer.  FHWA‐HOP‐08‐040. Federal  Highway Administration, U.S.  Department of Transportation,  Washington, D.C.  X    X  X  X    X          X X X   X     X   X   X     X X   X X VPPP &  UPA/CRD  Projects  High: Equity primer examines the  impacts of congestion pricing on low‐ income groups, public opinion as  expressed by various income groups,  and ways to mitigate the equity impacts  of congestion pricing. Often quoted  resource, making argument that lanes  are used by all populations. Could  provide more information on how  access is examined for unbanked and  low‐income users – transponders, use  of cash, credit or debit card, and  locations of places where these are  available.  Weinstein, A., and G. C. Sciara.  2006. Unraveling Equity in HOT  Lane Planning: A View from  Practice. Journal of Planning  Education and Research, 26(2),  pp. 174‐184.  X  X          X  X     X X X X X       X   X   X     X   X X   Eleven HOT  Lane and  Variable Pricing  Projects in the  U.S.  Medium: Rather than assess definitively  whether HOT lanes are equitable, the  objective was to investigate how equity  has been perceived in the context of  HOT lanes and how practitioners have  handled equity concerns. The article  found that missing from the burgeoning  literature on HOT lanes was an  assessment of how practitioners have  wrestled with the equity question in  their daily HOT lane planning and  project experience. At the time of its  writing, empirical research on how  equity concerns have played out in  actual project planning was missing  from the literature and through their  research the authors sought to address  this gap. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 29  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Zmud, J., and C. Arce. 2008.  NCHRP Synthesis Report 377:  Compilation of Public Opinion  Data on Tolls and Road Pricing.  Transportation Research Board  of the National Academies,  Washington, D.C.  X  X  X  X  X  X X X X X X U.S.  Medium: A relatively current and  comprehensive investigation of over  100 tolling‐related public opinion polls.  The document provides valuable  insights on the public’s opinion on most  of the major types of tolling and is an  outstanding resource for organizations  to use as a starting point for planning  and discussions relative to tolling.  DEMOGRAPHICS & CULTURAL TRENDS, PATTERNS, & PERSPECTIVES  Beckman, J. D., and K. G.  Goulias. 2008. Immigration,  Residential Location, Car  Ownership, and Commuting  Behavior: a Multivariate Latent  Class Analysis from California.  Transportation, Vol. 35, Issue 5,  pp. 655‐671.  X  X  X X Select  California  Regions  Low: While the article does not have  anything to do with pricing or tolling, it  emphasizes that immigrants  demonstrate diverse travel patterns  based on age and place characteristics.  The article is only peripherally related  to the current study. However, it can be  cited as an example of studies showing  diversity among immigrants.  Blumenberg, E., and A.  Weinstein. 2010. Getting Around  When You’re Just Getting By:  Transportation Survival  Strategies of the Poor. Paper  presented at TRB 2011 Annual  Meeting.  X  X  X  X  X  X     X X  X San Jose  Region, CA  Medium: Through use of interviews, the  researchers immerse themselves in the  socioeconomic and spatial environment  and circumstances of low‐income  travelers. Offers insights, methods, and  strategies for addressing the challenges  of being a low‐income person when  seeking mobility and access to needed  goods and opportunities – an  appropriate lens when assessing the  effects of road pricing in terms of EJ. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 30  P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Zmud, J., et al. 2014. NCHRP  Report 750: The Effects of Socio‐ Demographics on Future Travel  Demand. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X  X  X  X X U.S. National  Low: Describes the Impacts 2050 toolkit  that allows users to conduct scenario  analysis up to the year 2050 pertaining  to socio‐demographics, travel behavior,  land use, employment, and  transportation supply. The toolkit is  based on a Systems Dynamics (SD)  model and is Excel‐based. The model's  purpose is not so much to forecast long‐ term travel behavior, but to illustrate  different scenarios and their  implications for policy and planning.  The SD model segments a region’s  population by age, household structure,  income, race, ethnicity, culture,  residence location, and area type. The  change of these characteristics over  time results in changes in travel  patterns. The report is not directly  related to tolling, pricing, or equity  assessment of such projects. Hence it is  only peripherally related to the current  study. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 31      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE / TITLE VI, COMMUNITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT & MITIGATION  Cairns, Shannon, Grieg, Jessica,  Wachs, Martin. 2003.  Environmental Justice &  Transportation: A Citizen’s  Handbook University of  California Transportation Center  No. 620  X    X  X        X   X X                     X             X     Medium: Describes the public  participation process and  considerations necessary for good  decisionmaking in the interest of EJ  communities. It defines criteria for  identifying stakeholders and community  needs as well as identifying those places  in the process where the public can  intervene. This implies not just  addressing transportation needs, but  using the available environmental  review tools to push decisionmakers to  consider alternatives they might have  ignored. It outlines the kinds of data  that community groups need to  assemble, how to construct  performance measures, how to identify  diverse needs and how to look behind  the data. Moreover, it suggests when  the proceeds from tolling or other  pricing mechanism ought to be used to  address other EJ needs in addition to  transportation. It discusses metrics, why  a particular plan might be  characterized, and whether the  characterization truly reflects the needs  of the EJ community.  Chakraborty, J. 2006. Evaluating  the Environmental Justice  Impacts of Transportation  Improvement Projects in the  U.S. Transportation Research  Part D: Vol. 11, pp. 315‐323.  X            X      X                       X       X X X X   Volusia County,  FL  & U.S.  Medium: Presents practical method for  evaluating the EJ implications of  transportation projects at an early stage  of project planning or impact  assessment. Describes calculation  method for two indices: a “buffer  comparison index” and an “area  comparison index” that is easy to  replicate, utilizing available census data  and census geographies for race,  ethnicity, and income measures. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 32      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Deka, D. 2004. Social and  Environmental Justice Issues in  Urban Transportation. In Susan  Hanson and Genevieve Giuliano,  eds., Geography of Urban  Transportation (3rd Ed.). New  York: Guilford Press.  X  X  X  X  X    X    X X                     X X X X    X X X X   U.S.  Medium: Points out that the need for  mobility and accessibility has not yet  been widely recognized as a basic need  for advancing social justice, and it has  not yet been fully realized in U.S.  transportation policy. Growing  awareness of it essential importance  alongside such basic needs as food,  shelter, and clothing suggests that it  must be explored in the context of  tolling. Transit examples discussed,  including the idea to charge per mile  versus per trip, and the idea to charge  less during off‐peak hours are  provocative in term of increasing equity  and could prove of relevance in a tolling  context.  Forkenbrock, D. and Sheely, J.  2004. NCHRP Report 532:  Effective Methods for  Environmental Justice  Assessment. Transportation  Research Board, Washington,  D.C.  X  X          X                          X   X         X X X   Area/Regional  Plans and  Projects  High: Provides a useful framework for  evaluating how transportation projects  may affect all aspects of a community’s  quality of life. In tandem with NCHRP  Report, 456, these guides create a  framework for understanding which  types of effects are critical to be  included in different types of tolling  projects. The information in this  guidebook can be used to construct  checklists to inform a practitioner of  which impact they may need to  consider and what methods might be  useful to inform comparisons between  different tolling strategies. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 33      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  Forkenbrock, D. J., and  Weisbrod, G.E., 2001. NCHRP  Report 456: Guidebook for  Assessing the Social and  Economic Effects of  Transportation Projects.  Transportation Research Board  of the National Academies,  Washington, D.C.  X  X          X                          X             X X X   Area/Regional  Plans and  Projects  Medium: Provides a useful framework  for considering a range of social and  economic effects important for a full  analysis of any type of transportation  project including tolling projects.  Resources do not specifically address a  tolling project but methods are  transferable to any type of project.  Prozzi, J., Victoria, I., Torres, G.,  Walton, C. M., Prozzi, J. 2006.  Guidebook for Identifying,  Measuring, and Mitigating  Environmental Justice Impacts of  Toll Roads. Report No. 0‐5208‐ P2. Center for Transportation  Research, University of Texas at  Austin.  X        X    X  X X X X                     X X     X     X   State of Texas  Toll Road  Network(s)  High: The objective of the report is to  “present an approach for the  identification, measurement, and  mitigation of disproportionately high or  adverse impacts imposed on minority  and low‐income (EJ) communities by  toll roads relative to non‐toll roads.”   Highlights general EJ considerations on  highway‐related transportation  improvements as well as specific  considerations related to EJ on toll  implementation projects. The public  involvement section’s presentation of  “public participation techniques” could  be further updated and expanded to  incorporate processes currently in use  for toll‐related studies.  U.S. DOT, FHWA and Texas  Department of Transportation  (TxDOT). 2008. Joint Guidance  for Project and Network Level  Environmental Justice, Regional  Network Land Use, and Air  Quality Analyses for Toll Roads.  X        X    X  X   X X X X X X X X X X X X X X       X   X   State of Texas  Toll Road  Network(s)  High: Provides specific guidance to  practitioners on specific considerations,  data sources, evaluation methods for  assessing evaluations of EJ effects from  tolling projects at the network and  project facility‐specific levels. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 34      P r a c t i t i o n e r s   A c a d e m i c s   P o l i c y   M a k e r s   G e n e r a l   P u b l i c   D a t a   R e q u i r e m e n t s   &   T r e n d s   T o l l i n g   &   P r i c i n g   S c e n a r i o s   /   C o l l e c t i o n   T e c h n o l o g i e s   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   /   I m p a c t   M e a s u r e s   P u b l i c   E n g a g e m e n t   A p p r o a c h e s   &   M e t h o d s   M i t i g a t i o n   &   C o m p e n s a t i o n   L e g a l   &   R e g u l a t o r y   G e n e r a l   P r i c i n g   M a n a g e d   L a n e s   /   H O T   L a n e s   C o n g e s t i o n   P r i c i n g   P e a k   P e r i o d   P r i c i n g   D y n a m i c   P r i c i n g   C o r d o n   P r i c i n g   A l l ‐ E l e c t r o n i c   / E l e c t r o n i c   T o l l   C o l l e c t i o n   ( E T C )     T r a n s p o n d e r   R o a d   P r i c i n g   /   P r i c i n g     R e s p o n s e   R e s e a r c h   M e t h o d s   &   M e t r i c s   E q u i t y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   J u s t i c e   L o w ‐ I n c o m e   F o c u s   S o c i a l   E x c l u s i o n / A c c e s s   t o   O p p o r t u n i t i e s   T r a n s p o r t a t i o n   F u n d i n g   /   P u b l i c   F i n a n c e   P o l i c y   R e s e a r c h   S t a t e w i d e / M e t r o p o l i t a n   P l a n n i n g   P r o j e c t   P l a n n i n g   / F e a s i b i l i t y   P r o j e c t   D e v e l o p m e n t / N E P A   O p e r a t i o n s   Region(s) / Projects  Relevance for Guidebook  PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT & COMMUNICATIONS  Aimen, D., and A. Morris. 2012.  NCHRP Report 710: Practical  Approaches for Involving  Traditionally Underserved  Populations in Transportation  Decisionmaking. Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.  X    X  X  X      X                           X X     X X X X X Nationwide  Medium: Resource document that  describes tools and techniques,  effective practices, and several data  sources to identify the socioeconomic  characteristics of communities,  including traditional underserved  populations. “Practical approaches” are  described for each stage of  decisionmaking, suggesting that  meaningful engagement strategies can  be employed on toll implementation  studies; however, the examples do not  directly illustrate tolling‐related  planning studies and project examples.  McAndrews, C., Florez‐Diaz,  J.M., and E. Deakin. 2006.  "Views of the Street: Using  Community Surveys and Focus  Groups to Inform Context‐ Sensitive Design." Journal of the  Transportation Research Board,  No. 1981, Transportation  Research Board of the National  Academies, Washington, D.C.,  pp. 92–99.  X              X                                   X   X X   San Francisco  Bay Region  Low: Provides a good example of how  the use of surveys and focus groups can  bring additional perspectives to the  planning process. Has definite  implications for tolling projects in which  understanding the impacts of tolling  and potential mitigation strategies can  be understood in part through such  public involvement methods. Article  could have benefited from additional  survey analysis, especially relative to  findings by ethnicity/race and income  variables. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 35  The  reviewed  literature  in  this  phase  tended  to  focus  on  analytical methods  and  impact measures  followed by data requirements and trends.  Tolling‐related issues, pricing, and methods of payment and  collection  issues were explicit or  implicit  in many, but not all, of  the articles  reviewed.   For example,  select  articles  discussed  public  engagement methods  or  communications  strategies.   Mitigation  and  compensation was an  important  theme  in more  than one‐quarter of  the  reviewed articles.   A smaller  subset of the reviewed articles focused more on the legal and regulatory context.    3.1.2.3  Pricing and Tolling Context   The reports reviewed generally consider tolling within the following categories: fixed or flat‐rate tolls on  highways  and  bridges;  variable‐rate  tolls  on  highways  and  bridges;  and  variable  tolls  on  exclusive  facilities within corridors  (express  toll  lanes) or on converted or  shared high‐occupancy vehicle  (HOV)  facilities (HOT lanes/managed lanes).  With a greater mix of the studies focusing on domestic U.S. rather  than international examples, the literature only occasionally touches upon vehicular use pricing – which  may include a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) toll or cordon tolls.  In  the  reviewed  literature,  several  of  the  policy  documents  and  academic  and  practitioner  articles  explored  the effects or  lessons  learned of  individual  toll pricing projects or  sets of projects  that have  been funded or  initiated.   The  literature review contained general discussions of pricing or congestion  pricing more  frequently  than  described  specific  operational  or  equity  considerations  related  to  peak  period  or  dynamic  pricing.    Because  there  are  few  U.S.  examples,  cordon  pricing  when  referenced  addressed international case examples (e.g., Singapore, Stockholm, London) or discussed a failed cordon  pricing initiative in New York City.      Transponder account deposits, account management, and replenishment options that may differentially  impact low‐income populations, particularly underbanked and unbanked populations, were discussed in  a smaller subset of important articles as were differences in pricing for cash or video transactions.  Other  issues or considerations driven by an all‐electronic  tolling environment such as citations and penalties  for unpaid video transactions, leakages and diversions were also discussed.    3.1.2.4  Themes  Road pricing and the traveler response to pricing and the concept of equity were the two most prevalent  recurring themes of the reviewed literature.  Many of the articles referenced “low‐income” populations  as an affected segment of the traveling public, but fewer of the articles, about one‐quarter, invoked the  topic of environmental  justice  in so doing.   Even fewer of the reviewed articles explored the potential  consequences of pricing through the theme or lens of social exclusion or unequal or inadequate access  to places of high opportunity.   Few articles considered the race or ethnicity of the affected traveler or  affected  communities.   Research methods or metrics  and  transportation  funding were  referenced  in  about one‐quarter of the reviewed literature items.    3.1.2.5  Region/Project(s)   Several documents that were reviewed provided descriptions or drew upon examples from the various  federal sponsored pricing programs  (Value Pricing Pilot Program  [VPPP], Express Lanes Demonstration  [ELD], and HOV) initiated since 1991.  The U.S. examples included documents describing projects or case  examples  in  the  regions  of  Orange  County,  CA  (SR‐91);  Minneapolis  (I‐394);  Seattle‐Puget  Sound  (SR520); toll roads  in the state of Texas (Houston, Dallas‐Fort Worth, Austin); and more recent express  lane initiatives in the San Francisco Bay, Los Angeles, and Atlanta regions, among others.   3.1.2.6  Stage of Decisionmaking  A significant majority of the literature reviewed was classified as policy research.  The research focus of  these articles, when associated with a stage of  transportation decisionmaking, were more  likely  to be 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 36  linked to statewide and metropolitan planning than other stages of transportation decisionmaking such  as  pre‐project  planning  or  feasibility,  environmental  review  (national  or  state‐level),  or  operations.   Within  the  literature,  there were  some  examples of  reports  that  reference or  examine  travel  survey  impacts pre‐ and post‐implementation of tolling facilities, but most of the  literature discovered during  this phase did not examine the  impact of changes  in toll rates (i.e.,  increases) on existing facilities and  how these rates affect low‐income or minority population travel behavior.    3.1.3 Observations and Preliminary Findings The  literature  review  reflects  a  sampling  of  the  available  literature  on  equity  and  pricing  and  other  themes potentially relevant to the Guidebook’s development.  It was an early research scan and interim  product,  exploring  the  state‐of‐the‐practice  as  it  relates  to  likely  focus  areas  of  relevance  to  the  development  of  the  Guidebook  and  Toolbox  for  practitioners,  including:  data  sources  and  analytic  methods,  public  involvement  processes,  and  specific  tools  and  techniques  for  more  effectively  undertaking environmental justice analyses when considering toll implementation or rate changes.  The  literature reviewed in this initial stage was used, in part, to characterize the state‐of‐the‐practice, screen  for  innovative or effective practices, and  identify “gaps”  in  the practice –  in advance of  the  interview  stage with  agencies, practitioners,  advocates,  and  subject matter  experts.    Findings  from  the  team’s  content  review of environmental  justice‐related  studies on  tolling and pricing,  such as environmental  impact  studies,  environmental  assessments,  and  other  reports,  are  described  in  Section  3.2  of  the  Research Report.    Observations and  findings  from  the  literature  review are described below with  specific  consideration  given to how the reviewed literature informed the content development of the Guidebook and Toolbox.   3.1.3.1  Establishing the Rationale for the Guidebook and Toolbox  In providing the rationale for the Guidebook, the literature review examined several articles that suggest  why road pricing will become an  increasingly prevalent means for meeting the nation’s transportation  finance and congestion management challenges.  Examples are provided below.    Literature Review Observations  U.S. federal gas tax and many state gas taxes are not tracked to inflation, and the vehicle fleet mix is  changing  to  include higher efficiency vehicles and electric and hybrid vehicles, undermining gas  tax  revenues as a mean for funding transportation infrastructure (Madi et al., 2013).  Congestion on public  roads  is an example of  the  tragedy of  the  commons; drivers overuse  roads and do not consider  the  costs via congestion that driving impose on other commuters (Lari, 2010).     These  solutions  raise  equity  and  environmental  justice  concerns  for  affected  stakeholders,  the  interested public and academia, professional practitioners, and decisionmakers.  While road pricing can  relieve congestion and maximize throughput, it does not address equity concerns (Lari, 2010).  Sales tax  and other  forms of  taxation used  in place of  the gas  tax are regressive, disproportionally  favoring  the  “more affluent at the expense of the impoverished” (Schweitzer and Taylor, 2008).    3.1.3.2  Background Information on Tolling and Pricing Initiatives  In addition  to  laying out  its rationale, the Guidebook and Toolbox present background  information on  the recent history, trends, and features of tolling and pricing initiatives.  Those charged with conducting  an  environmental  justice  assessment  need  to  fully  understand  the  attributes  of  the  proposed  toll  implementation  or  rate  change  action  and  consider  how  they may  affect minority  and  low‐income  populations.    Several planning or  facility‐specific  considerations  should be defined – preferably at an  early phase to encourage a comprehensive and  inclusive assessment,  including type of project, pricing 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 37  structure, payment collection method, alternative routes or modes, and use of net toll revenues, among  other considerations.     The Research Team drew upon background research on these attributes to develop Toolbox elements –  case  examples  and  tools  to  identify  data  sources  and  support  effective  analytical  practices  and  involvement processes.   The research also placed various tolling  initiatives  in a funding, regulatory and  legal context in the Guidebook and Toolbox.    Literature Review Observations  The reviewed  literature  includes useful background  information for understanding the recent history  of congestion pricing  in the U.S., the  legislative authority under which these programs were funded,  and  the  type and  location of  funded pricing projects  initiated  since  the  first U.S.  congestion pricing  project  was  implemented  in  1995  in  Orange  County,  California.    This  background  informed  development  of  sections  of  the  Guidebook  and  its  Toolbox  elements.    The  material  also  included  potential contacts for the interviews that were conducted to advance the analysis and develop the tools  and case examples.    In  an  early  2012  report,  the U.S. Government  Accountability Office  (GAO)  stated  that  Congress  has  authorized  U.S.  DOT  to  approve  tolling,  which  can  include  congestion  pricing,  through  three  DOT  congestion pricing programs and several operational or under construction congestion pricing projects  authorized under each program:    Value  Pricing  Pilot  Program  (VPPP),  authorized  in  the  Transportation  Equity  Act  for  the  21st  Century  in  1998  (and  preceded  by  the  Congestion  Pricing  Pilot  Program  authorized  in  the  Intermodal  Surface  Transportation  Efficiency  Act  of  1991)  is  a  pilot  program  for  local  transportation  programs  to  assess  the  effectiveness  of  different  value  pricing  approaches  to  manage  congestion,  including  tolling  implementation  on  highway  facilities.    U.S.  DOT  was  authorized  to  grant  tolling  authority  to  15  state  and  local  transportation  agencies  for  this  program.  VPPP funds were used at one time or another for all but one of the HOT lane projects  in operation and open to traffic at the time of the GAO report (2012)  and for most peak period  pricing projects in the United States.     Express  Lanes  Demonstration  Program  (ELD),  authorized  in  SAFETEA‐LU  in  2005,  allows  15  demonstration projects  to use  tolling  to manage high  congestion  levels,  reduce  emissions  to  meet  specific  Clean  Air  Act  requirements,  or  finance  additional  Interstate  lanes  to  reduce  congestion.  Tolling authority through this program was granted to five projects— four of which  are  in Dallas‐Ft. Worth, Texas, and the other  in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.   Four of these projects  were under construction at the time of the GAO report.     High Occupancy Vehicle  (HOV)  Facilities  and High Occupancy  Toll  (HOT)  Lanes,  authorized  in  SAFETEA‐LU  in  2005,  permits  states  to  charge  tolls  to  vehicles  that  do  not meet  occupancy  requirements to use an HOV  lane even  if the  lane  is on an Interstate facility.   Eleven of the 12  operational HOT  lane projects as of the GAO report (2012) received tolling authority as part of  the HOV Facilities program or VPPP and its predecessor—the Congestion Pricing Pilot Program.  U.S.  DOT,  GAO  also  noted,  has  provided  funding  support  for  congestion  pricing  through  several  programs  that  involve  tolling—the  Urban  Partnership  Agreement  (UPA)  and  Congestion  Reduction  Demonstration  (CRD)  programs  and  the  VPPP.    Through  the  UPA  and  CRD,  congestion  pricing  as  a  strategy to address congestion problems has been advanced through funding awards from 10 separate  grant programs, with particular emphasis on forming partnerships with major urban areas.  The UPA and  CRD participants have  included:   Seattle, WA; San Francisco, CA; Minneapolis‐St. Paul, MN; Miami‐Ft. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 38  Lauderdale, FL.; Los Angeles, CA; and Atlanta, GA.  The federal government has provided approximately  $800  million  through  grant  programs  to  implement  tolling  as  well  as  transit,  technology,  and  telecommunications strategies  to  reduce congestion.   Funds have been used  to build new HOT  lanes,  convert HOV lanes to HOT lanes, establish electronic tolling systems, and purchase buses for express bus  service on HOT lanes (see Table 2).   U.S. DOT has provided about $100 million, according to GAO, in grants for studies, implementation, and  select  evaluations of  congestion pricing projects  through VPPP  since  it was  established  in  fiscal  year  1998.   Congress also authorized $11 million in fiscal year 2005 and $12 million per year for fiscal years  2006 through 2009 for projects that  involve highway pricing.   About a third of total VPPP grants were  awarded to fund three of the six UPA participants—Seattle  in fiscal year 2007 and Minnesota and San  Francisco in fiscal year 2008.  The GAO report itemizes DOT’s Value Pricing Pilot Program Grants, Fiscal  Years 1999 through 2010.    Federal funding for congestion pricing projects has also come through programs other than the VPPP.   For  example,  federal  credit  assistance  available  under  the  Transportation  Infrastructure  Finance  and  Innovation Act program has been used  to help  finance  construction of HOT  lanes  for  seven projects  including those on I‐495 in Virginia, I‐635/I‐35E in Texas, and I‐595 in Florida.  The Federal Aid Highway  Program provides nearly $40 billion a year to the states  in federal funding, according to the GAO, and  the program has been used to help fund construction of congestion pricing programs.    According  to  the GAO,  by  early  2012  some  19  project  sponsors  had  initiated  41  pricing  projects  on  highways, bridges, and tunnels, including operating projects in Georgia, Utah, Colorado, Maryland, and  New  Jersey  and  multiple  projects  in  California,  Florida,  New  York,  Texas,  Virginia, Minnesota,  and  Washington State.   Of  the 41 pricing projects, 30 were completed and open  to  traffic  in 2012 and 11  HOT lane projects were under construction.  Of the 30 opened projects, 12 were HOT lane projects and  18 were peak period priced  facilities.    In addition,  two of  the 12 HOT  lane projects  in operation were  extending the length of their tolled lanes.    Within  the  reviewed  literature, other NCHRP and FHWA policy  resource  reports supplement  the GAO  report  to make  clear  the  overall  status  of  HOT  Lane  (partial  facility  pricing);  Express  Lane;  and  full  roadway facility pricing projects (DKS, 2009; Burt et al., 2010; Perez et al., 2012).  For example, the 2012  Managed  Lanes  Guide  provides  a  useful  primer  on  the  key  steps  needed  to  plan,  implement,  and  operate priced managed lanes with up‐to‐date information and examples on all priced managed lanes in  the United States.  While helpful to transportation professionals and other stakeholders as to elements,  challenges, and opportunities of priced managed lanes, there is often only limited useful information on  equity and environmental justice in these policy resource reports. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 39  Table 2: Range of Pricing, Operational and Transit Strategies to Reduce Congestion by UPA/CRD Site   Note: Bold are congestion pricing strategies.   Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration.   2010.   Synthesis of Congestion Pricing‐Related  Environmental Impact Analyses.     3.1.3.3  Defining Equity and Environmental Justice   The Guidebook  includes brief discussions of key definitions of equity and environmental  justice.   Toll  implementation seeks to ensure mobility, greater accessibility, and reduce travel times but there can be  unintended consequences.  There are several dimensions of fairness and equity that are typically raised  by public officials and  the public, but  it  is anticipated  that practitioners  responsible  for preparing an  environmental  justice  assessment  will  look  to  the  Guidebook  to  better  understand  the  legal  and  regulatory context and core considerations for identifying and addressing environmental justice.   Literature Review Observations  Equity analysis examines how the costs and benefits of projects are distributed among members of the  society.   Equity explores  the  treatment of persons equally, but what  constitutes equal  treatment  is  very  much  in  dispute  (Madi  et  al.,  2013).    Key  dimensions  of  equity  and  fairness  as  it  relates  to  transportation  and  pricing  are  illuminated  in  the  reviewed  literature  and  are  often  raised  by  practitioners, elected officials, various stakeholders, and  the public  (Altschuler, 2013; Ecola and Light,    UPA/CRD Strategies  Site  MN SF  Sea  Mia  LA Atl Convert HOV lanes to dynamically priced HOT lanes and/or new HOT lanes  X   X  X X Priced dynamic shoulder lanes   X     Variably priced parking and/or loading zones    X      X    Variably priced roadways or bridges (partial cordon)       X        Increase park‐and‐ride capacity (expand existing or add new)  X X  X  X X Expand or enhance bus service   X X  X  X Implement new, or expand existing, Bus Rapid Transit   X      X  X    Transit on special runningways (e.g., contraflow lanes Shoulders)  X   X  New and/or enhanced transit stops/stations  X X  X  X Transit traveler information systems (bus arrival times, parking availability) X  X  X        Transit lane keeping/lane guidance   X     Transit traffic signal priority   X   X  X Arterial street traffic signal improvements to improve transit travel times  X     Ferry service improvements   X  X    Improved transit travel forecasting techniques  X      Pedestrian improvements     X  X “Results Only Work Environment” employer‐based techniques  X     Work to increase use of telecommuting   X X  X  X  Work to increase flexible scheduling   X X  X  Work to increase alternative commute programs, including car and van pools X X  X  X  X X Vehicle infrastructure integration test bed  X      Active traffic management   X X    Regional multimodal traveler information (e.g., 511)  X X  X    Freeway management (ramp meters, travel time signs, enhanced monitoring)  X   X  Enhanced traffic signal operations   X     Parking management system   X      X Integrated electronic payment for parking and transit  X      Automated enforce of HOV and toll violations     X

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 40  2009; Levinson, 2010; Taylor and Kalauskas, 2010; GAO, 2012; Madi et al., 2013; TRB, 2013).  Several key  dimensions of equity and fairness are encountered in these materials, including the following:    Horizontal  equity  is  concerned with  the  equal  treatment  or  distribution  of  impacts  between  distinct individuals and groups that are considered equal in ability or need.  Horizontal equity is  concerned with the extent to which members of the same group are treated equally or the same  –  for example, whether  some people within  the  same  income  group pay  a  larger  amount of  taxes or  fees.   The principle does not consider  the differing endowments,  resources, or other  socioeconomic differences between classes or groups.     Vertical equity or outcome equity, by comparison,  refers  to  the distribution of  impacts across  social groups who differ  in  their ability and need.    In accordance with  the principle of vertical  equity, individuals with less ability and/or more need should bear less of the cost and/or accrue  more of the benefits of a project.  Conversely, those individuals with more ability or lesser need  should  bear more  of  the  cost  and/or  accrue  less  of  the  benefits  of  the  project  (Madi  et  al.,  2013).   How  the  costs  and benefits of  a project  are distributed  across members of different  groups  such as high‐ and  low‐income people  is a vertical equity  consideration.   For example,  whether  all  groups  should  pay  in  proportion  to  their  income  or whether  low‐income  people  should pay proportionally more of  their  income  for  tolls  than high‐income people  is a vertical  equity issue (GAO, 2012).   Market equity, a type of horizontal equity, holds that a price charged to each individual or group  should be directly proportional to the costs imposed and benefits received.  In accordance with  this principle, those who benefit from a project should pay for those benefits.  For example, if a  new lane is built, is the lane paid for by a toll on its users, or by a state sales tax paid in part by  persons who may not use or benefit from the lane (GAO, 2012)?     Opportunity equity requires that costs and benefits are assigned in proportion to the size of the  group  without  regard  to  any  other  group  characteristics.    In  the  case  of  road  pricing,  “opportunity equity means that the costs and benefits of a new transportation project should be  divided proportionately among social groups” (Madi et al., 2013).   In the case of mobility need  and  accessibility,  this  form of equity  is denied when  certain  communities or  groups  stand  to  disproportionately benefit  from  specific actions, or when  specific decision‐making  criteria are  employed such as cost‐recovery that  benefit those with higher‐income status.  For example, the  mobility needs may be greater for population A than population B, but mobility  improvements  are provided disproportionately to population B.  Opportunity equity is disregarded when a low‐ income community’s needs for road  infrastructure go unmet, while a toll road  is  implemented  to serve a high‐income community because it is judged to have cost‐recovery feasibility (Litman,  2005; Cambridge Systematics, 2006).    While acknowledging several other  types of equity  in  the  literature related  to transportation projects,  Madi  et  al.  (2013)  recognizes  that  state  and  local  government  officials will want  to  understand  and  communicate  equity  considerations  in ways  that make  it  easy  to  explain  to  the public.    Toward  this  objective,  they offer a  “Taxonomy of Transportation Equity”  (see Table 3)  in which all discussions of  equity can be defined at the highest level in terms of horizontal equity and vertical equity.       

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 41  Table 3.  Taxonomy of Transportation Equity   Type  Sub‐Type  Description  Horizontal  Opportunity  Groups/individuals of the same ability/need are given  costs/benefits in proportion to their size  Market  Groups/individuals of the same ability/need are charged a  cost in proportion to benefits received   Vertical/Outcome    Groups/individuals of differing ability/need achieve the  same result  Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration.  2013.  Guidebook for State, Regional and Local  Governments on Addressing Potential Equity Impacts of Road Pricing.    As seen  in the text box, Equity Decisions Raised  in the Pricing Literature, the  literature on equity and  fairness spans a great breadth of considerations revealing sometimes conflicting notions of fairness and  justice.   Market equity,  for example, holding  that users bear  the  costs of  their use of  transportation  facilities  and  services, may  not  be  reconcilable with  fair  treatment  of  different  classes  (i.e.,  vertical  equity or “income equity”).  Depending on how costs would shift, the most vulnerable or disadvantaged  populations may require subsidies or other forms of mitigation to ensure their access and mobility.         The concept of full social cost pricing adds further complexity to the equity assessment.  Economic and  social  theorists would have  the  pricing mechanism  better  address  externalities  and  reflect  full  social  costs, nudging people’s behavior toward the social good and the protection of scarce public resources  (e.g.,  congestion  reduction  on  transportation  infrastructure),  environmental  resources,  and  public  health.    Those who  impose  social  costs  or  externalities  should  bear  the  burden  of  those  costs.    For  example, do drivers on crowded highways pay  the  full  social cost of  their driving  if  they are emitting  pollutants, or,  if a  toll causes diversion  from  the  tolled highway  to adjacent neighborhoods, do  those  neighborhoods incur the costs of pollution and crowding (GAO, 2012).    Equity concerns may slow or halt project planning and implementation and, therefore, are as much a  practical  concern  for  elected  officials  and  other  decisionmakers  as  a  philosophical  one.    Research  conducted,  in  part,  through  key  informant  interviews  with  planners  seeking  to  implement  variable  pricing and HOT  lane projects  in some 11 regions nationwide have found three distinct types of equity  concerns  (Weinstein &  Sciara,  2006).    “Income  equity,”  or  the  impact  it would  have  on  low‐income  drivers who would be unable to afford to use the facilities was the most often expressed concern.  To a  lesser extent, concerns were expressed about “geographic equity,” a worry that the lanes would unfairly  benefit or harm people based on where they lived or worked, and “modal equity,” a concern that transit  or carpooling would be adversely affected by initiatives that made solo driving more attractive.  FHWA  also cited these three major concerns as the principal types of equity considerations that relate to the  distribution  of benefits  and burdens  of  toll or  congestion  pricing projects  (FHWA,  2008).   While  five  principal  types  of  equity  concerns were  revealed  in  their  research  nationally  –  geographic,  income,  participation,  opportunity,  and  modal  –  geographic  equity  and  income  equity  received  a  deeper  treatment  in  the Washington  State  report  on  equity,  fairness,  and  uniformity  in  tolling  (Cambridge  Systematics, 2006).   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 42  Equity Definitions Raised in the Pricing Literature   In a 2013 Guidebook for State, Regional and Local Governments on Addressing Potential Equity Impacts of Road Pricing, several  types of equity are defined with the suggestion that thorough analysis into various types may be warranted once they are  identified for a specific project.  Many other authors  such as Viegas (2001), Levinson (2010), and Litman (2012) have also made  valuable definitional contributions below:    Ability Equity: Concerning issues and inequalities affecting physically disabled persons.     Access to tolled facilities equity: A term referring to whether barriers to owning a transponder, including requiring a credit  card and large deposits, make using the facility too onerous.     Compensatory equity: Social problems and inequities addressed by providing transportation access or resources.   Education equity: Concerning issues and inequalities facing less educated users in comparison to degree holders.   Environmental/green equity: Equal protection from environmental hazards for individuals, groups, or communities  regardless of race, ethnicity, or economic status.   Gender equity: A less recognized equity issue concerning the behavior and usage differences between male and female  motorists (e.g., one study finds that women value travel time reliability more than twice as highly as men).   Generational equity: A subset of vertical equity concerning the burdens placed on future generations from policies made  by and for the current generation.  For example, borrowing for long‐lived facilities is fair because it spreads the cost across  generations of users, as opposed to current users paying for future generations.   Geographic equity: A subset of vertical equity concerning how where people work and live influences the effect  transportation investment decisions has upon them (e.g., state versus state, urban versus rural).   Horizontal equity: How members of the same group (e.g., drivers or bus riders) fare relative to one another.   Income equity: Sometimes called redistributive equity.  This equity type includes the effects on economically  disadvantaged communities and low‐income people (e.g., Do improvements negatively impact disadvantaged  communities? Are improvements with negative consequences necessary for greater state or regional vitality?)   Language equity: Concerns and inequalities faced by users not native to the standard language.   Life‐stage equity: Concerning issues and inequalities faced by users of various life‐stages in comparison to other users  such as retirees, people with families, single users, etc.   Market equity: A price charged to each individual or group that is directly proportional to the costs imposed and benefits  received by that individual or group.   Modal equity: Dedicating revenues to the modes where they were generated (e.g., a state requiring that gas tax revenue  be spent on roads).   Modal equity: The effect on preferred travel behavior (e.g., Do activities conflict with public perceptions for the  encouragement of multimodal transportation options?).   Occupancy equity: Concerning inequities and concerns faced by SOV users in comparison to HOV users (and vice versa).   Opportunity equity: Costs and benefits are proportional to the size of the receiving group without regard to any other  distinguishing characteristics between groups.   Outcome equity: Extent to which consequences of a decision are considered just (Justice).  See vertical equity.   Participation equity: Sometimes called process equity, the extent to which there is fair access to the planning and  decision‐making process.  Do disadvantaged communities have a voice in the decision‐making process, and, is that voice  adequately represented relative to the scale of impact?     Payment medium access equity: Concern over a denial of access to priced road projects or reduced equity.  A significant  portion of the population does not have access to credit cards (20 to 40 percent of the population) or checking accounts  (10 percent) that facilitate easier use of a road pricing facility.  Others may find the deposits required to obtain a  transponder onerous.  Some toll roads require transponders.   Process equity: See participation equity.   Race/ethnicity equity: Considering whether different racial and ethnic groups, particularly minorities, are burdened  disproportionately, taking into account fees paid, benefits received, and impacts experienced.   Redistributive equity: See Income equity.   Spatial equity: Extent to which benefits and costs are distributed equally over space.  A geographic application of the  horizontal and vertical equity concepts.   Vertical equity: Extent to which members of different classes are treated similarly.  How members of different groups  (e.g., low‐income groups versus high‐income groups, drivers versus non‐drivers, or inner‐city versus rural residents) fare  relative to one another. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 43  GAO,  in  its  report  to Congress, also  focused on  income equity  and geographic equity as  the primary  equity considerations.  Regarding income equity, “low‐income drivers may spend a greater proportion of  their  income  to  pay  to  travel  at  preferred  times  or  incur  greater  costs  in  travel  time  by  choosing  alternate unpriced routes.” Concerning geographic equity, GAO described scenarios in which drivers in a  metropolitan  region who use  the  tolled corridor “may  incur greater costs  than drivers  in  the untolled  corridor because of the tolls they pay or the increase in travel time they incur by choosing an alternate  route.“    Also,  drivers  who  choose  to  avoid  the  tolls may  divert  traffic  from  tolled  routes  within  a  corridor,  potentially  contributing  to  congestion  on  an  alternate  route  and  adversely  affecting  surrounding  neighborhoods.    Complicating  matters,  equity  concerns  can  be  further  incurred  if  the  diversion of traffic is through low‐income and minority communities (GAO, 2012).  According  to  several  researchers,  the  equity  impacts  of  tolling  or  congestion  pricing  is  most  appropriately assessed in comparison to current and alternative sources of funding such as motor fuel  taxes, sales taxes, and local option taxes which are generally more regressive.  Tolls are generally more  equitable  than  funding  transportation  through  sales  or  gas  taxes,  or  local  option  taxes  that  are  consumption‐oriented (Schweitzer & Taylor, 2008).  Studies that comprehensively compare the equity of  tolls against no toll methods of transportation funding have found that tolls impose fewer costs on low‐ income persons (Franklin, 2007; Weinstein & Sciara, 2004).  Poorer households are likely to pay a larger  share  of  their  income  than  wealthier  households  if  relying  upon  the  sales  tax  as  a  basis  for  transportation funding.  The sales tax makes no distinctions between non‐users and users of the system  or between occasional or heavy users of the system.  In a study of equity in financing, the sales tax was  found to be less equitable than fuel taxes and tolls, which are paid by users of the system based on their  use (TRB, 2011).  Thus, in assessing the equity implications of tolling, the existing funding alternatives are the appropriate  frame for comparison.   Pricing and tolling solutions are being considered  in a world of  limited options.   Fairer, more  egalitarian  funding  systems  are  not  in  place.    “Prior  to  understanding  how  tolling  and  pricing  of  transportation  facilities  may  detract  or  enhance  geographic  equity,  it  is  necessary  to  understand  the  fairness of  the  current distribution of  transportation  resources.    If  the general public  does not believe the current system  is fair, then their evaluation of toll concepts will be  influenced by  this determination.  Toll equity cannot be examined in a vacuum independent of the current distribution  of resources” (Cambridge Systematics, 2006).    FHWA’s  Income‐Based  Equity  Impacts  of  Congestion  Pricing:  A  Primer  also weighs  in:  “the  ‘fairness’  question may be viewed within  the context of  the overall highway  financing  system,  in which,  in  the  absence of congestion fees, the costs of providing peak period highway service are borne by all highway  users, not  just by those who travel during congested periods or on congested routes.    In this context,  placing more of the burden of paying for peak period highway service on those who make use of peak  highway capacity is being increasingly viewed as an equity improvement” (FHWA, 2008).     Also, in arguing in favor of toll congestion pricing, rather than car registration fees, sales tax and the gas  tax, the Primer argues, “low‐income drivers usually drive older vehicles that are not as fuel‐efficient as  newer models.   They therefore must purchase more fuel per mile driven and consequently pay higher  fuel taxes for each mile driven than do those who own newer fuel‐efficient models” (FHWA, 2008).  The political motives of those critical of tolling and  its effects on  low‐income should at  least be closely  examined as such professed concerns can mask self‐interest (Taylor and Kalauskas, 2010).    In such light, the severe adverse effects on a small segment of low‐income users without route options  may warrant forms of mitigation, but the social benefits of reduced congestion and its externalities from 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 44  toll pricing should be better understood and appreciated to foster acceptability of the option (Plotnick et  al., 2011).    While exploring core principles of justice and fairness, the equity literature is not grounded in the body  of civil  rights  laws and their nondiscrimination principles and policies  (e.g., Title VI of  the 1964 Civil  Rights  Act)  that  serve  as  our  governing  policy  foundation.    It  is  through  enforcement  of  laws  and  regulations  that  specific  defined  classes  or  groups  are  afforded  protection  from  discrimination.   Similarly, it is through policy directives such as the Executive Order on Environmental Justice 12898 and  in subsequent U.S. DOT and FHWA Orders, policies are aligned across various  levels of governance  to  identify and address  the effects of a decision or  set of activities on  specific affected populations  that  have historically been disadvantaged.   These policy directives make clear that the federal government  both acknowledges the larger body of nondiscrimination laws and specifically identifies low‐income and  minority populations as affected populations for protection.    In addition to Title VI of 1964 and the Executive Order on Environmental Justice 12898, the Guidebook  and  Toolbox will  reference  other  authorities,  including  but  not  limited  to: National  Environmental  Policy Act of 1969;  Federal Aid Highway Act of 1970;  the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987; and  other  policy  implementation  directives  and  guidance  prepared  by  U.S.  DOT  and  FHWA.    The  fundamental  principles  of  environmental  justice  represent  an  example  of  policy  implementation  guidance  issued by U.S. DOT  that conveys  to practitioners,  in  simple  terms,  the obligation  to prevent  disproportionately high and adverse effects, ensure full and fair access to participation in transportation  decision‐making processes,  and prevent  inequality  in  the  receipt of benefits each  as  they  specifically  affect  low‐income and minority populations  (see  text box,  Fundamental  Principles of  Environmental  Justice).       With  some  exceptions,  guidance  on  the  treatment  of  environmental  justice  in  a  toll  facility  implementation context appears to be in short supply.  More often, reference to environmental justice  considerations are described as an element of equity in separate policy resource reports (Madi et al.,  2013) or a theme, among many, in  congestion pricing or managed lane policy reports (DKS, 2009; Burt  et al., 2010; Perez et al., 2011; Perez et al., 2012; PB, 2013; Mahendra et al., 2012).  In recent years, the  academic  research  and policy  resource  literature  for practitioners on  toll  implementation  appears  to  have opted for the wider “equity” lens.  This most notably includes FHWA’s often quoted Income‐based  Equity Impacts of Congestion Pricing – A Primer (FHWA, 2008) and the more recent Guidebook for State,  Regional and Local Governments on Addressing Potential Equity Impacts of Road Pricing issued by FHWA  (Madi et al., 2013).     Policy  guidance  for  practitioners  for  preparing  and  addressing  EJ  in  a  tolling  and  pricing  context  is  relatively limited in a statewide and metropolitan planning or project development and NEPA context in  Fundamental Principles of Environmental Justice   Linking Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address  Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low‐Income Populations, U.S. DOT’s Overview of Transportation  and Environmental Justice described three fundamental principles of environmental justice:    To avoid, minimize, or mitigate disproportionately high and adverse human health and environmental effects,  including social and economic effects, on minority populations and low‐income populations.   To ensure the full and fair participation by all potentially affected communities in the transportation decision‐ making process.   To prevent the denial of, reduction in, or significant delay in the receipt of benefits by minority and low‐income  populations.   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 45  the  transportation  decision‐making  process.    In  Texas,  a  guidance  report  was  prepared  with  the  objective  to  “present  an  approach  for  the  identification,  measurement,  and  mitigation  of  disproportionately high or adverse  impacts  imposed on minority and  low‐income  (EJ) communities by  toll  roads  relative  to non‐toll  roads.”   The  guidance highlights  general EJ  considerations on highway‐ related  transportation  improvements  as  well  as  specific  considerations  related  to  EJ  on  toll  implementation projects (Prozzi et al., 2006).     Subsequently,  in 2009,  FHWA and  the Texas Department of Transportation  (TxDOT) prepared a  Joint  Guidance  for  Project  and  Network  Level  Environmental  Justice,  Regional  Network  Land  Use  and  Air  Quality  Analyses  for  Toll  Roads  (FHWA/TxDOT,  2009).    The  document  outlines  an  approach  that  describes  the  relationship between system‐level planning using “network analysis”  to explore  indirect  and  cumulative  effects  by  the metropolitan  planning  organization  (MPO)  as  part  of  its metropolitan  planning process and project  facility  studies.   The  toll analysis can  subsequently be  incorporated  into  environmental documents for each of the projects included in the network.  While  falling  short of guidance,  the FHWA environmental  justice case  study, Regional Tolling Analysis  Informs NEPA Assessment of Cumulative Impacts on Low‐Income” addresses the nexus of tolling and EJ  (FHWA, 2011).   The Dallas‐Fort Worth, Texas case example describes  the approach  the region’s MPO,  the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), followed for studying the EJ impacts of the  tolled highways and HOV/managed lanes in the region's long range plan.    A background  report on  equity,  fairness,  and uniformity  in  tolling was  prepared  for  the Washington  State Toll Commission as an element of a comprehensive  report on  statewide  tolling  implementation  (Cambridge Systematics, 2006).   3.1.3.4  Presenting the Decision‐making Context  The  Guidebook  provides  a  step‐by‐step  framework  to  identify  and  address  EJ  issues  of  toll  implementation  actions  and  rate  changes.    Referencing  the  applicable  requirements  governing  decisions,  decisionmakers,  and  practitioners  are  important  early  steps.    The  framework  describes  procedural and analytical steps in the decision‐making process in which toll implementation projects are  planned and selected for funding, scoped for their level of effort, analyzed for their environmental and  social  impacts,  evaluated  and  monitored  for  their  successful  implementation  of  mitigation  commitments, and effectiveness in achieving project goals.      For  convenience,  the  text  box,  Guidebook  Framework  to  Evaluate  and  Address  EJ  Issues  of  Toll  Implementation and Rate Changes, lists the keys steps of the Conceptual Guidebook Framework.    Guidebook Framework To Evaluate and Address EJ Issues of   Toll Implementation and Rate Changes   1. Frame the project 2. Identify the applicable requirements governing decisions 3. Recognize the relevant decisionmakers and stakeholders: Roles, responsibilities and key concerns 4. Scope approach to measure and address impacts 5. Conduct impact analysis and measurement 6. Identify and assess mitigation strategies 7. Document results for decisionmakers and public 8. Identify the need for post‐implementation monitoring

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 46  Reflecting  on  the  likely  attributes  of  a  proposed  toll  facility  implementation  or  rate  increase  action,  decisionmakers and practitioners consulting the Guidebook will be asked to define and situate the scope  of activities in relationship to the stage of decisionmaking, decision‐making approval authority, and the  geography  of  the  action  (e.g.,  statewide  or  system‐level,  regional,  corridor,  or  facility‐specific).    EJ  concerns  are  expressed  when  affected  populations  as  commuters  do  not  have  access  to  their  workplaces through transit; or when costs of tolling exact a severe burden on  low‐income households  that necessitates a shift to congested roads, a reduction in discretionary trip‐making, or a modal shift to  a less preferred option (e.g., walking, biking, transit, carpooling) to avoid the toll.  This is a complex set  of considerations;  integral to the guidance then will be an  initial need for  identification of the key toll  road,  account  policies,  and  transportation  network  features.    The  Toolbox  provides  three  distinct  scenarios:  a  bridge  going  from  no  toll  to  toll;  a  roadway  going  from HOV  to HOT;  and  a  toll  facility  implementing a  rate  change.   The  illustrative  scenarios proceed  through  the  steps of  the Guidebook,  employing different tools (Case Examples, Reference Tables, Checklists, and Tools) to engage the public,  analyze the issues, and determine mitigation strategies, if warranted.     Literature Review Observations  U.S. DOT, as a principal source for funding and environmental approval, has authority over its funding  recipients  and  project  sponsors.    Their  oversight  authority  and  its  limits,  as  well  as  roles  and  responsibilities  of  various  parties  need  to  be  understood  by  the  decision‐making  agency  and  the  practitioner.    For  example,  U.S.  DOT  approves  all  congestion  pricing  projects  on  any  roadway  that  receives federal funds.  U.S. DOT also grants the project sponsor permission to have congestion pricing  on newly constructed roadways and lanes and converted HOV lanes.  The federal agency also approves  design exceptions and environmental reviews that allow for pricing on federally funded roads.  Through  funding  awards,  U.S.  DOT  also  studies,  implements,  and  evaluates  congestion  pricing  projects  and  programs.   The agency also oversees projects and certifies  that program performance standards have  been  met  (Burt  et  al.,  2010;  GAO,  2012;  Perez  et  al.,  2012).    Toll‐sponsoring  agencies,  in  turn,  particularly when  they  are  in  receipt of  federal  funding or  require  a  triggering  federal decision  (e.g.,  permit), should be expected to thoroughly identify and address EJ considerations.  The reviewed literature contains various useful references to the recent history and current tolling and  pricing context  for  toll  implementation  in  the U.S.  (DKS, 2009; Perez et al., 2011; GAO, 2012) and  the  decision‐making framework which informed the development of the Guidebook (Mahendra et al., 2011).     3.1.3.5  Scoping the Approach to Measure and Address Impacts / Conducting Impact Analysis and  Measurement    The Guidebook describes varying approaches and considerations when scoping key  issues of concern,  defining methods to identify the composition of the region of concern, identifying affected populations  in  the  context  of  EJ  using  appropriate  data  on  the  affected  community,  and  ensuring  that  affected  communities, including low‐income and minority populations, have the opportunity to be informed and  give  feedback.    The Guidebook makes  clear  the  type of  criteria  that  should be  employed  to  identify  affected populations and ensure their access to information and meetings.    The Guidebook also explores core analytical methods, performance measures, and metrics for assessing  impacts. The Guidebook focuses on the treatment of EJ considerations pertinent to tolling and pricing‐ related  transportation  projects.  The  categories  of  resource  impacts  –  generally  addressed  in  the  Statewide  and  Metropolitan  Planning,  Project  Development  and  NEPA,  and  post‐implementation  operational stage of decisionmaking — and how these effects may be identified and addressed in an EJ  report  are  described  in  broad  terms, with  references  for  effects  that  are NOT  unique  to  the  tolling  framework  (such as water quality and  cultural and historic  resources).   The  tools and  case examples 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 47  focus on effects and  impacts  that are unique  to  tolling projects compared  to other highway projects,  such as income‐related mobility, user household burdens, and so on.   Tools to conduct impact analysis and measurement are described with recognition that the capacity and  availability of tools and data sources may differ regionally, by project, or decision‐making stage.    Literature Review Observations  The literature review (and also confirmed through the content review assessment) indicates a variety  of  criteria  and  methods  for  identifying  affected  “minority”  and  “low‐income”  populations  and  characterizing their travel patterns.  These variations in definition and treatment are driven, in part, by  the stage of decisionmaking (e.g., regional or network level, corridor, and project facility) as well as the  availability of detailed socioeconomic data, user‐related travel‐related data, state and regional policies  and customary practices  for defining EJ communities of concern, and preferred  reference  sources  for  defining  thresholds.   The  guidance document  references  several  resource documents  for highlighting  technical  issues  associated  with  identification  of  affected  populations  and  boundaries  (e.g.,  Forkenbrock, 2004; Prozzi et al., 2006; Aimen and Morris, 2012).   Race and ethnic status are often ignored as it relates to travel patterns and changes in terms of access  and mobility  in existing  technical environmental  studies and  the equity‐related  toll  implementation  literature. Public involvement, community outreach, and engagement processes can be used to inform  the  identification of communities of concern or the scoping of  impacts of concern (Aimen and Morris,  2012; Prozzi et al., 2006), but receive less attention in the literature.    Policy  resource,  case  studies,  and  guidance  have  been  prepared  that  list  examples  of  impacts  of  concern  associated  with  a  toll  road  relative  to  a  non‐toll  road.    Some  examples  of  considerations  imposed by toll roads are described by Prozzi et al. (2006) adapting an earlier study prepared for TxDOT  (see Table 4).    The  policy  resource  guidance  literature  also  reminds  us  that  several  types  of  positive  and  adverse  impacts result from the construction and operation of roadways, including toll roads.  This can include  air quality, noise, mobility, accessibility, trip‐shifts (i.e., route, trip time, mode choice), safety, property  values and  land use,  social  isolation, economic development, among others  (Forkenbrock and Sheely,  2004; Prozzi et al., 2006).   Key relevant considerations for  impact assessment by topic are expected to  be described along with data sources, modeling methods and tools, and performance metrics to address  these considerations.  The FHWA/TxDOT Guidance (FHWA/TxDOT, 2009) defines considerations for project level and network  level  planning  level  analyses  of  toll  roads  (see  text  boxes,  Considerations  for  Project  Level  Environmental  Justice  Analyses  of  Toll  Roads  in  Texas  and  Considerations  for  Network  Level  Environmental Justice Analyses of Toll Roads in Texas).  Their guidance suggests that projects which are  a  part  of  a  planned  toll  network  should  be  subjected  to  additional  network  level  analyses  that  are  incorporated  into the regional MPO’s next Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) or update.   Once a  network  level  analysis  is  completed,  it  can  be  used  for  subsequent  network  segments  that  undergo  environmental  review.    At  the  project  level,  these  considerations  include  clear  identification  of  the  transportation network’s tolling and non‐tolled network, toll policies and rates, definition and  location  of affected populations, users of the system, cost differences between acquiring a tag with credit card or  with cash, and several other methodological and procedural considerations.        

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 48  Table 4.  Select Examples of Considerations Imposed by Toll Roads   Categories  Questions  Physical Environmental    Will the toll road divert a substantial amount of traffic through an EJ community?  If yes, will air quality be affected by shifts in free‐flow and delay?  If yes, what are the additional noise impacts? Mobility and Safety    Will the toll result in low‐income drivers being “priced out” of certain trips?  What reasonable alternative transportation modes are available to those that cannot afford the toll?  Will EJ individuals be forced to use less desirable (to them) modes or routes to satisfy their mobility needs?  Are there adequate reasonable non‐tolled north/south and east/west corridors to serve as alternative roads?  Will diverted traffic through EJ communities impose a higher safety risk to local pedestrians and bicyclists?  How will the toll road impact transit (e.g., altered bus routes, transit times/schedules)? Social and Economic    Will the non‐toll alternatives be equitable in terms of travel time or distance?  How will the toll road impact business access for both customers and deliveries?  Will the toll road displace a larger number of residents and businesses compared to the non‐toll roads?  How will the toll road impact property values (i.e., commercial vs. residential)?  How will the toll road impact the access of EJ communities to work, schools, hospitals, etc.? Cultural/Historic    Will the toll road impact or discourage access to cultural and recreational resources (e.g., historic sites, historic landmarks)? Source: Prozzi et al., 2006.   Guidebook for Identifying, Measuring and Mitigating Environmental Justice Impacts of Toll Roads.   Center for Transportation Research, Austin, TX.  The  literature  suggests  that  barriers  to  the  acquisition  of  transponders  and  toll  accounts  for  low‐ income people need to be recognized and addressed.  As it affects travel patterns and the assessment  of  impacts, the policies and attributes of toll accounts should be addressed as early as possible – as  part of the project action or alternatives under consideration during the environmental review process  and before the issuance of a record of decision.   The ability to access toll roads with electronic pricing  depends on the ability to access a transponder, not  just the ability to pay the tolls.   Large transponder  deposits, initial prepayment amounts, and use of credit cards are required by many toll agencies, putting  transponder usage outside  the  reach of  large percentage of  the U.S. population.    It  is estimated  that  between  10  and  20  percent  of  the  population  is  unable  to  overcome  these  barriers  to  transponder  ownership  (Parkany, 2005; Campbell et al., 2011).   Moreover, most tolled  facilities that use electronic  toll collection offer discounted  tolls  to  those who use  transponders  rather  than using video  tolling or  booth tolling.  Those who cannot purchase a transponder experience a significant economic barrier and  a regressive toll schedule (Parkany, 2005).  FHWA/TxDOT’s  guidance  requires  that  cost  differences  between  toll  tags  purchased  with  credit/debit  cards versus cash be examined.  They note that environmental documents, such as the one prepared for  electronic  toll collection  (ETC)  facilities  in  the Dallas and Fort Worth districts, describe cost differences  between toll tags with a prepaid credit card account, a cash toll account, and higher non‐toll tag costs. In 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 49  their guidance, they emphasize that “discussion should disclose how and where individuals may set up  and maintain toll accounts, and what requirements there are for account maintenance.  For those who  may  be  financially  constrained,  who  may  have  low‐literacy,  or  limited  English  proficiency,  the  practitioner  should  consider  if  access  to  the  Internet  is  required  to monitor  account  balances.  The  document should address whether toll tags are only available to those with credit cards. If cash accounts  are  available,  the  document  should  reflect where  and  how  cash  customers  can  pay”  (FHWA/TxDOT,  2009).   Researchers find that the relationship between toll pricing and  its consequences for  individual travel  behavior and classes of users is complex and contextual to region’s land use, transportation network,  and modal  alternatives,  among  other  factors.    Therefore,  it  is  important  to  closely  examine  travel  patterns  in a region and differentiate  the demographics and travel behavior of  low‐income users  to  work and other opportunities.   Those who purport to be interested in vertical equity and social justice  should  consider  differences  in  commuting  behavior  by  time  of  day,  distance  traveled,  and  auto‐ ownership of low‐income persons (Deka, 2004).  Low‐income groups may benefit from tolling solutions  because  they  are  less  inclined  to  use  toll  roads  and  toll  roads will  improve  bus  travel  speeds  and  generate revenue which  is used to support transit  (Litman and Brenman, 2012).   Whether a toll has a  disproportionate impact on EJ communities is a function of how many lower‐income drivers use the toll  facility,  how many  are  discouraged  or  prevented  from  using  the  toll  facility,  the  quality  of  available  alternative transportation options, and how toll revenues are used (Litman, 2005; Prozzi et al., 2006).   In  terms  of  measuring  changes  in  mobility  and  access,  the  literature  points  to  several  possible  analytical methods  and  tools.    Selection  of  tools will  be  affected  by  data  availability,  the  region’s  capacity and commitment to travel demand modeling and survey research, cooperation of state and  regional  planning  and  operational  tolling  authority  agencies,  stage  of  decisionmaking,  compliance  expectations from regulatory agencies, and other factors.  Among the tools discussed in the literature  are:    demographic  analysis  of  affected  populations;  geographic  information  system  (GIS)  analysis  of  socioeconomic  characteristics  and  travel  patterns  (Burt  et  al.,  2010;  Madi  et  al.,  2013;  Southern  Environmental Law Center, 2013); attitudinal surveys, interviews, and focus groups of the general public  and corridor (Burt et al., 2010); travel diary surveys to gather detailed, specific travel behavior data of  various groups of  interest  (Burt et al., 2010; Ray et al., 2014; Burris and Hannay, 2003); econometric  methods  that employ more  robust  travel surveys  (Plotnick and Thacker, 2009); origin and destination  analyses;  and  regional  travel demand models  and  stated  choice  surveys  and modeling,  among other  approaches.   The Southern Environmental  Law Center  found  three general approaches  in use  to assess  the equity  impacts  of managed  lanes:    driver  opinion  and willingness  to  pay‐surveys  to  compare  differences  in  opinions between higher and lower‐income drivers; differing enrollment levels in programs or usage of  transponders  among  higher  and  lower‐income  drivers;  and,  more  rarely,  actual  data  analysis  of  managed  lane use by  income  level based on  transaction data.   Opinions and  rates of enrollment are  generally comparable, but actual use data finds that  low‐income drivers are  less frequent users of the  priced lanes than higher‐income drivers (Southern Environmental Law Center, 2013).    In  making  decisions  about  the  right  tools,  practitioners  should  seek  to  integrate  the  collection  of  demographic data as fully as possible  into their overall evaluation data collection plan.   Such data can  and should be collected in any and all surveys, but also consider how other data of EJ importance can be  collected  in other ways, such as origin‐destination  information via  license plate recognition technology  (Burt et al., 2010).   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 50    Considerations for Project Level Environmental Justice Analyses of Toll Roads in Texas  The FHWA/TxDOT guidance identifies considerations for discussion for all projects which include toll features (including HOT,  high occupancy vehicle/managed or managed lanes).  An abbreviated list of these considerations, include:     Non‐toll facilities.  The document will need to describe available non‐toll facilities that offer alternative travel options  (e.g., free main lanes on same facility, frontage roads, and parallel arterials).    Travel time differences between toll and non‐toll routes (including frontage roads).    Toll rates and range of charges, if any if tolls are variable, regarding transit vehicles, HOVs and motorcycles.   Use of toll revenues.    Toll collection methods (e.g., ETC, toll booths) and how it affects access and cost.    Cost differences between toll tags purchased with credit/debit cards versus cash, including how and where individuals  may set up and maintain toll accounts, and what requirements there are for account maintenance.     Location of toll booths, particularly in relation to identified EJ areas.    EJ‐related demographic data for the toll road user groups (generally by traffic analysis zone (TAZ).    Impact on Travel Times.  Disclosure that inability to use the toll facilities or lack of parallel non‐tolled alternatives may  result in increased travel times when using non‐toll alternatives.   Economic impact to individuals using the toll facilities.  One method to accomplish this is to multiply the anticipated toll  cost to use the proposed toll facility by an estimate of 500 trips per year (i.e., 250 round trips to work per year).  This can  be put into context by discussing what percentage of household income this cost represents for a household at the  poverty level vs. a household at median household income.  If variable toll rates are used, an analysis at the high, low, and  mid‐range toll rates should be provided.    Mitigation measures.  Since the economic impact of tolls will be greater for low‐income populations, mitigation measures  (e.g., transit service improvements, toll subsidies, HOV discounts) can be recommended for consideration.  If the analysis  does find disproportionately high and adverse effects, mitigation measures must be considered.  Mitigation measures  may be addressed in a region’s/MPO’s toll policy.    Accommodation for LEP and Persons with Disabilities.  Accommodations provided by the tolling authority to allow  populations with limited English proficiency (LEP) and the disabled to access the toll facilities.  For example, the TxTag  website is available in Spanish, and provides a customer service contact number for the deaf and hard of hearing.    Potential users of the toll facility.  Origin and destination (O&D) studies are one example of an analysis that may be used  to identify potential users of the proposed toll road.  Trips are considered toll candidates if use of the toll road would  decrease travel time.  While the O&D studies or travel times are acceptable means of identifying potential toll roads  users, MPOs may propose alternative methods for identifying potential toll road users.   Travel demand and other modeling.  When travel demand or other models are used in the analysis, a discussion of the  assumptions and limitations associated with the model should also be included in the discussion.  

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 51        Considerations for Network Level Environmental Justice Analyses of Toll Roads in Texas  The FHWA/TxDOT guidance identifies considerations for system or regional level studies, including the  identification of existing and planned toll network projects in the financially constrained MTP.  Several of the  items prepared for the project level analysis in an environmental document would also be referenced in the  network level analysis, including discussions of:   Toll policies   Methods of toll collection   Policies regarding the use of toll revenues and/or mitigation measures   LEP provisions in accessing toll facilities    Items included in the network analysis may be repeated in all relevant environmental documents (most likely in  the cumulative impacts section).  Toll network analyses are expected to discuss or document:    Maps indicating the implementation of the toll network over time.     Cumulative economic impact to individuals of using the toll network facilities.  Similar to methods of project  level economic impact analysis, but expanded to encompass the entire network.  In the Dallas‐Fort Worth  area, the average trip length was used to compute a reasonable estimate of the distance the average  commuter would travel along toll facilities.  The average trip distance is multiplied by the number of assumed  trips per year (500) and then multiplied by the estimated cost per mile of traveling on toll facilities.  The  discussion should discuss what percentage of household income this cost represents for a household at the  poverty level vs. a household at median household income.  If variable toll rates are used, an analysis at the  high, low and mid‐range toll rates should be provided.    Growth of the toll network.  This can be a simple description.  For example, in the Dallas‐Fort Worth area,  approximately 11% of the main lane miles are currently tolled, and by the MTP horizon year (2030) this will  increase to approximately 30%.    Identification of potential users of the toll network facilities.  O&D studies may be used to identify potential  toll users.  In the Houston area, trips were considered toll candidates if use of the toll road would decrease  travel time by half a minute or more.  Typically, users are identified in the same manner as at the project  level, but the analysis is expanded to include the entirety of the proposed tolled network.  It can be illustrated  on maps using gradation to show trips generated by TSZ using the toll network.    Travel demand and other modeling.  O&D studies or travel times are acceptable methods for identifying  potential toll roads users.  However, the MPOs may propose alternative methods for identifying potential toll  road users.   Measurement of Benefits.  A measure of the benefits of implementing the financially constrained MTP,  including the toll network.  In the Houston area, this was accomplished by a comparative analysis of the  average travel times for EJ zones and non‐EJ zones using toll facilities and using non‐toll facilities, under both  the build and no build scenario. In the Dallas‐Fort Worth area, traffic analysis network performance reports  generated by the travel demand model are used to show the overall benefits of projects in the MTP, including  the toll network, by comparing the horizon year build and no build scenarios.  The additional revenues and  expedited implementation of projects can also be cited as a benefit of the toll network.  

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 52  Actual transaction data was used to examine usage on the I‐85 managed lane after its implementation;  the data was obtained from Georgia’s State Road and Tolling Authority.  The available data, however, is  reported at  the zip code  rather  than a  smaller  tract or block group  level and contained  several  fields  (date, duration, average  speed,  toll  status,  cost, and  zip  code  for  some 1.5 million  transactions  for a  four‐month period  in the fall of 2012).   The data was used to measure the strength of the relationship  between median  income and per capita HOT  lane use.   The report  found a moderate correlation  that  suggested median  income  is  not  the  only  factor  influencing HOT  lane  (Southern  Environmental  Law  Center, 2013), and this finding was consistent with that reported by Patterson and Levinson (2008).  In assessing the report’s  limitations, the Southern Environmental Law Center (2014) observed that the  analysis  could  be  refined,  in  the  absence  of  individual  information  on  income  and  use  patterns,  by  mapping the user addresses and comparing the result against income at the tract or block group level.   Ideally,  other  variables  should  be  incorporated  such  as  proximity  to  HOT  lane  entry  points,  likely  destinations, availability of alternate  routes, and  transit  service.   This  type of comprehensive analysis  would require travel demand modeling tools, geospatial analysis, and other tools to address some of the  variables.   In  Texas,  their  guidance  references  the  potential  application  of  origin‐destination  studies;  trips  are  considered toll candidates  if use of the toll road would decrease travel time.   Their guidance also calls  for an evaluation of the “economic impacts to individuals using the toll facilities.”  The method examines  and standardizes the household cost burden as a performance measure with due consideration for the  varying household  incomes  for median and  low‐income households  (FHWA/TxDOT, 2009).   Plotnick et  al.  (2011)  performed  a  similar  type  of  assessment  of  household  burden  related  in  the  Puget  Sound  region.   Pop‐Gen, as discussed  in Bonsall  (2005) and Schweitzer  (2009),  is a method  that may warrant  further  research  as  an  effective  practice.    It  utilizes  the  existing  distribution  of  particular  population  characteristics, notably age, disability, ethnicity, and language, to construct “Monte Carlo” simulations.   The  simulation  bootstraps  (random  sampling  with  replacement)  a  distribution  of  the  most  likely  travelers  from  particular  zones.    The  “travelers”  are  then  assigned  likely  links,  including  the  priced  roadways,  via  algorithm.    This method  offers  a more  in‐depth  analysis  of  population  strata,  while  eliminating the standard problem of small‐number and small area statistics.    Income  equity  analysis  would  be  improved  by  further  refinements  to  travel  demand  models  that  support  income  segmentation.  The  initially  reviewed  literature  contains  limited  discussion  of  approaches  to modeling  impacts  to  low‐income  travelers  that may  be worthy  of  referencing  and/or  research  for  the Guidebook. NCHRP  Report  722,  Assessing Highway  Tolling  and  Pricing Options  and  Impacts:  Volume  1:  Decision‐Making  Framework,  seeks  to  generalize  the  decision‐making  processes  involved  in  implementing  tolling/pricing  projects.   While  the  report's  treatment  of  equity  and  EJ  is  relatively  limited, some  important principles of equity and fairness and effective practices  in modeling  were mentioned:   Income  equity  analysis  is  improved  when  travel  demand  models  are  refined  to  support  income  segmentation  (three  to  four  income groups)  in  the  trip generation,  trip distribution, and mode choice  models, allowing travel impacts to be distinguished for each group.     Mode choice decisions should reflect differences by income groups to determine to what extent  lower‐income  populations might  be  unduly  affected  by  certain  pricing  concepts.    Potential  strategies to modify  the pricing alternatives to mitigate  their possible  impact  to  lower‐income  populations should be identified.  

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 53   Low‐income  populations  without  free  route  alternatives  should  be  provided  with  improved  transit service (improved by means of toll revenue) or discounted toll rates.    Barriers to the acquisition of transponders and toll accounts  for  low‐income people should be  eliminated.   Willingness to pay as a selection criterion represents a problem since it creates an income bias  in the highway system development.    The  Tool Using  Travel Demand Models  for  EJ  Assessments  helps  the  practitioner  specifically  address these travel demand model concerns.   In a  study of methods on  congestion pricing projects  for  the  FHWA,  researchers  (Burt et al., 2010)  recommended  that  an  assessment  of  environmental  justice  impacts  is  necessary  to  conduct  a  comprehensive  travel  impacts  evaluation,  including  as  many  potentially  significant  project‐related  travel  changes  as  possible.   While  varying  by  region  and  project,  a  comprehensive  travel  impacts  analysis – one supportive of a robust EJ evaluation – would assess the travel impacts shown in text box,  Recommended Considerations for Travel Impact Analysis for EJ.    Moreover,  a  comprehensive  travel  impacts  analysis  should have  the  capacity  to  identify  the  impacts  upon different populations, including but not limited to minority and low‐income populations (see text  box, Affected Groups  for Travel  Impact Analysis  for EJ).   For example, what  types of people use  the  roads where traffic volumes decreased and increased?  What types of people made what sorts of mode  choice changes and how did those changes impact the quality of their travel experience?  Which types  of people paid various amounts of congestion charging fees? (Burt et al., 2010)    Depending  on  the  project,  this  degree  of  detail  can  present  challenges  for  data  collection  that will  inform  the development of  a  comprehensive  evaluation plan.    Surveys will of  course be  significantly  impacted, where it will be important to categorize the respondent according to all of the demographic  and other characteristics of interest, but so will the collection of objective data such as traffic data.  For  example,  understanding  how  impacts  differ  between  carpoolers  and  single  occupant  vehicles  could  mean that collecting average vehicle occupancy data is important (Burt et al., 2010).     “Social  exclusion”  is  rarely  invoked  as  a  central  concern  or  rationale  for  the  environmental  justice  assessment or to inform the identification of affected populations, impacts of concern, or measures to  assess environmental justice or equity impacts.  Social exclusion means that a transportation system by  virtue “of  its price, areas of service, or vehicle category  is perceived to be biased against a social class,  poor neighborhood or financial reach of a percentage of the population” (Madi et al. 2013).   Similarly,  “geographies  of  opportunity”  is  an  important  element  of  the U.S. Housing  and Urban Development  efforts to affirmatively further fair housing.  Places of high opportunity are rich with desirable attributes  and amenities  (e.g., higher paying  jobs,  job growth, higher  incomes and  less poverty,  low‐crime, good  schools, higher  educational  attainment),  suggesting  the  places  to  live or  to  at  least have  convenient  access  and  connections  through  transportation  systems  and  services.    These  preferred  destinations,  linked to places of residence, are rarely used as the destinations for measuring changes  in accessibility  with and without tolling solutions.    

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 54        Recommended Considerations for Travel Impact Analysis for EJ  According to the FHWA study, Synthesis, of Congestion Pricing‐Related Environmental Impact Analysis, a  comprehensive travel impacts analysis ‐‐ one which will support a robust EJ evaluation – might consider the  following impacts.  Traffic volumes    Vehicle miles traveled   Average speeds   Person and vehicle throughput   Travel times, including some “indexed” measure such as the travel time index utilized by the Texas  Transportation Institute in their urban traffic monitoring program for U.S. DOT   Travel time reliability, such as represented by a “buffer index” or “planning index”, both of which capture the  extra increment of time travelers need to plan for given observed variability in travel conditions   Geographic and temporal extent of congestion, e.g., hours of congestion and miles of congested roadway   Vehicle classification/vehicle mix   Average vehicle occupancy   Mode choice/mode split   Accident rates and contributing factors   System operator and/or traveler (all modes) perceptions of safety and congestion   Transit ridership   Transit travel time   Transit schedule adherence/on time performance   Household traveler behavior (travel diaries completed by each member of the household documenting  routes, modes, foregone trips, times of travel, etc. with accompanying attitudinal surveys)   Congestion pricing charges paid  Affected Groups for Travel Impact Analysis for EJ  In the FHWA study, Synthesis, of Congestion Pricing‐Related Environmental Impact Analysis, the findings from a  comprehensive travel impact analysis would enable consideration of the effects upon several populations.   Depending on the project, the types of differential impacts which should be considered for investigation include:   People of varying income and education levels   People of various racial groups   People with various employment status, including full‐time, part‐time, and unemployed   Users of different transportation modes, including drive alone, rideshare, telecommuters, bicyclists, users of  various transit services, and pedestrians    People with varying travel origins and destinations (namely residential and work locations)   Users with varying degrees of flexibility in changing their time, route, or mode of travel   Different trip purposes   Travel during different days of the week and time of day   Frequent travelers versus occasional travelers   People with disabilities   People with differential access to various travel modes, including transit and private auto   New residents versus long‐term residents   Visitors versus permanent residents   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 55  3.1.3.6  Educating Decisionmakers, Stakeholders, and Community Engagement     The  Guidebook  and  Toolbox  seek  to  illuminate  proven  practical  approaches  for  educating  decisionmakers and the affected public on sometimes complex issues in toll implementation. , including  efforts  to  engage  low‐income  and minority  populations.   While  the Guidebook  and  Toolbox  explore  several  types  of  data  sources,  analytical methods  and metrics  that  can  be  differentiated  by  income  segment  or  race,  impacts  cannot  be  solely  vetted  through  quantitative  methods.    Through  public  involvement and community engagement, practitioners can  learn from affected  individuals about their  existing conditions and potential impacts of the toll road and pricing decisions.    Specific  approaches,  techniques,  and  possible  barriers  to  ensuring  participation  of  low‐income  and  minority populations  in outreach processes are discussed.   The Guidebook describes approaches  that  can  be  effectively  used  to  identify  affected  populations;  explains  possible  barriers  to  participation;  suggests  ways  to  overcome  barriers;  and  considers  how  communities  receive  information.    The  Guidebook  acknowledges  the  challenges  of  informing  and  educating  affected  communities  as  to  toll  implementation  effects  and  explores  effective  strategies  to  ensure  informed  feedback  and  build  the  types  of  relationships with  partnering  organizations  that  can  promote meaningful  opportunities  for  involvement.   Specific  tools and  case examples highlight why various approaches are effective, detail  some techniques, highlight  limitations, and  identify resource requirements for their  implementation as  well as who may have used the approach successfully in the past.    Literature Review Observations  Generally,  the  reviewed  resource  policy  documents  present  planning,  engagement,  and  communication  strategies  for building  support and promoting acceptability of  toll pricing  solutions.   The articles  tend  to present  lessons  in managing perceptions,  finding effective ways  to  communicate  pricing  proposals,  and  developing  project  plans  for  their  best  chances  of  successful  implementation  (Mahendra et al., 2011).  In  promoting  the  “acceptability”  of  pricing,  various  strategic  steps  and  persuasive  arguments  are  outlined.  Engagement and communications should focus on the most resonant challenges: congestion‐ related  problems  and,  in  some  areas  or  corridors,  pollution  or  the  need  for  revenues  in  a  time  of  shrinking traditional revenue sources.  Thus, “planners need to assess which problems are most pressing  and their impact on affected parties, all of which will help fashion the kind of pricing proposed, how it is  cast, and how its benefits are framed in communications and engagement” (Mahendra et al., 2011).  In  light of potential opposition,  this  thread of  research emphasizes activities  for cultivating  important  relationships and enlisting support strategically and cautiously.  Thus, “planners at the incubation stage  should  not  initiate  broad  outreach  involving  significant  public  and  traveler  surveys,  public meetings,  media  announcements,  and  informational  or  interactive websites.   More  appropriate  is  an  informal  working committee of the relevant agency actors and one or more decisionmakers key to passage of the  plan  (“gatekeepers”) who  guide  and  review  preliminary  studies.    Planners  and  analysts  now  should  match  a  pricing  concept  to  a  severe  and  resonant  problem  or  set  of  problems  to  ensure  potential  effectiveness and support  for continued assessment.   Also, planners should explore potential support  for more detailed study, planning, and eventual outreach as most pricing projects require considerable  time and resources to be brought to fruition” (Mahendra et al, 2011).   Understanding the relationship  and  influence  of  various  parties  with  respect  to  specific  decisionmakers  who  must  pass  program  proposals is important as well as cultivating champions (Mahendra et al, 2011).  At this strategy‐setting stage, the research reflects only limited discussion of diversity in the race/ethnic  or  income  representation  of  advisory  groups,  task  forces,  and  focus  groups,  although  there  is 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 56  recognition  of  the  need  to  translate  public  documents  to  address  limited  English  proficiency  populations.   According to the literature, when it comes to building support for toll implementation, invoking equity  and  fairness  has  a  broader  appeal  if  it  is  not  framed  narrowly  in  terms  of  income  equity.    Thus,  practitioners  are  reminded  that  the  acceptability  of  pricing  programs  does  not  vary  greatly  across  income  groups.    Other  fairness  issues  have  greater  resonance  –  for  example,  “paying  twice”  necessitating  the need  for demarcation of  improvements and  services  supported by  traditional  taxes  versus those supported by new pricing revenues; possible evasion of pricing; the ease of participation in  developing pricing plans  (sometimes  termed “procedural”  fairness); and pricing effects perceived as a  hardship on certain population segments.   Also, “use equity (benefits  in proportion to facility use) and  spatial equity (benefits by location) are important, calling attention to program design issues related to  providing transit as an alternative in underserved locations, and setting upper limits on charges and the  number of crossings priced in a given time period” (Mahendra et al., 2011).   In some cases, the  literature offers advice to agencies and practitioners about what to communicate  and how to communicate to address equity concerns, depending on the context of the decision (i.e.,  new tolling implementation vs. expansion of existing network).  Agencies considering implementation  of  road  congestion  pricing  strategies  need  to  clearly  communicate  information  about  tolling,  how  revenues will be used, and discuss and address potential equity concerns.“  For regions where toll lanes  are  referred  to as  ‘Lexus  lanes,’  it  is best  to address  that directly and explain  that other  road pricing  projects are utilized by a mix of vehicles and drivers from all income classes” (Madi et al., 2013).  Places  with mature  and new  express  lane  systems  can  explain  that  “priced  roadway provides  an  additional  travel  choice  for  drivers.  In  their  communications,  they  can  explain  remediation measures  like  the  addition of transit in the corridor” (Madi et al., 2013).   The  requirement  of  an  electronic  tolling  account  (e.g.,  need  to  purchase  a  transponder, maintain  a  prepaid  account  balance)  can  be  a  concern  for  low‐income  or  other  groups without  credit  cards  or  access to checking accounts (Mahendra et al., 2011).     In  some  cases,  reflecting  on  how  equity  concerns  are  expressed,  the  literature  offers  bolstering  arguments  grounded  in  prior  research  studies  and  public  opinion  polling,  to  present  toll  implementation projects  in  the most  favorable  light.   Thus, Mahendra et al.  (2011), reflecting on the  various  contexts  of  conversion  to  HOT  lanes,  variable  pricing  on  new  or  rehabilitated  facilities,  and  existing facilities, offers:     Usage surveys of I‐15 lanes in San Diego and I‐394 lanes in Minneapolis showed high support for  HOT  lanes across all  income groups, with  lowest and highest  income groups expressing about  equal support.   Experience shows  that HOT  lanes are  likely  to be used by all  income groups, although higher‐ income  drivers  are more  likely  to  have  transponders  (I‐394 Minneapolis);  transit  usage  has  improved  in  the  case of Minneapolis  I‐394 HOT  lanes benefitting  low‐income  commuters; no  disadvantages caused to transit and carpool users.   Experience  to date shows  the  income equity  issue has not blocked programs, nor has  it been  critical  in focus groups and surveys (e.g., for planned expansion of  I‐15, survey of facility users  found 71% consider the extension fair with few differences based on ethnicity or income; equity  assessments  are  limited but  for  SR‐91).   Use of  the express  lanes  increased over  time  for  all  modes across all incomes, with percentage of trips for the lowest and highest incomes (20% and  50%) stable over time. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 57   Experience to date shows income equity has not blocked programs and is not a paramount issue in planning or focus groups and surveys. Equity assessments are limited but a study of changes in  electronic  pass  ownership  before/after  price  changes  in  Illinois  shows  ownership  rates increased across all income groups.  Equity  concerns may  center more  on  those  with  inflexible  work  schedules,  with  peak‐hour tolling  in effect on HOT  lanes; however, optional nature of HOT  lanes reduces concerns about some travelers being worse off than before. The 2008 FHWA Primer on congestion pricing income equity impacts runs through some examples as  well  as  other  references  from  early  HOT  Lane  or  “partial  pricing”  studies.    Drawing  upon  a  combination of surveys, polling,  focus groups, and post‐implementation  references,  the  force of  the  arguments  tend  to  bolster  tolling  implementation  and  minimize  its  equity  concerns.    “Project  experience has shown, particularly for the most common projects funded under the early phases of the  program  (e.g., HOT  lanes), that the perception of unfairness may be exaggerated.”   Also, “overall, the  perception  that  congestion  pricing  is  an  inequitable  way  of  responding  to  the  problem  of  traffic  congestion does not appear  to be borne out by experience”  (FHWA, 2008).   Examples of acceptance  from  San Diego, Denver, Minnesota,  Houston,  and Orange  County  are  given,  including  some  of  the  following:    A  travel  survey of San Diego  I‐15  found  that “users of San Diego’s  I‐15 HOT  lanes were more likely  to  have  higher  incomes  than  were  drivers  in  regular  lanes,  but  lower‐income  drivers sometimes did use the HOT lanes.”  On  plans  and  implementation  of  Denver’s  I‐25/U.S.  36,  “public  outreach  leading  to implementation of HOT  lanes did not uncover critical concerns regarding equity or other social impacts, nor have such concerns arisen since implementation.”  On  I‐394  in Minneapolis‐St. Paul, “Patterson and Levinson  (2008) stated  that  ‘the  [HOT]  lanes are  Lexus  Lanes  in  the  sense  that  increased  income  predicts  increases  in  three  of  the  four metrics used  to measure direct benefit…  Individuals with higher  incomes  receive more direct benefits from the lane than those with lower incomes.’  However, according to the University of Minnesota and NuStats  (2005), HOT  lane usage with MnPass was  reported  across all  income levels,  including  by  79  percent  of  high‐income  respondents,  70  percent  of  middle‐income respondents, and 55 percent of low‐income respondents.”  For the  I‐10 and US‐290 HOT  lanes  in Houston, TX, “focus groups held during project planning did not find concerns about social equity among either corridor users or the public at large.  The general reaction was that all would benefit  if congestion were reduced.   There also have been no equity concerns raised during operations…  Burris et al. (2007) found that even in the lowest‐ income group, over two‐thirds of respondents were interested in paying to use the HOT lanes.” Some of  these arguments, as  can be  seen  in  the content  review  section of  this  report  (see Research  Results  Section  3.2,  Summary  of  Planning  and  Environmental Document Review)  are  referenced  in  some of the completed environmental impact studies.     The  toll pricing  literature  reviewed mentions  some  stakeholder or outreach engagement processes,  but  does  not  typically  describe  practical  approaches  taken  for  specifically  involving  traditionally  disadvantaged  populations,  such  as  low‐income  and  minority  populations  in  decision‐making  processes.  The EJ and public involvement literature, however, describes approaches to identify affected  populations,  provide  information  in  effective  ways  using  visualization  tools,  schedule  meetings  at  appropriate times, select accessible locations, translate into multiple languages or work effectively with 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 58  limited English proficiency (LEP) and low‐literacy populations, work with “trusted advocates” to increase  turnout, hold events formally and  informally ‒ all as ways to meaningfully engage with disadvantaged  populations, including low‐income and minority populations.  These strategies are generally highlighted  or  presented  in  detail  in  various  policy  resource  or  guidance  publications  (Aimen  and Morris,  2012;  Cairns et al. 2003; Prozzi et al., 2006), although there are generally few references to tolling and pricing  examples.  In  this  literature,  it  is  recognized  that EJ  communities  should be given  the opportunity  for  meaningful  participation.    EJ  community  outreach  efforts  are  foreseen  during  various  steps  of  the  analysis  to  ensure  that  all  the  adverse  impacts  are  known  and  that  effective mitigation  options  are  designed  to  lessen or offset  the disproportionately high  impacts  (Prozzi et al., 2006).   Typical barriers  faced  by  EJ  communities  to  participation  –  for  example,  distrust  of  government  agencies,  limited  understanding of a project will affect their lives and how participation would benefit, language barriers,  cultural  differences,  wrong  time  or  inaccessible  location  for  outreach  event,  among  others  ‐‐  are  considered (Prozzi et al., 2006; Aimen & Morris, 2012).  The  reviewed  literature on  toll  implementation, while generally  less detailed and  focused on  specific  efforts  to  engage  low‐income  or minority  populations,  does  acknowledge  the  challenges  of  building  public  support,  including messages  and  ways  to  address  equity  concerns.    For  I‐394  in Minnesota,  strategies to build support for pricing through regular meetings of advisory and community task forces  and  focus  groups  (Buckeye  & Munnich,  2006)  are  described.    Stated  preference  surveys  and  focus  groups  have  been  employed  to  examine  specific  challenges  of  low‐income  populations  in  accessing  transponders and replenishment options are represented in the literature (Campbell et al., 2011).  Video  has been used to  inform and promote use of  facilities along SR‐91  in San Diego and  for the LA Metro  Express Lanes.  In Washington State, strategies have acknowledged the need for LEP plans and outreach  and the use of customer service centers for the SR520 project.     3.1.3.7  Identification and Assessment of Mitigation Strategies  The Guidebook and Toolbox  include  steps  to address and mitigate  the EJ effects of  tolling.   Effective  mitigation starts in the planning stage and early in the project development process, not at its end; it is  an integral and ongoing part of the alternatives development and the analysis process.  In the proposed  step‐by‐step  framework  approach,  the  importance  of  education  of  leadership  and  including  affected  populations – early and often –  is emphasized so that agencies and practitioners can better align their  decision‐making processes with those affected by possible effects of each alternative.     As  suggested  previously,  ensuring  access  to  transponders  is  a  form  of  mitigation  that  should  be  considered in initial program design.  The Guidebook and Toolbox can describe how select systems have  been designed  to ensure  that people without access  to credit cards or bank accounts are able  to use  transponders despite not having credit or debit cards.  When concerns are clearly addressed early in the  process –  for example, by developing  travel  surveys,  forecasting  tools, and performance metrics  that  allow  transparent  and  rigorous  evaluation  of  pricing  changes  and  their  effects  on  low‐income  communities – project sponsors may be able to adjust their project design to address issues of fairness  (e.g., full tolling vs. HOT lane conversions).       However, when  the  adverse  effects of  a project  appear  to be unavoidable  and  they  are  appreciably  more severe or greater  in magnitude for  low‐income or minority populations than for non‐minority or  non‐low‐income populations,  there  is a strong  likelihood  that  the project will  raise concerns about EJ  impacts.    When  there  is  no  practicable  alternative,  mitigating  the  significant  impacts  of  a  project  expected to have a disproportionately high and adverse effect upon minority or low‐income populations  remains an important means for addressing threats to the affected populations and the livability of their  communities.  In this case, mitigation may involve devising forms of compensation or other strategies to  offset the burdens imposed by toll projects on affected EJ communities.    

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 59  Literature Review Observations  Several  authors  in  the  literature  review  or  referenced  in  the  articles  conclude  that  tolling  implementation, even  if  regressive, may have merit  for  its  congestion  relief benefits.   They  suggest  that adverse impacts to low‐income households can be offset by income transfer or tax policies.  Tolls  may  have  adverse  impacts  for  low‐income  drivers,  particularly when  free  alternative  routes  are  not  available, but they can be potentially offset by how collected revenues are used (Levinson, 2011; Small,  1992a; Santos & Rojey, 2004; Safirova et al., 2005; Eliasson & Mattsson, 2006).     In principle, the redistribution of revenues on a per capita basis or according to income should offset  the  regressivity  of  tolls  (Small,  1983;  Franklin,  2007),  but  there  are  financial,  administrative,  and  political challenges  in revenue recycling or redistribution.   For example, funding revenues may not be  sufficient to remedy equity effects, particularly if net revenues are being dedicated to road construction  or debt service (TRB, Special Report 303, 2011).      In  its recommendations,  the Southern Environmental Law Center notes: “the cost of constructing and  maintaining managed lanes greatly exceeds the revenue generated by their tolls, and the remaining cost  is paid for with public funds collected by all Georgia taxpayers.  As a result, drivers who cannot afford to  use the lanes or choose not to do so are nonetheless paying for these projects.  Capping the availability  of non‐toll public funding for future managed lanes projects will make them more equitable by limiting  the subsidization of users by non‐users” (Southern Environmental Law Center, 2013).    Regardless, the transportation EJ implications of how congestion pricing project revenues are reinvested  should be explicitly considered (Burt et al., 2011).  In California, statutes mandate that some 18 percent  of toll revenues from the Bay Area Toll Authority get transferred into three accounts held by the region’s  multimodal  planning  agency,  the Metropolitan  Transportation  Commission.    In  the  17‐county  region  comprising the boundaries of the Port Authority of New York‐New Jersey, net toll revenues are used to  subsidize transit services (FHWA, 2008).     Travel  credits  have  been  suggested  as  a  means  for  mitigating  the  adverse  effects  to  low‐income  drivers who must drive solo.   Under this approach, drivers receive a monthly allowance of credits for  travel  which  can  be  used  on  toll  roads.    Extra  credits  can  be  established  to  address  population  segments in need (e.g., welfare‐to‐work).  Credits have been examined through the FAST Miles, Fast &  Intertwined Regular Lanes (FAIR), HOT/C (HOT Credit Lanes), and have been piloted in Minnesota (MN),  Austin  (TX),  and Alameda  County  (CA)  and  through  analytical  studies  (Kockleman &  Kalmanje,  2005;  DeCorla‐Souza, 2006; FHWA, 2009; Lari, 2010).   Providing minimum access to the managed  lane for all  registered users  “would not only benefit users who  are deterred  from using  the  lanes  for monetary  reasons,  but  also  users  who  choose  not  to  use  the  lanes  for  philosophical  reasons”  (Southern  Environmental Law Center, 2013).    Discounts, exemptions, subsidies, or rebates can be employed to mitigate costs to select groups.   For  example, the Los Angeles Metro Express Lanes has recently established its “Toll Credit Program” which  will provide a credit to eligible low‐income households (twice the poverty rate) for account transponder  deposits or prepaid tolls.  Those enrolled in the program will have their account maintenance fee waived  as well.    Schweitzer  and  Taylor  (2008)  suggested  that  discounts,  as  is  done  by  utility  companies  for  qualifying customers, could be a feasible strategy.     Subsidizing  public  transportation  services  or  its  needed  infrastructure  and  equipment  may  offer  a  more feasible approach for benefitting affected low‐income people, albeit less directly.  Dedication of  a portion of  toll  revenues  to  finance  transportation  improvements,  such as expanded  transit  services  that may benefit  low‐income  travelers  through greater  frequency or higher quality services may offer  benefits that offset adverse impacts of toll facilities.  Funds can be used to improve express bus service 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 60  (e.g., I‐15 in San Diego or I‐95 Express Lanes in Florida) or to support transit, vanpools, or other forms of  transit (e.g., Washington State).   Transit vehicles use managed  lanes free of charge, but there must be  sufficient transit service for the corridor.   Using a portion of the toll revenue to fund transit service  in  the corridor ensures that an untolled option exists (Southern Environmental Law Center, 2013).  For toll  projects, mitigation could vary depending on the type of  impacts borne by EJ communities, but can be  contentious depending on the mode or route funded.     The  conversion  of HOV  lanes  to HOT  lanes  sometimes  results  in  increases  in  the  persons  per  car  occupancy  level  from  two persons  to  three persons  that can  ride  the  lane, affecting carpool usage.   This change  is a deterrent  to  the  formation of carpools and  likely  impedes usage of  the  lanes via  the  untolled  carpool  option.    Failing  to maximize  carpool  access was  a  concern  expressed  by  advocacy  organizations in Atlanta and San Francisco (Southern Environmental Law Center, 2013 and Hobson and  Cabansagan, 2013).      Select  systems  have  been  designed  to  ensure  that  people  without  access  to  credit  cards  or  bank  accounts are able  to use  transponders despite not having  credit or debit  cards.   Puerto Rico’s Auto  Expreso and Florida Turnpike’s SunPass are examples that permit reloading of transponders with cash  (e.g., through kiosk terminals at retail and other convenient  locations).   In Puerto Rico, a light on the  tag  signals  that  funds  are  running  low  in  the prepaid  accounts.   Customers  then have  the option of  replenishing their accounts at any number of  locations,  including gas stations (FHWA, 2008).   In Texas,  accounts may be opened with cash.  Replenishing accounts with cash must be done at customer service  centers, but TxDOT is seeking to expand the number of retail outlets available for TxTag services (FHWA,  2008).   Identifying convenient locations with this cash replenishment option provides a partial solution  for segments of  the population that have no bank account or no access to credit.   The New York City  Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has administered stated preference surveys, focus groups,  and videos to conduct market research on replenishment options (Campbell et al., 2011).    Mitigation can also take several forms relevant to addressing neighborhood, business, and economic  development  burdens  or  impacts  from  construction  and  operations  of  roadways.    These  forms  of  mitigation  are  described  in  several  of  the  reviewed  reports  (Forkenbrock,  2004;  Prozzi  et  al.,  2006;  Aimen and Morris, 2012) as well as other U.S. DOT and policy resource publications.  Once the affected  EJ  communities  understand  how  they  are  impacted  by  a  toll  road,  they  should  be  extended  the  opportunity  to participate  in problem‐solving  to mitigate or  remediate  the adverse  impacts  that  their  community may be bearing (Prozzi et al., 2006).  3.1.3.8  Defining “Disproportionate High and Adverse Impacts” and Documentation of Decision  The Guidebook and Toolbox provide key definitions of adverse effects and disproportionately high and  adverse  effects,  and  describe  the  criteria  for  determining  whether  EJ  communities  are  disproportionately  impacted  by  a  tolling  implementation  or  rate  change  action.    The  type  of  documentation that is expected to be presented to substantiate findings is also discussed.  An example  checklist is provided in the Toolbox to support documentation.  It is recommended that documentation  be initiated early in the process. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 61  Literature Review Observations  The articles  reviewed  include  references  to  the Executive Order 12898, U.S. DOT Order  (5610.2),  the  FHWA Order (6640.23), and other materials (e.g., FHWA’s FAQs on their website) that describe the key  criteria that must be considered to support a finding.  U.S. DOT Order (1997) and FHWA Orders (1998)  draw upon the scope of considerations of NEPA, 23 USC, Section 109(h), and Title VI in order to define  adverse effects  as  the  totality of  significant  individual or  cumulative human health or  environmental  effects,  including  interrelated social and economic effects.   These and other forms of guidance for the  literature  review  offer  instructive  definitions  for  the Guidebook,  including  recent  clarifying  guidance  issued by the FHWA (2011) that is paraphrased below:    Identification of existing minority and low‐income populations. o Minority:  Black  or  African  American,  Hispanic,  Asian  American,  American  Indian/Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. o Low‐income: DOT and  FHWA use  the Department of Health and Human  Services poverty guidelines. o Using  localized census  tract data and other  relevant  information sources, gather data and list any  readily  identifiable groups or clusters of minority or  low‐income persons  in  the EJ study area.  Small clusters or dispersed populations should not be overlooked. o When  there  is no minority or  low‐income populations  in  the  study area, no EJ analysis  is required. o Demographics presented should include the general population in the project study area as well  as  social  characteristics  (e.g.,  ethnicity,  age,  mobility,  and  income  level  of  the population).  These data elements, while not all required for an EJ analysis, are important to provide context for understanding area demographics. o When  it  has  been  determined  that  there  will  be  no  adverse  effects  on  identified  EJ populations by the proposed project [based on the EJ analysis], the NEPA document should reflect that determination. o When  there  are  minority  and  low‐income  populations  in  the  study  area  that  may  be adversely  impacted,  there  are  some  steps  to  follow  to  determine  whether  there  is  a disproportionately high and adverse impact on the population:  Explain  Coordination,  Access  to  Information,  and  Participation.    The NEPA  document  should include  discussion  of major  proactive  efforts  to  ensure meaningful  opportunities  for  public participation  including activities  to  increase  low‐income and minority participation.    Include  in the  document  the  views  of  the  affected  population(s)  about  the  project  and  any  proposed mitigation,  and  describe what  steps  are  being  taken  to  resolve  any  controversy  that  exists. Document the degree to which the affected groups of minority and/or low‐income populations have been  involved  in the decision‐making process related to the alternative selection,  impact analysis, and mitigation.  “Disproportionately high and adverse effects” are defined, per  the FHWA Order as  those  that are: predominantly borne by minority and/or low‐income populations; or will be suffered by the minority and/or low‐income population and is appreciably more severe or greater in magnitude than the adverse effect that will be suffered by the non‐minority or non‐low‐income population. o EJ considerations should be summarized in the appropriate section of the NEPA document; such  as  the  social‐economic  section  of  the  environmental  consequences  chapter.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 62  References  to  other  sections  in  the  NEPA  document  can  be  cited,  as  appropriate.    The  beneficial and adverse effects on  the overall population and on minority and  low‐income  populations, in particular, need to be addressed under the applicable topics (e.g., air, noise,  water pollution, hazardous waste, aesthetic values, community cohesion, economic vitality,  employment  effects,  displacement  of  persons  or  businesses,  farms,  accessibility,  traffic  congestion, relocation impacts, safety, and construction/temporary impacts).    o Compare  the  impacts on  the minority and/or  low‐income populations with  respect  to  the  impacts on the overall population within the project area.  Fair distribution of the beneficial  and adverse effects of the proposed action is the desired outcome.  o Under NEPA, consideration must be given to mitigation (as defined in 40 CFR 1508.20) for all  adverse effects  regardless of  the  type of population affected.   Discuss what measures are  being  considered  for  alternatives  to  avoid  or  mitigate  the  adverse  effects.    There  is  a  protocol  to  follow:  avoidance  first,  then minimization,  and  finally measures  to  offset  or  rectify  the adverse effects.   Using opportunities  to enhance and  increase  sustainability  in  communities and neighborhoods  is desirable.   Any activity that demonstrates sensitivity to  special needs should be highlighted, such as accommodations for transit dependency and/or  addressing the need for translators.  o If the effects remain adverse after mitigation  is considered, then a determination must be  made  whether  those  effects  are  “disproportionately  high  and  adverse”  with  respect  to  minority  and/or  low‐income  populations.    If  there  are  no  disproportionately  high  and  adverse effects on minority and/or low‐income populations once mitigation and benefits are  considered,  that determination should be stated  in  the document and  the EJ evaluation  is  complete.  If the effects on minority and/or low‐income populations are disproportionately  high and adverse even with mitigation and benefits to those populations taken into account,  the next section must be followed.   If there is a disproportionately high and adverse effect on an EJ population, after taking benefits  and mitigation  into  account,  the  NEPA  document must  evaluate whether  there  is  a  further  “practicable mitigation measure” or  “practicable  alternative”  that would  avoid or  reduce  the  disproportionately high and adverse effect.   FHWA will approve  the proposed action only  if  it  determines no such practicable measures exist, and the FHWA determination should be stated  in the document.     The  NEPA  document  needs  to  describe  how  the  impacted  populations/communities  were  involved in the decision‐making process.  The document needs to also identify what practicable  mitigation commitments have been made.   In addition,  if the affected population  is a minority population protected under Title VI, FHWA  will not approve the proposed action unless FHWA determines:  1. There is a substantial need for the project, based on the overall public interest; and  2. Alternatives that would have less adverse effects on protected populations have either:  a. Adverse social, economic, environmental, or human health impacts that are more  severe; or  b. Would involve increased costs of an extraordinary magnitude.   Where appropriate, the NEPA document must include both of these evaluations and contain the  FHWA determination on the explicit issues required within these evaluations. 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 63  3.1.3.9  Post‐Implementation Monitoring  The  Guidebook  and  Toolbox  describe  the  merits  of  periodic  monitoring  of  the  effect  of  toll  implementation  and  the  importance  of  assessing  the  impacts  of  rate  changes  directly  and  indirectly  upon users, including their equity effects.  The post‐implementation monitoring is warranted to review  to what extent anticipated or modeled effects were borne out after  the  fact.   Potential data sources,  survey and analytical methods, tools, and performance measures to carry out an empirical assessment  are presented.  To improve the state‐of‐the‐practice, such monitoring should probably be understood as  a commitment and condition of implementation of toll pricing solutions.    Literature Review Observations  Prior policy research studies have found that there was a limited amount of literature focusing on the  before‐after valuation of the environmental impacts of congestion pricing projects.  In its report to the  FHWA, Burt et al. (2010) also noted that authors of a 2008 FHWA evaluation of the Value Pricing Pilot  Program drew similar conclusions (K.T. Analytics, 2008).    One  means  for  addressing  this  gap  in  knowledge  would  be  the  use  of  an  equity  audit  tool  after  implementation of road pricing projects.  Through periodic monitoring of project effects, the success of  mitigation measures and whether differences in equity are being effectively addressed can be examined.   When  persistent  inequities  are  revealed  in  the monitoring  phase, modifications  to  road  pricing  and  mitigation can be subsequently made (Ecola and Light, 2009).    As  suggested  previously,  post‐implementation  assessments  have  been  relatively  limited.    These  studies  appear  to  report  on  the  utilization  of  the  facility  by  broad  income  segments  of  users  –  not  necessarily “low‐income” as defined under the U.S. DOT or FHWA Order on Environmental Justice.    In  focusing on utilization, they also do not tend to examine differences in individual or household financial  cost‐burden effects:     “An  early  evaluation  of  the  SR‐91  express  lanes  (Sullivan,  2000)  found  a  ‘moderate’  income  effect, with  the  percentage  of  trips  on  the  express  lanes  for  the  lowest  and  highest  income  groups  (20  percent  and  50  percent)  staying  the  same  over  the  3‐year  evaluation  period.   Evaluators  also  found  that  the use of  express  lanes  increased  over  time  for both  those who  carpooled  and  solo  drivers  across  all  incomes.    Low‐income  and moderate‐income  travelers  appeared to be more selective and used the tolled route for less than half of their trips.” (FHWA,  2008).   In the FHWA Primer (FHWA, 2008), reference is made to a prior FHWA Report (FHWA, 2005), on  HOT Lanes  that  reported  results  from  studies of SR‐91 express  toll  lanes  in California. “About  one‐quarter  of  the  vehicles  in  toll  lanes  are  driven  by  high‐income  individuals, whereas  the  remaining cars are driven by low‐ and middle‐income individuals.  It is estimated that 19 percent  of  the  peak  period  users  of  the  SR‐91  express  lanes make  less  than  $40,000  a  year,  and  42  percent make less than $60,000 a year.  Low‐income drivers do use the express lanes and are as  likely  to approve of the  lanes as drivers with higher  incomes.    In  fact, over half of commuters  with household incomes less than $25,000 a year approved of providing toll lanes.”   The Houston QuickRide project  found  that all  levels of  income used  the  facility, but also  that  lower‐income individuals were less likely to participate in the program (Burris & Hannay, 2003).    In its closing section, the FHWA Primer finds that congestion‐priced facilities will be used more by those  with higher incomes, but since all users will use priced lanes from time‐to‐time, “income‐related equity  concerns may not be entirely warranted.” The facilities meet drivers’ needs when they require a reliable  trip to reach their destination on time – for example, to avoid a late charge to pick up a child at day care 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 64  center.   Moreover,  there  is  little  variation  by  income  level  when  polling  is  conducted  (e.g.,  60–80  percent range).   All  income groups would appear to value the “insurance” of a reliable trip time when  they absolutely need it (FHWA, 2008).  Post‐implementation  evaluation  and  monitoring  is  an  important  feature  of  the  FHWA  UPA/CRD  programs.  The introduction of before‐after travel survey methods appear to validate the feasibility of  periodic equity assessment and compliance monitoring for examining the characterization of impacts  and  the effectiveness and  limitations of  toll  implementation.    In 2014,  the Volpe Center  (Ray et al.,  2014)  issued a  report  that presents  lessons  learned  from household  traveler  surveys administered  in  Seattle and Atlanta.  Using a two‐stage panel survey approach to analyze the before/after impacts of the  federally sponsored variable  tolling programs on corridor users’ daily  travel choices and opinions,  the  studies  indicate, as expected,  that pricing does  influence  travel behavior, particularly with  respect  to  route choice and the timing of trips.   Survey  findings focused on the equity  impacts of variable tolling  programs implemented on SR 520 in Seattle (UPA) and on I‐85 in Atlanta (CRD) were undertaken.   The  analysis  focuses  on  three  types  of  equity  impacts:  income,  geographic,  and modal.    Income  equity  impacts were greater  in Seattle, compared to Atlanta, as were geographic equity  impacts.    In Atlanta,  modal equity, as measured  through  impacts  to carpoolers, was a greater concern.    In conclusion,  the  type and intensity of the equity impacts differed across the two sites as a result of the differences in the  design of the pricing strategy as well as differences in regional context.         

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 65  3.2 Summary of Planning and Environmental Document Review During  Task  1,  the  Research  Team  began  to  identify,  collect,  and  systematically  review  regional  or  network  level and project  level documents, prepared on behalf of transportation agency sponsors, for  their treatment of EJ considerations in the implementation of toll projects and rate changes.  Paralleling  the  literature  review,  the content  review approach described here  seeks  to characterize  the  state‐of‐ the‐practice in identifying and addressing EJ on a range of tolling‐related projects.     The  documents  compiled  and  reviewed  include managed  lanes  system  plans,  regional  level  tolling  studies,  environmental  studies  (e.g.,  environmental  assessments,  environmental  impact  statements,  technical or discipline  studies,  categorical  exclusions,  findings of no  significant  impacts  (FONSIs),  and  national  evaluation  progress  reports  to monitor  commitments  and  changes  effectuated  through  toll  implementation.  These documents have been prepared by and on behalf of several sponsors, including  U.S.  DOT,  State  DOT,  Metropolitan  Planning  Organizations  (MPOs),  Regional  Mobility  Authorities  (RMAs), and tolling authorities, among others.    Through the content review, the Research Team was further able to review the state‐of the‐practice on  the treatment of EJ on tolling and pricing‐related decisions.  An element of the content review focused  on the context in which these various technical reports was prepared, including: type of document; type  of sponsoring agency or organization; geographic location; type of tolled facility and its features; pricing  and methods of payment; and type of decision and stage of decisionmaking.     The principal methods, processes, and findings that were reported as it pertains to EJ analyses were also  examined.   The content review explores how the report treats several themes and analytical activities,  including: the  identification of affected populations; public  involvement;  the use of travel surveys and  market  research;  regional  travel‐related modeling, measures,  and metrics;  traffic  diversion;  and  the  findings and criteria used to evaluate EJ impacts.  Table 5 and Table 6 identify the 24 reports that were  compiled  for  this  initial  content  review  screening.    In  presenting  this  content  review,  it  should  be  understood  that  the  state‐of‐the‐practice  characterization  was  subsequently  supplemented  through  interviews with select practitioners, agency decisionmakers, advocacy‐based and academic researchers,  and other subject matter experts  in a separate task.   The surveys and  interviews further  informed the  development of the Guidebook and Toolbox.   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 66  Table 5. Content Review Assessment of Technical Reports Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   Washington State DOT, 2009.  Environmental Justice Discipline  Report. SR 520: I‐5 to Medina Bridge  Replacement and HOV Project  Supplemental Draft EIS. King County,  Central Puget Sound Region, WA  Washington  State  DOT  X    X      •SR 520 Bridge  •New Toll  •All Electronic  Variable Pricing:  Time of Day  •Pay with  transponder  connected to a Good To Go! account  •Pay by license plate  capture connected to  a Good To Go!  account  •Pay by Mail (for  those without an  account)  Low‐income, minority and limited English proficient  populations were identified using census block‐level  data.  The study area was primarily focused within  King and southern Snohomish Counties and  specifically in areas directly adjacent to the bridge.  Some evaluation focused specifically on bridge users  Yes  Yes  Washington State DOT, July 2011,  Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement  Project Final Environmental Impact  Statement  State  DOT  X          Fully tolled facility  replacing an existing  route  Variable pricing: time of day  Electronic  transponders which  can be billed or paid  in advance with cash Discussions are presented throughout the report in  regards to different issues which including low‐ income, minority, Black/African American,  Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, Native  American, elderly, disabled, limited English proficient,  homeless, and limited mobility. However, the focus of the EJ review for tolling is limited to low‐income  populations. Social service agencies and transit  providers are key stakeholders that have provided a  great deal of input into the environmental review  process. More than 70 social service providers were  consulted during the public outreach program in  2001.  Yes  Yes  Washington State DOT, July 2011,  Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement  Project: Final Environmental Impact  Statement Appendix X: Tolling Re‐  evaluation Memo  Washington  FHWA &  Washington  State DOT  X          Fully tolled facility  replacing an existing  route  Variable Pricing:  Time of Day  Electronic  transponders which  can be billed or paid  in advance with cash Report references Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement  Project  Final EIS  Yes (in EIS) Yes (in EIS) 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 67  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   HDR Engineering, October 2013, MTC  Regional Express Lanes Interstate  680 Corridor: Environmental Justice  Technical  Memorandum  Metropolitan  Transportation  Commission  (MTC), Oakland,  CA  X          First phase of  regional network,  converting 24.4 miles of existing HOV lanes  to express lanes  (includes 3 bridge  approaches and I‐ 680 and I‐880)  Pricing of the tolls  was undetermined;  dynamic pricing is  the preferred  strategy  Primary: automatic  collection  (electronic) with  transponders;  Secondary: license  plate recognition  (LPR) cameras  capture vehicles w/o  transponder  Minority populations: in geographic units where 70%  or more of the population is identified as minority.  Concentrations of low‐income persons: where 30% or more within a geographic unit are below 200% of the  national poverty level. (MTC uses 200% due to  region’s high cost of living.)  Yes  Yes  California DOT, December 2013, I‐ 580 Eastbound Express Lanes  Project: Initial Study with Proposed  Negative Declaration/Environmental  Assessment  California DOT &  Alameda Co.  Transportation  Commission    X        HOV to HOT Lane  conversion along 12‐  mile corridor  Tolling a single lane  during peak hours  only. Carpools not  subject to toll  All‐electronic  transponders  (Fastrk)  No population groups were identified as possibly  impacted.  Yes (but  not for EJ  population s)  No  California DOT, October 2002, I‐15  Managed Lanes Final IS/EA and  Mitigated Negative Decision  California DOT    X        Expansion of I‐15 to  include 4 additional  Managed Lanes (Toll  for SOV)  Dynamic Pricing to  maintain a LOS of D  Electronic  transponder  Minority and low‐income population groups were  identified. Sub Regional Areas along and adjacent to  the I‐15 corridor were identified as the study area.  Yes  Yes  California DOT, The Interstate 10  (San Bernardino Freeway/El Monte  Busway) High Occupancy Toll Lanes  Project  California DOT    X        Conversion of High  Occupancy Vehicle  Lanes to High  Occupancy Toll Lanes Dynamic Pricing  contingent on traffic  conditions  All‐electronic  transponder.  Payment by cash,  check, credit/debit  or money order  The document identifies populations living within a  defined study area and includes demographic  information about the residents of the area.  Race,  income and housing status are also considered.  The  2009 Poverty Guideline from the US Department of  Health and Human Services defines the poverty  threshold.  Yes  Yes (limited  to meetings  of the  Corridor  Advisory  Group) 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 68  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   California DOT, July 2012,  Community Impact Assessment:  State Route 85 Express Lanes  Project, Santa Clara County, CA  California DOT &  Santa Clara  Valley  Transportation  Authority  X          Conversion of  existing HOV lanes to Express Toll Lanes for SOV (no toll for  HOV/Transit)  Dynamic pricing to  maintain free‐flow  Electronic  transponder  Minority and low‐income (HHS poverty) population  groups were identified by 2006‐2011 ACS data from  the census.  Census block groups within 1/2 mile of the corridor  defined the study area  Yes  Yes  California DOT, February 2010, The  Interstate 110 (Harbor  Freeway/Transitway) High‐ Occupancy Toll Lanes Project Draft  Environmental Impact  Report/Environmental Assessment  California DOT    X        Conversion of High  Occupancy Vehicle  Lanes to High  Occupancy Toll Lanes Dynamic Pricing  contingent on traffic  conditions  All‐electronic  transponder.  Payment by cash,  check, credit/debit  or money order  The document identifies populations living within a  defined study area and includes demographic  information about the residents of the area.  Race,  income and housing status are also considered.  The  2009 Poverty Guideline from the US  Department of Health and Human Services defines  the poverty threshold.  Yes  (limited to  comment  cards  following  present‐ ation)  No  Los Angeles Metropolitan  Transportation Authority, 2010.  Metro ExpressLanes Project: Draft  Final Low‐Income Assessment / LA  ExpressLanes Program, Los Angeles  County, CA  Los Angeles  County  Metropolitan  Transportation  Authority  X          •Convert existing  HOV lanes to HOT  Lanes on the I‐10  (from I‐605 to  Alameda Street) and  I‐110 (from Adams  Blvd. to Artesia  Transit)  •All‐Electronic  Congestion Pricing;  Variable Pricing  according to traffic  conditions to  maintain free‐flow  conditions  •FasTrak;  •Credit Card or Cash  required;  • Credit/Debit Card  to create an online  account  •Low‐income is defined in the authorizing law, SB  1422, consistent with other specified state and local  programs.  The final report recommends an individual low‐income threshold of  $35,000.  A sensitivity analysis is also included to  consider  $50,000 as the threshold in this report.  •Travel data from SCAG used to identify trip origins to determine the study area.  •No detailed mapping of low‐income locations.  •No consideration of minority populations.  No  No 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 69  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   Texas DOT, June 2014, SH 45SW  Environmental Study, Appendix F:  CAMPO Regional Toll Analysis (2013)  and Central Texas Regional Mobility  Authority Toll Policy.  Central Texas  Regional  Mobility  Authority, Texas  DOT, and Capital  Area  Metropolitan  Planning  Organization.      X      A network of existing and planned tolled  facilities. Planned  facilities will have  managed lanes.  The  change includes the  addition of highway  projects and  managed lanes.  Existing TxDOT and  CTRMA facilities  pricing is dynamic  and varies by road,  vehicle type, and  time of day. The  pricing scheme for  the planned  managed lanes is not described in detail.  Transponder cards  and pay by mail  Low‐income and minority populations.  No  No  Texas DOT, April 2013, Appendix E:  Project Level Toll Analysis and Effects  on Environmental Justice  Populations  FHWA, TxDOT,  Alamo Regional  Mobility  Authority.  X          The change includes improvements to US 281 between Loop  1604 and the Bexar  County Lane, and  three alternatives:  managed lanes (Toll  and HOV), fully tolled facility, or a  Not specified  Electronic transponders  Low‐income and minority populations.  Yes,  limited  reference  only  No  North Central Texas Council, June  2013, Regional Tolling Analysis for  the Dallas‐ Ft. Worth Metropolitan  Planning Area Based on Mobility  2035 ‐ Plan Update; Appendix B:  Social Considerations  MPO  X        X  Not specific  Not specific  Not specific  Low‐income, minority, disabled and limited English  proficiency.  2000 US Census data for block groups adjacent to the  highway/toll network were used.  Yes  No 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 70  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   North Central Texas Council, June  2013, Regional Tolling Analysis for  the Dallas‐ Ft. Worth Metropolitan  Planning Area Based on Mobility  2035 – Plan Update  MPO  X   X  Regional network of  planned  toll/managed  roadways  Combination of  dynamic, fixed and  peak period tolling  Transponders/tags  and video based  tolling  Low‐income and minority.  The MPO boundary was  used to define the study area. 2000 census data on  poverty, diversity and density was used.  Data was  assigned to TSZ units and each TSZ was classified for  EJ status  No  No  Alamo Area MPO, December 2011,  Appendix F: San Antonio – Bexar  County MPO (now referred to as the  Alamo Area MPO)  Regional Toll  Analysis  MPO  X  X  Not project specific;  series of potential  managed lanes and  tolls  Tolls based on  number of axles  Not specified  Low‐income, minority, disabled and limited English  proficiency populations within the San Antonio‐Bexar  County MPO.  2000 Census data was used to select  TAZs with greater than 50% minority and low‐income  populations  Not for  this report  No  Florida DOT, July 2013, St. Johns  River Crossing Project Development  and Environmental Study:  Environmental Discipline Report.  Florida DOT X   New limited access  highway and bridge  over the St. Johns  River will toll facility  Single price  Electronic transponder  Minority and low‐income populations were identified  using 2010 ACS census data.  Census blocks and tracts were selected by their location within a 1,500 foot  buffer from the proposed alignment  Yes  Yes  Georgia DOT, March 2013, Technical  Memorandum: Evaluation of Tolling  Effects on Low‐Income Populations:  I‐75 Express Lanes Project, I‐75  Express Lanes, Atlanta Metropolitan  Region, GA  Georgia DOT  X  X  •New Toll Facility •All‐Electronic •Variable Pricing of HOT Lanes  Variable Pricing of  HOT Lanes  No  •Focus on Low‐Income Populations.  No discussion of minority populations.  •Use of MPO (ARC)'s Travel Demand Model to define  boundaries based on use of facility  •Define Low‐Income as HHs Income less than $20K •Threshold defined as TAZs with more than   15% as  low‐ income  •The percentage of low‐income households in the 177 TAZs were broken down into quartiles and  mapped in relation to the facility.  No  No 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 71  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   Georgia DOT, January 2010, Atlanta  Regional Managed Lane System Plan,  Technical Memorandum 9: Social  Equity and Environmental Effects  Evaluation  Georgia DOT  X   Analysis of existing  toll network.  HOT/Managed Lanes Dynamic Pricing  Electronic Transponders  Low‐income, minority, disabled and limited English  proficiency.  2000 US Census data for block groups adjacent to the  highway/toll network were used.  No  No  North Carolina DOT, May 2013, I‐77  High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) Lanes  From I‐277 (Brookshire Freeway) to  West Catawba Avenue (Exit 28),  Mecklenburg County Federal Aid  Project NHF‐077‐I(209)9, WBS No.  45454.1.1 STIP Project No. I‐5405  USDOT (FHWA)  and NCDOT  X  conversion of the  existing HOC lanes to  HOT lanes as well as  the extension of the  HOT lanes in each  direction on I‐77  from I‐485 to West  Catawba Avenue.  Dynamic Pricing  Electronic transponders  Low‐income, minority, ethnic and limited English  proficient population are identified in the report  through census data. No other disadvantaged  populations are discussed in the report.  Yes  No  Virginia DOT, September 2011,  Environmental Assessment I‐95 HOT  Lanes Project  Virginia DOT X   Conversion of  existing HOV lanes to  HOT Lanes along I‐ 95, from just south  of US‐17 to I‐495  Dynamic pricing  depending on traffic  conditions.  Not defined  None  No  No  VDOT, December 2013, Interstate 64  Peninsula Study: Socioeconomic /  Land Use Technical Memorandum.  Virginia DOT  X  Convert existing  facility to full toll  lanes with additional  capacity  Not yet determined  Electronic Transponder  Census block groups that border the I‐64 corridor  were used to evaluate low‐income and minority  populations.  2010 and 2000 Census data was used.  US HHS poverty level used  No  No 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 72  Document Title  / Project Name /  Region  Project Sponsor  T e c h n i c a l   S t u d y   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   A s s e s s m e n t   E n v i r o n m e n t a l   I m p a c t   S t a t e m e n t   N a t i o n a l   E v a l u a t i o n   R e p o r t   R e g i o n a l   P l a n   &   T o l l   N e t w o r k   A n a l y s i s   T o l l   F a c i l i t y   &   T o l l i n g   C o n t e x t   P r i c i n g   A r r a n g e m e n t s   T r a n s p o n d e r   D i s c u s s i o n   I d e n t i f i c a t i o n   o f   A f f e c t e d   P o p u l a t i o n s   T h r e s h o l d   C r i t e r i a   &   B o u n d a r i e s   P u b l i c   I n v o l v e m e n t   R e f e r e n c e d   S u r v e y s ,   F o c u s   G r o u p s ,   a n d   I n t e r v i e w s   Maryland DOT, November 2004,  Intercounty Connector  Socioeconomic and Land Use  Technical Report  Maryland DOT  X   New limited access  highway connecting  I‐270 and I‐95 in  suburban MD  outside Washington  DC.  Variable tolls based  on time of day or  congestion, TBD  Not defined  Minority, low‐income populations identified at the  census tract level using 2000 census data.  Additional  demographic and income data from school  enrollment, low‐income housing and county social  services was also used.  Yes  Yes  Maryland DOT, May 2004,  Environmental Assessment Section  100: I‐95, I‐895(N) Split to North of  MD 43  Maryland DOT  X  4 new managed  lanes (2 in each  direction) along I‐95  north of Baltimore  Not defined  Not defined  Minority, low‐income and low‐moderate‐income  housing population groups were identified.  Census  2000 data was gathered at the census tract level for  demographic data.  Specific neighborhoods/housing developments were  identified.  No  No  Rhode Island DOT, January 2013,  Sakonnet River Bridge: Rehabilitation  or Replacement  Rhode Island  DOT & FHWA  X   Fixed tolls  implemented to  cover costs of new  bridge construction  and maintenance  Single Price  All‐electronic transponders  Minority and low‐income populations below the  poverty line were identified at the city and county  level using 2006‐2011 ACS census data.  Yes  Yes 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 73  Table 6.  Content Review Assessment of Technical Reports   D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t Washington State DOT, 2009.  Environmental Justice Discipline Report.  SR 520:  I‐5 to Medina Bridge  Replacement and HOV Project  Supplemental Draft EIS. King County,  Central Puget Sound Region, WA Washington State  DOT A variety of other project documents were used to map  potential impacts  (examples include air quality, ecosystems,  construction activities, etc.). This information was overlaid  with the EJ census blocks to determine impact areas. This  allowed for a comparison of  impacts among different groups. Not in this report, but  referenced in another Overall, it was determined that low‐income  populations  would experience disproportionately high and adverse  effects because of  tolling. The cost of the tolls would  present a burden to low‐income populations and social  service agencies that serve those populations.  However, if reasonable mitigation  strategies such as  those proposed  in the Mitigation  section of  this report  are adopted, they would minimize disproportionately  high and adverse effects on low‐income  populations. Establishment and use of electronic  benefit transfer cards which allow  low‐  income drivers to maintain a prepaid  account. The EJ analysis was a thorough approach. Future analyses should  identify a way of calculating the actual costs to EJ populations  compared with others.  Inclusion of an assessment of  individuals  who do not quality as EJ but are functionally low‐income  (“lower‐ income”) would be beneficial due to a high cost of living  in the  region. Washington State DOT, July 2011,  Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement  Project Final Environmental Impact  Statement Washington State  DOT A travel shed was used for  the Bored Tunnel Alternative to  determine characteristics of  the populations most  affected  by tolling the SR replacement facility. The tracts are mapped  along with alternative non‐tolled routes. Several alternative  routes are mapped  to show different options available for  population groups.  2030  vehicle travel times and transit  times are also discussed  in general concluding that travel  times would be approximately 18  to 24 minutes longer than  tolled SR 99. Tolling would  increase transit travel moderately  for  transit using general purpose traffic. Cost of transit is also  reviewed as a comparison to cost of the toll. Fares range  from  $1.75  to $4.75 depending on carrier as compared to  the $2.45  for  the toll. No The analysis of  the equity of tolling concluded that the  effects would not be disproportionately high and adverse  for  the following reasons: 1. Viable options for avoiding  the toll exists. 2. Acquisition of  transponders which could  cause adverse impacts  to EJ population can be minimized  or mitigated  through planning and design as well as  coordination with groups and agencies that serve EJ  population. No discussion on revenue recycling.  Mitigation strategies include  customer  service centers, cash or electronic benefit  payment, multi‐lingual PSAs, retail  outlets to serve low‐income customers,  information sharing with  social service  agencies, and promotion of rideshare.  Thorough analysis with  respect to a community impact standpoint;  however, the tolling analysis did not consider behavioral aspects of  how travel costs would  affect travel choice. Washington State DOT, July 2011,  Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement  Project: Final Environmental Impact  Statement Appendix X: Tolling Re‐  evaluation Memo FHWA &  Washington State  DOT The travel model used  is the Puget Sound Regional  Council's model. 2030  traffic data from the model was  used to estimate design year traffic. Yes (but not for EJ  populations) The report concludes “analysis of potential effects to  environmental justice populations since the 2011  Supplemental Draft EIS has found  the options to avoid  tolls and measures to make transponders available result  in no disproportionately high and adverse effects.”    “The reduction in effects (relative to the potential  effects discussed in the 2010  Supplemental DEIS) does  not merit  further supplemental NEPA documentation.” This report does not present final conclusions about potential  impacts in EJ communities. The referenced Social Discipline  report may have more  information regarding these impacts.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 74  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t HDR Engineering, October 2013,  MTC  Regional Express Lanes Interstate 680  Corridor: Environmental Justice Technical  Memorandum Metropolitan  Transportation  Commission  (MTC), Oakland,  CA Data Sources: MTC’s  regional travel demand model  (Travel  Model one), U.S. Census Bureau and American Community  Survey (ACS) data to determine the census tracts that include  EJ populations.  Analysis: Focus group meetings and intercept surveys,  relevant information from  other surveys on the use of HOV  lanes by low‐income  and minority populations via both  before and after implementation of managed lane projects,  no other metrics or measures were used. No The I‐680 Corridor  Project will not result in  disproportionate adverse direct impacts or  disproportionate adverse economic  impacts  to minority  and low‐income  populations. The analysis included an  evaluation of  impacts  from noise, visual, air quality,  displacement, land use, community facilities, and  community cohesion from  other technical reports for  the Corridor.  Note that transportation impacts on minority and  low‐  income populations were not directly evaluated at the  Direct Impact Area  level (census tracts within ¼ mile  of  the corridor), only environmental impacts. Also, because  no EJ communities of concern were identified for the  other larger study areas (due to large geographic analysis  unit ‐ county level), impacts on EJ communities outside  of  the Direct  Impact Area  were  not found  to have disproportionate adverse impacts on  EJ communities. No approaches specifically aimed at EJ  communities. General  incentives  offered:  One regional service center (SC) or  numerous retail locations. Permits  payment by cash or check to open the  account. Can replenish account by  mailing check or money order, or  payment in cash at SC. Can check account  balances, make one time payment, and  pay a violation  or invoice at numerous  Cash Payment Network (CPN) locations.  Can have “anonymous” accounts that do  not require personal identification.  Spanish‐ and Chinese‐ language  application pdfs online. Online customer  handbook. FasTrak® hours of operation  include Saturday mornings.  Other incentives for opening an account. The analysis was very thorough in methodology and approach,  research of comparable projects and  local travel patterns, and  public outreach to collect input of  low‐income  and minority  populations in the study area. As shown above, the EJ analysis  overall was very thorough and well developed  in many areas.  However, there was not sufficient attention given  to the impacts of  travel time based on whether users chose to take the express lanes  or regular lanes (no analysis presented). Additionally, the analysis  of  the Extended Resource Area at only the county level, and not a  smaller geographic area of analysis, was an oversight  that  prohibited a thorough evaluation of  the impacts  to EJ communities  in this larger study area. California DOT, December 2013,  I‐580  Eastbound Express Lanes Project: Initial  Study with Proposed Negative  Declaration/Environmental Assessment California DOT &  Alameda Co.  Transportation  Commission None No None No discussion of impact that paying the toll would have on low‐income  population No assessment of EJ or equity presented  in this document. California DOT, October 2002,  I‐15  Managed Lanes Final IS/EA and Mitigated  Negative Decision California DOT Low‐income and minority data from  SANDAG was used to  identify two EJ communities. Public outreach efforts were  targeted in these areas. Analysis from  these public  outreach efforts was used to inform the analysis. No The document finds that the impact  to EJ communities  would be minimal. An environmental significance  checklist was provided that described  if there would be  an impact  (Yes or No) and the level of significance  if  there was an  impact. Yes, transit service will be provided  in the  Managed Lanes Overall this document provides a good public outreach model  to  target efforts to engage EJ communities. Following the  identification of EJ communities in the data analysis, mailings,  meetings and other outreach efforts were targeted to two distinct  communities. In total, this assessment is  lacking in a few areas,  including identification of travel patterns of EJ populations and  other potential impacts.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 75  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t California DOT, The Interstate 10  (San  Bernardino Freeway/El Monte Busway)  High Occupancy Toll  Lanes Project California DOT Census data and the defined poverty level of 2009  were the  primary data sources.  More geographic refinement was  present with only tracts and block groups within  the study  area (1/4 mile  from  the corridor) used to identify potentially  impacted populations.  However, no true analytical methods  were applied.  No The report finds that there are benefits and negative  impacts to low‐income  and minority communities.  However, these impacts are presented as minor.  Recurring charges and fees associated with  the  transponder will  have a negative impact.  However,  traffic improvements are cited as a benefit for  these  communities as well. Yes, a suggestion to mitigate  the  transponder fees for low‐income  users.  Households within  five miles of  the  corridor that are low‐income would be  eligible for one such waiver per  household. Overall this document adequately identifies potentially impacted  communities at a sub‐county geographic  level.  However, there is  limited discussion on  the determination that low‐income  households within 5 miles of  the corridor will  be eligible for  the  transponder credit.  In addition, there is very little discussion on  how these communities would be adversely impacted aside from  their location within  the study area.  There is room for more  thorough and detailed analysis here. California DOT, July 2012,  Community  Impact Assessment: State Route 85  Express Lanes Project, Santa Clara  County, CA California DOT &  Santa Clara Valley  Transportation  Authority The analysis only consisted of  the demographic  information  and used ACS data to identify potentially EJ communities that  could be impacted.  EJ communities were defined as  50%+ minority and/or 25%+ low‐income. No Minimal  impact  to EJ communities was  identified.  The  report indicates that while the toll does place a higher  burden on  low‐income  users, the use of the tolling lanes  is a choice.  As such, low‐ income populations can  continue to use the non‐Express Lanes free of charge. No Overall the assessment makes a good effort to identify the EJ  community with demographic and spatial data.  The public  outreach component by VTA was thorough, although  it did not  specifically target the EJ communities identified in this final  assessment because the outreach was published prior to this  document.  However, the final justification that EJ communities  will have minimal  impact  is very weak and not clearly defined. California DOT, February 2010,  The  Interstate 110  (Harbor  Freeway/Transitway) High‐Occupancy  Toll Lanes Project Draft Environmental  Impact Report/Environmental  Assessment California DOT Census data and the defined poverty level of 2009  were the  primary data sources.  No true analytical methods were  applied.  The document discusses how transponders and tolls  could potentially impact  low‐income users. No The findings reported a minimal level of  impact because  Metro intends to provide a credit to acquire a  transponder as noted in the report.  The establishment  of the transponder credit was found to offset  any  potential impact for households that earn at or below  $35,000 and  live within 5 miles of the toll road. Yes, the transponder credit system  to  allow low‐income users the ability to  apply their transponder costs to the  initial toll payment. Overall the document lacks a complete assessment of  the  impacted communities.  There is no refinement of data from  the  county level to determine the location of low‐income  users.  There is  limited  discussion on  the determination that low‐income  households within 5 miles of  the corridor will  be eligible for  the  transponder credit.  There is room for more  thorough and detailed  analysis here. Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation  Authority, 2010.   Metro ExpressLanes  Project: Draft Final Low‐Income  Assessment / LA ExpressLanes Program,  Los Angeles County, CA Los Angeles  County  Metropolitan  Transportation  Authority Study uses PUMS data on commuters and also data from  MPO (SCAG) to determine the income distribution of HOV  lane users.  Reviewed trip data to determine origins  and  then coupled this information with county income statistics,  from the census, to identify the share of  trip origins  generated by low‐income  users. No •Study objective was to assess the impact of the  program on low‐income  users of  the facility. It found  substantial net benefits (defined as the benefits from  travel time savings minus  transit service operations  costs) from  the project. The net benefits are expected  to be positive even  if transit credits (waivers) are  provided to individuals with less than $35,000  annual  household income.  •Low‐income individuals would be less likely to  participate in the program, but would  likely use the  tolled facility in urgent situations only.  •Furthermore, they are likely to approve the facility  because of  transit improvements and credits. •Credit program to waive  initial  transponder fee for low‐income  users  was identified.  •Limited discussion of revenue strategies  to fund credits.  •  No commitments. It is a highly relevant study. It provides a number of metrics to be  used for  assessing the equity impacts of converting HOV to HOT.  It mentions several relevant data sources.  But, the study shows  that certain assumptions have to be made while assessing the  equity impacts.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 76  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t Texas DOT, June 2014, SH 45SW  Environmental Study, Appendix F: CAMPO  Regional Toll Analysis (2013)  and  Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority  Toll Policy Central Texas  Regional Mobility  Authority, Texas  DOT, and Capital  Area Metropolitan  Planning  Organization. 2005  median  family income levels provided by CAPCOG,  based on the 2005  Bureau of Economic Analysis Data to  calculate low‐income  thresholds;  2008  and 2009  poverty  data from  the Census Bureau to analyze poverty; and, 2005  ethnicity data, based on 2000  census data ethnicity ratios  applied to 2005  population data. No The finding  is that the implementation of the 2035 Plan  will benefit the EJ population.  Expanded  travel options  including an  improved transit service, emphasis on  mixed‐use, transit friendly growth  in activity centers,  many located  in EJ areas. The buses are exempt from  tolls. The report did not include explanation as to how the tolling might  influence trip network movements.   This could have provided a  greater  level of detail concerning EJ  implications.  The comparison  of  travel times between trips (of  the same origin  and destination)  that utilized toll roads and trips that did not utilize toll roads could  have been used to show disproportionate impacts between those  that are able to pay and those that are not. Overall, the adequacy  of the assessment is difficult to determine considering it was part  of a larger transportation plan that may have addressed other  issues of EJ. Texas DOT, April 2013, Appendix E:  Project Level Toll  Analysis and Effects on  Environmental Justice Populations FHWA, TxDOT,  Alamo Regional  Mobility  Authority. The SA‐BC MPO Regional Travel Demand Model was used to  conduct the analysis. The model used  input parameters  including speed and travel time based on observed congested  – peak‐hour – conditions. The model  then assigned trips to  roadways under these peak conditions, and reported  forecasted peak‐hour speeds and volume‐to‐  capacity (v/c)  ratios, and daily traffic volumes. Yes The findings were that both EJ and non‐EJ would benefit  from any of  the Build scenarios.  The travel times  increased with all build scenarios.  Although the EJ  population would be spending a greater portion of their  income on  the tolls as shown in the cost analysis, their  travel times would  still increase along the non‐ tolled  portion of  the toll way. There is a brief mention of a possible EJ  exemption of  the toll under the Alamo  Regional Mobility Authority tolling policy,  although this is not expanded on  further  within the document. The analysis is thorough, succinct, well‐organized, and clearly  presented.  The amount of detail given  as to the model used and  the variables used  in deriving the output provides a clear  understanding of  the methodology used.  The comparison of  alternatives, within  the context of  the modeling, also provides a  more thorough approach for  an EJ analysis than many EISs. The  access roads provide improved  travel times without the necessity of  a toll, which avoids EJ impacts.  An additional level of analysis could  have included the utilization of “On the Map”  to quantify the  assumed origins  and destination for  specific TAZs. Additionally, the  fact that the sources used to determine EJ populations were not  provided was an unfortunate oversight. North Central Texas Council,  June 2013,  Regional Tolling Analysis for  the Dallas‐  Ft. Worth Metropolitan Planning Area  Based on Mobility 2035  ‐ Plan Update;  Appendix B: Social Considerations MPO The analysis included a review of key system performance  measures, such as number of jobs accessible within 30  minutes by automobile or 60 minutes by transit and the  overall roadway level of service. No The metrics were relatively similar  for both protected  and unprotected populations.  They compared the  regional average by block group  and the total  population for each EJ population group, based on  2000 Census data.  This was done for each performance  measure. Not discussed The analysis never looked  at the direct impact of  tolled roads, but  instead looked  at general accessibility and performance measures  encountered by users based on whether they were originating  from  protected areas.  The impact of  toll roads would have supplied a  greater  level of possible impacts on people who are able to pay  versus those who are not.  Additionally, the report looks at public  input, but does not directly demonstrate the ways,  if any, that  public comment/input affected the outcomes of  the study or plan.  That being said, the accessibility analysis was a simple and effective  method of looking  at network impacts on EJ populations.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 77  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t North Central Texas Council,  June 2013,  Regional Tolling Analysis for  the Dallas‐  Ft. Worth Metropolitan Planning Area  Based on Mobility 2035  – Plan Update MPO Census data was used to identify four TSZ categories: low‐  income, minority alone, low‐income  & minority and non‐EJ.  Accessibility and Mobility performance measures were  evaluated to assess EJ and non‐EJ areas. No It was determined that the recommended transportation  projects included in Mobility 2035‐2013  Update do not have a highly adverse impact on  protected populations. Yes, recommendations include improved  access to transit, discounted fares/tolls,  HOV discounts, congestion management  and sustainable development to reduce  VMT. The performance measures were extensive and the analysis was  extremely comprehensive.  There was no mention of community  engagement throughout the entire document.  Given  that it  is a  technical analysis. Alamo Area MPO, December 2011,  Appendix F: San Antonio – Bexar County  MPO (now referred to as the Alamo Area  MPO)  Regional Toll Analysis MPO 2000 Census Block Groups with populations equal to or  greater than 50%  low‐income  or minority.  These were  allocated to EJ and non‐EJ TAZs. Additionally nine TAZs were  added that did not fall into the original  EJ category. They  were determined to be low‐income  areas based on the 2009  U.S. HHS Poverty Guidelines.  The analysis looked at potential  impacts  that tolled/managed lane facilities may have on  accessibility of all persons by analyzing  impacts on  travel  time choices of people residing in EJ  zones and Non‐ EJ  zones.  Yes There appeared to be no adverse impacts of  the  toll/managed lane future roadway system on EJ  populations, as the time savings were comparable for  trips form both categories of TAZs.  This was determined  due to fact that there was similar  average time savings  for  trips from  EJ and non‐EJ zones on both tolled and  untolled roadways. Buses and administration vehicles are  exempt from  tolls. Each toll project that  modifies an existing roadway or adds a  toll to an existing roadway is required to  provide non‐tolled capacity via non‐ tolled  lanes or a non‐tolled access road. The methodology directly linked the travel time increases between  toll and non‐tolled projects as well as the travel time increases  between EJ and non‐EJ areas. This seems to be the most  comprehensive linkage of impacts of  the methodologies reviewed  to date. Very  little was done in terms of providing best practices or  methods  for public participation, especially concerning methods  for  gaining  input from  EJ populations. Florida DOT, July 2013, St. Johns River  Crossing Project Development and  Environmental Study: Environmental  Discipline Report Florida DOT Only direct impacts were accounted for  as part of  the  environmental review. Then areas identified as minority  and low‐income  populations with meaningfully greater  populations than the ROC where considered to determine  if disproportionate impacts were being suffered by the  affected populations.  Yes All six alternative was examined for effects of  tolling  both low‐income  population and minority populations.  Impacts varied by alternative. No The analysis relies heavily on comparing demographic data for  affected block groups  to the ROC.  The travel behavior analysis is  limited to travel distance. The assessment overall  is very limited  with respect to travel behavior.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 78  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t Georgia DOT, March 2013,  Technical  Memorandum: Evaluation of Tolling  Effects on  Low‐Income Populations: I‐75  Express Lanes Project, I‐75 Express Lanes,  Atlanta Metropolitan Region, GA Georgia DOT •ARC’s Travel Demand Model  ‐ Select Link Analysis;  Trips household is  likely to make over the course of a typical  weekday;  •Relationship between various HH  income variables and  express lane trip‐related variables using statistical significance, mapping, and/or regression analysis.  •Key Metric: Express  lane trips per TAZ. •Usage rates from  low‐income areas were not statistically  different than usage rates from high‐income areas. No •"The analysis show that there are projected trips  coming from low‐income  areas that use the express  lanes, based on the select link analysis output of the  regional travel demand model...  “The subsequent  statistical analysis demonstrates that express lane usage  rates from  low‐income areas are not statistically  different than usage rates from high‐income areas... the  benefits of  the I‐75 Express Lanes are likely to be  enjoyed by users irrespective of  income level.”  •The benefits accrue to all users of  the managed  lanes, regardless of  income, and to all users of  the general  purpose lanes, regardless of  income, as a result of the additional corridor capacity.  •"...implementation of new tolled capacity is  anticipated to generate adverse, but not  disproportionately high impacts  to the low‐income  community.” No mitigation discussed; •Travel demand model does not segment trips by income level  (all trips from  all income levels were represented in each TAZ's express lane trips). Individual trips were not associated with a  particular income level, so direct linkages of  impacts for  low‐  income individuals was not conducted.  •General statements made that all incomes have been shown to use toll roads; references other case studies to bolster argument that toll roads will  be used when needed by low‐income  individuals.  •No discussion of  relative cost burden of  the trip on low‐income households.  •The  analysis did not  have  survey  input of  EJ  communities  to determine  the  extent  to which  communities would  value  the  option of  toll lanes. Georgia DOT, January 2010,  Atlanta  Regional Managed Lane System Plan,  Technical Memorandum 9: Social Equity  and Environmental Effects Evaluation Georgia DOT The core of the analysis involved identifying block groups  adjacent to tolled roads and highways.  The individual  corridors were compared to see if there were higher level  of minority or  low‐income populations within  these pre‐  identified block groups. These block groups were  determined to have a percentage of minority populations if  the African‐American population was greater than 45%  or  if  the Hispanic populations was greater than 9%.   They were  considered to be low  income if more  than 9% of the  population fell below the poverty line.  No The study found  that managed lanes are not price  discriminate; everyone pays the same to get the same  travel time benefits. The level of  impact  for  the Atlanta  region was never fully analyzed.  The report seemed to  provide the DOT and the MPO block groups  that should  be analyzed to determine impacts in the future, instead  of providing an overall conclusion on  the current level of  equity in the existing system. Yes.  To balance impacts the report  recommends to direct revenue collected  on managed  roadways  for use on  transit  services.  They also recommend some  form of cash payment, in addition to the  transponders, as some  users may not  have bank accounts. The analysis is  lacking in data, methods, and approach.  The  referenced study is a review of case studies with supplemental  information concerning the make‐up of populations that live  near  Atlanta highways. Using block groups  as the smallest unit of  geography, adjacent to the highways, could overlook some EJ  populations. There is no travel data, and no analysis of mobility,  accessibility, or travel impacts. North Carolina DOT, May 2013,  I‐77 High  Occupancy/Toll (HOT) Lanes From I‐277  (Brookshire Freeway) to West Catawba  Avenue (Exit  28), Mecklenburg County  Federal Aid Project NHF‐077‐I(209)9, WBS  No. 45454.1.1  STIP Project No.  I‐  5405 USDOT (FHWA)  and NCDOT None discussed No Report states “no disproportionately high and adverse  impact to low‐income/or minority populations would  occur as a result of  implementing  this project”.  There is  further discussion about how the project would  impact  three areas of equity: income, modal and participation;  however no disproportionate impacts were highlighted. None of  these were addressed but the  report noted that consideration of  providing transponders at low  or no cost  to low‐income commuters, and allowing  cash payments for people who do not  have debit or credit cards may allow easy  and convenient access. There are clearly low‐income  and minority population affected but  there is no analysis to substantiate the claim that there are no  disproportionate impacts except to cite other studies that concluded  these type of HOV to HOT conversion do not affect EJ populations. Virginia DOT, September 2011,  Environmental Assessment  I‐95 HOT  Lanes Project Virginia DOT None No The report finds that there are no  low‐income  or  minority populations that would  suffer  disproportionately high or adverse effects from  the  project. No This document appears very deficient and  incomplete in defining  any EJ communities or populations.  There is no discussion or  presentation of any communities or maps presented to identify the  locations of EJ populations.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 79  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t VDOT, December 2013, Interstate 64  Peninsula Study: Socioeconomic / Land  Use Technical Memorandum. Virginia DOT No other methods presented other than those to identify  populations. Yes For all alternatives, EJ populations would not be  impacted disproportionately compared to non‐EJ  groups.  Tolls  are not expected to have a  disproportionately high and adverse impact on EJ  populations. No The analysis that “determine[d] how potential impacts and benefits  to the total population would  affect the EJ populations” gave no  criteria or metrics to establish what would be considered impacts or  benefits and  it also provided no criteria for how to gauge the level  of  impacts or benefits.  While  the analysis is qualitative, more  supporting documentation and  information should have been  provided about the conclusions presented  (e.g., how toll facilities benefit all drivers regardless of  income if  low‐income drivers may not utilize the facility in the first  place?  What parallel local roads could be used and what would  the time  “costs” of using these local roads be vs.  the toll road?).  Without  any criteria/metrics or supporting information, the conclusion is  unsubstantiated. Maryland DOT, November 2004,  Intercounty Connector Socioeconomic  and Land Use Technical Report Maryland DOT A map analysis was conducted to identify what  environmental effects would be disproportionate for EJ  communities.  Potential adverse impacts were mapped  against the location of  identified EJ communities.  The  analysis did not fully consider travel‐related impacts as the  final tolling determination was not available at the time of  this report. No The EJ communities were evaluated according to:  residential displacement, property acquisition, access  and mobility,  community cohesion, noise, visual and  aesthetic character & parks and community facilities.  In comparing impacts  in the EJ communities with other  communities according to these metrics, no  disproportionate impact was found. No This report uses one of  the broadest arrays of data to identify EJ  populations.  Beyond census data, school, housing and community  service data was  incorporated to identify the location of EJ  communities.  The report is reviewing a project that still has many  options, no build vs. build and an array of routes to be selected; all  without a defined toll structure.  As such, it was very limited in the  presentation of travel impacts and other potential impacts to EJ  communities.  However, the robust data deployed and geographic  presentation was strong. Maryland DOT, May 2004,  Environmental  Assessment Section 100: I‐95, I‐895(N) Split  to North of MD  43 Maryland DOT The analysis did not fully consider travel‐related impacts as  the final tolling determination was not available at the time  of this report.  Rather construction related impacts were  considered in EJ communities compared to all corridor  communities No The analysis here largely centered on other  construction related impacts to EJ communities.  The  analysis found  that there was no disproportionately  high impact  to EJ communities compared to other  communities in the corridor. No This document was prepared prior to the identification of a tolling  strategy and therefore has little documentation on potential tolling  impacts within EJ communities.  However, there is robust  presentation of other construction related impacts on EJ  communities, including low‐moderate income housing  developments.  This is a thorough and detailed approach that  identifies impacts at the neighborhood/housing development  level as opposed to a census geography.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 80  D o c u m e n t   T i t l e     /   P r o j e c t   N a m e   /   R e g i o n P r o j e c t   S p o n s o r D a t a     S o u r c e s ,   A n a l y t i c a l   M e t h o d s   &   R e g i o n a l   T r a v e l ‐ R e l a t e d   M e a s u r e s   &   M e t r i c s T r a f f i c   D i v e r s i o n   R e f e r e n c e d E v a l u a t i o n   o f   E J   I m p a c t s R e v e n u e   R e c y c l i n g ,   O t h e r   M i t i g a t i o n ,   &   C o m m i t m e n t s A s s e s s m e n t Rhode Island DOT, January 2013,  Sakonnet River Bridge: Rehabilitation or  Replacement Rhode Island DOT  &  FHWA 2010 Census, 2011  ACS 5 year. A travel demand model was  created for 2030  conditions taking into account the new toll.   The model provided estimates for  total trips, VMT,  and  VHT. The details of  the model used or the variables identified  are not included in the report.  The study only looked at  municipalities as origins  and destinations and determined  that the only two municipalities with a higher proportion of  EJ populations were not impacted by the tolling project.  No The finding was that EJ populations did not incur  disproportionate impacts. No The report lacked a thorough approach and hard data.   In the EJ  section, there were no comparisons made to other studies looking  at similar  roadway specific tolling projects.  EJ populations were  only analyzed at the city level (while demographics at the census  tract level were  included in an appendix they were not discussed  in  the analysis), and they used the minority/low  income ratios  compared with  the state population as their main method of EJ  analysis.  The planning process included a questionnaire and two  meetings, but none of the results of  the questionnaires were  included in the report (The report pointed toward a memo  concerning the results, but the appendix was not included in the  report).  Additionally, there was not attempt made to account for  representation of EJ populations at the workshops.  The analysis  was never brought to a level of synthesis.   

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 81  3.2.1 Geographic Distribution The 24 selected documents included in this initial scan of the practice came from a broad range of places  across the country, reflecting  initiatives  in many regions of the country,  including: the West (California  and Washington),  Southwest  (Texas),  Southeast  (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina,  and Virginia), Mid‐ Atlantic (Maryland) and Northeast (Rhode Island).  In addition to the nationwide distribution of projects,  the  geographic  scale of  the projects  varied as well with  some  regional  in  scope, with  impacts across  metropolitan areas, while others were facility‐specific, alignments within a larger regional context.        3.2.1.1   Tolling Facility and Tolling Context      The  toll  facilities  under  study  varied widely,  ranging  from  a  new  toll‐only  limited  access  roadway  in  Maryland  to  the  rehabilitation  or  replacement  of  a  bridge.    Several  documents  included  projects  to  convert high‐occupancy vehicle  lanes to managed toll  lanes, primarily  in the state of California.   Other  documents were network level studies (e.g., in Texas) that presented findings based on the adoption of  tolling  facilities within  a metropolitan  area.    These  studies were,  in  some  cases,  then  referenced  as  supporting documents for facility‐specific projects.  Broad variation among the tolling facility and tolling  context has an impact on the methods applied in the identification of EJ populations and effects.    3.2.2 Pricing Arrangements The pricing arrangements described by the project documents vary widely with some documents lacking  any defined pricing arrangement  for analysis as  those  features had not yet been determined.   Other  projects  examine  a  single  fixed‐rate  toll,  or  proposed  time  of  day  variability  or  dynamic  pricing  to  maintain a specified level of service and mitigate delays.  While the scope of the presentation of pricing  arrangements varied across the project document – perhaps reflecting the lack of ripeness at the time of  the study, pricing should be a key component of EJ review considerations.  Preparers should present the  options under  consideration  and weigh  the potential  impacts  to  the  EJ  communities,  although  there  little evidence of consistency in this treatment in the documents reviewed.    3.2.3 Transponder Discussion Transponders and their associated toll account policies were mentioned in a number of the documents  reviewed  by  the  Research  Team.    The majority  of  the  project  documents  reviewed  indicated  that  electronic tolling transponders would be deployed to collect fares.   Some project documents  indicated  that other means for collection, such as video transactions reading license plates, would be considered.   Further,  some project documents discussed prospective policies  and  account    replenishment options  (i.e., cash, check, debit/credit) and methods  (online, mail,  in‐person) to provide a range of choices for  customers.    In some reports that provided this  level of  information, the  impact on EJ populations was  considered; however, this was far from universally the case.  Still other documents, as  indicated previously, did not  indicate a  transponder/toll collection device or  account replenishment option  that would be used.   These documents oftentimes had not determined  the final alignment of projects nor pricing arrangement, leaving the final decision pending.  This lack of  definition resulted in a limited assessment for potential impacts in EJ, and in particular, to low‐income or  underbanked and unbanked populations.      3.2.4 Identification of Affected Populations, Threshold Criteria, and Geographic Boundaries Nearly all of the technical studies and reports reviewed make use of demographic information from the  U.S.  Census  Bureau.    Predominantly,  this  data  is  used  to  determine  low‐income  and  minority  populations.  In nearly all of the studies reviewed, “low‐income” is defined using the poverty threshold 

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 82  used by the Census Bureau as defined by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data from  either  the  decennial  census  or  the  American  Community  Survey  was  used,  depending  on  data  availability.      While minority and low‐income populations, in accordance with the DOT and FHWA Orders, are  the  focus  of  demographic  discussions  as  part  of  the  community  identification  process,  some  studies  also  sought  to  identify  other  disadvantaged  populations.    Other  disadvantaged  populations  included  persons with  limited  English  proficiency,  Foreign‐Born  populations,  and  person with  disabilities  reported  by  the U.S.  Census.   Other  data  sources were  occasionally  referenced  –  for  example,  low‐  and moderate‐income  housing  developments,  drawing  upon  local housing agency data, or data maintained by  social  service providers  (e.g.,  special needs,  employment) or educational  institutions  (e.g., free and reduced price  lunches).   These sources  were used  to provide  further  insight  into  social  service or  transportation needs of  specific EJ  communities, or to discuss homeless or unbanked populations.  On select occasions, the report  referenced other stakeholders and public involvement processes to inform the identification of  affected populations.  Other stakeholders might include transit or social service providers.     Definitions and methods for identifying affected populations or communities of concern through  spatial mapping  greatly  vary.    First,  the  selection of  the  “study  area”  in many of  the  studies  refers  to  a  buffered  area  surrounding  the  proposed  improvement/toll  implementation.   Oftentimes these buffered areas ranged in size, from as small as 1,500 feet to a ½ mile.   While  many current and/or potential facility users may begin future trips from this area, it represents a  small segment of the catchment area of potential users.       The  Metropolitan  Transportation  Commission  (MTC)  in  the  San  Francisco  Bay  Area,  in  recognition of this, makes use of the following definitional criteria for establishing study areas  and the region of comparison:   o Direct  Impact Area  (DIA):  the  area most  likely  to  experience  the potential direct  impacts  from the project construction and operation; this includes all census tracts within ¼ mile of  the I‐680 corridor.  o Extended Resource Area (ERA): which includes the likely users of the proposed express lane  facility; this includes the entirety of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties.  o Region  of  Comparison  (ROC):  the  study  area  identified  for  the  MTC  Program,  used  to  determine  if potential project‐related adverse  impacts are disproportionate  in comparison  to the greater area; this includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, and Santa Clara Counties.   (Santa Clara County was added because part of the express lane extends into this county.)  While terminology differs, Washington State DOT similarly defined a project study area to  determine the effect of project construction and operations on the human environment within a  specified distance of the construction limits, including the effects on residents and people who  work in the project study area.  Analysts also used the Evergreen Point Bridge “travelshed study  area” to understand the effects of tolling on bridge users.  This travelshed study area includes  the larger geographic catchment area from which traffic on the Evergreen Point Bridge  originates.  MTC’s regional travel demand model (Travel Model one) was used to review regional travel  patterns and identify the area most affected by the express lanes within the MTC Regional  Express Lanes Program (MTC Program).  A “select link” analysis was performed to identify the 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 83  travel patterns of all Bay Area residents on a typical weekday and to estimate the traffic flow on  every major roadway in the region.   The selection of geographic units of analysis varies widely among the reviewed technical studies, ranging  from high  level  county or MSA  statistics used  for EJ community  identification  to very granular at the census block level.  Some studies elect to employ travel analysis zones used for travel demand modeling by the MPO.  The geographic unit selection also has an impact on the study area definition.   Some  studies elect  to  include  census geographic units  that  intersect a buffered area of the corridor.  Others use only those units that are mostly or entirely within the buffered area.  Most  studies  identified  the  thresholds  that were used  to  determine what  constituted  an  “EJ community” or community of concern.  There is no uniform method for establishing the census geography or criteria for making this threshold determination.  In several cases, the criteria used to  identify small area census geography  (e.g., census blocks, block groups, or tracts) with high concentrations  of  minority  and  /or  low‐income  populations  was  developed  based  on  the guidelines  established  by  the  Council  on  Environmental Quality  (CEQ)  report,  Environmental Justice Guidance under  the National Environmental Policy Act.    In  such  cases,  the  small  area census geography was identified (and mapped) as a high‐concentration minority area where the minority  population  was  greater  than  50%,  and/or  where  this  census  geography  had  a “meaningfully  greater”  percentage  of  minority  individuals  than  the  region  of  comparison. Similarly,  census  tracts were  identified  as  “low‐income” when  the  percentage  exceeded  the region of  comparison average or  reached  some numerical  threshold  (e.g., 25% of  individuals) below the poverty level. In these studies, little discussion was given to the potential for overlooking EJ populations based on  the  size  of  the  geographic mapping  unit  or  the  threshold  criteria  used.    FHWA  guidance warns of an overreliance on threshold methods, particularly  in project development stage, for an EJ assessment, for identifying smaller clusters of low‐income and minority populations. A  “majority‐minority”  region  such  as  San  Francisco  might  require  other  definitions  –  for example, minority is defined as places with greater than 70% minority.  Similarly, the high cost of living in the San Francisco Bay Area region led MTC to establish a “low‐income” definition of 200%  above  the  nation’s  poverty  level  and  low‐income  communities  with  30%  or  greater concentrations of  low‐income persons.    In  the Atlanta metropolitan  area, block  groups were over the threshold  if the African‐American population was greater than 45%, or  if the Hispanic population was greater than 9%.   They were considered to be  low‐income  if more than 9% of the population fell below the poverty line within the census tract. 3.2.5 Public Involvement Referenced Public  involvement was  referenced  to  varying degrees.    Some  reports mentioned public  involvement  strategies that were part of the report development process designed to solicit  input/feedback as part  of the document generation.  Some reports included public involvement but to a lesser degree; making  reference  to  other  reports  that  included  an  outreach  or  survey  component  and merely  citing  the  outcomes/findings.   The remaining reports did not  include any public  involvement component, neither  conducted as part of the process nor referenced in another study/report.    

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 84  3.2.6 Surveys, Focus Groups, and Interviews Implementation of surveys, focus groups, and interviews also spanned a broad spectrum.  On occasion,  informal or  convenience  surveys were administered during public  involvement events  to  solicit  input  and  feedback.   Often  these reports  indicated  that participants were provided comment cards  to offer  feedback.    In  a  few  of  the  report  documents  that were  reviewed,  there were  discussions  of  some  targeted efforts  to provide  information  and  solicit  feedback  from  EJ  communities.    Staffing  tables  at  supermarkets  in EJ communities or  targeted  interviews with EJ  community  leaders or members were  undertaken  to  solicit  feedback  directly  from  impacted  communities.    Some  report  documents  highlighted  the  creation  of  small  focus  groups  of  stakeholders,  community members,  or  other  key  parties  to  provide  insight  on  the  potential  impacts  of  the  proposed  tolling  facilities/projects.   A  few  report documents also indicated that interviews were conducted.     3.2.7 Data Sources, Analytical Methods, and Regional Travel‐Related Measures and Metrics The data sources, analytical methods, and regional travel‐related measures and metrics covered by the  report  documents  reviewed  by  the  Research  Team  varied  broadly.    As  the  focus  of  each  report  document is unique for its community and project type, the data sources and analysis methods are quite  specific in each instance.      Several reports lacked analytical rigor in making their assessment of EJ impacts, doing little more  than  identifying and mapping  the  location of  low‐income and minority populations.   The data  sources and methods presented for these reports is generally census information overlaid with  project  boundaries  and  defining  thresholds  for  poverty  and  minority  status  determination.   These reports did not include much travel‐related information.      Those report documents that had not identified pricing and other toll implementation attributes  in particular did not  include  information on  travel‐related measures perhaps due  to a  lack of  information at an early  stage  in  the planning effort, or perhaps because adverse effects have  been  categorically  dismissed  as  an  issue  through  reference  to  other  studies  (particularly  on  “partial pricing” or managed lane) corridors.     Some reports did make reference to the use of the MPO’s travel demand models, which were  used  to  model  trips, mode  choice,  and  route  assignment.    There  is  very  little  information  contained in the reviewed EJ section or discipline reports explaining how the models may have  been refined, if at all, to assess the travel‐related impacts to EJ communities.     While not an explicit modeling example, the Metro ExpressLanes Project: Draft Final Low‐Income  Assessment was among the more unique of the report documents examined, by  incorporating  data  from  the  region’s MPO  on  income  distribution  of  HOV  lane  users  to map  origins  and  destinations  of  EJ  communities.    Some  documents  –  for  example,  Texas,  Louisville‐Kentucky  Ohio  River  Bridges  and  Washington  State  –  examined  the  user  costs,  or  financial  burden  presented by tolling on low‐income commuting households, but this was not a typical reported  metric of many planning and environmental studies, although it perhaps should be.     Beyond assessing travel user  impact effects, some of the EJ reports were more comprehensive  or  thorough  than  others  in  assessing  and  mapping  the  social,  economic  and  natural  environmental effects of the project corridor’s physical improvements or changes.   Thus, some  of  the  reports  assessed  the  full  range  of  environmental  topics  (e.g.,  land  displacement,  air  quality, noise) and overlaid the impacts with the identified EJ communities to determine project  impacts specifically within these communities.  The Environmental Assessment report prepared  by Maryland DOT (i.e., Section 100: I‐95, I‐895 (N) Split to North of MD 43) is a good example of 

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 85  a  report  that used  impact  information  to gauge  impacts  in EJ  communities.   This  report  also  used  low‐income  housing  development  data,  in  addition  to  census  data,  to  identify  specific  neighborhoods that could be impacted.   Although  many  EJ  evaluations  were  not  comprehensive,  a  few  planning  and  project  level  technical reports of EJ analysis did appear to do a complete or comprehensive EJ analysis in that  it was very clear how the technical analyses and evaluation of the performance measures led to  the  final evaluation of EJ  impacts.   Several of  these projects benefited  from  the  fact  that  the  proposed  project  was  adding  so  much  additional  capacity  via  HOT  lanes  and/or  transit  improvements  that  in  the  future, both  the  tolled  and non‐tolled  lanes offered better  service  than the no build condition (Texas regional or project level analyses).      The EJ analysis within the Washington State DOT Environmental Justice Discipline Report for SR  520 (2009) also had a very thorough approach and analysis that incorporated both interviews of  social  service  agencies  that  serve  low‐income  populations  and  travel  time  impact  analysis  of  both vehicular and transit routes from different areas of the city.    3.2.8 Traffic Diversion Very  few of  the  reviewed  reports discussed  traffic diversions attributable  to pricing effects.   Of  those  that did mention traffic diversions, there was little association of these traffic effects as they may affect  EJ communities.    3.2.9 Evaluation of EJ Findings The majority of  the  reviewed  reports  found  that adverse  impacts  to EJ  communities  imposed by  the  proposed  tolling  project would  be minimal,  or were  not  disproportionately  high  and  adverse.    The  reports, based on their individual methodologies, data analysis techniques, and assessment of impacts,  used varying methods and metrics for quantifying the impacts.  As many of the projects were in various  decision‐making  stages on  the  tolling  facility  and  pricing  arrangement,  there  is wide  variation  in  the  review  of  tolls  on  EJ  communities.    In  some  cases, mitigation  strategies were  cited  as measures  to  address an otherwise adverse impact on EJ communities.  However, not all projects reviewed contained  mitigation strategies at arriving at their findings.  3.2.10 Assessment While  some  of  the  reports  reviewed  by  the  Research  Team  presented  robust methods  and  data  to  identify, map,  and  contextualize  EJ  communities  within  the  proposed  project  area,  several  reports  appeared to be deficient in the analysis of data to support their findings.     Overall there appeared to be room for more thorough and comprehensive analysis and inclusive  approaches in considering EJ impacts.      Several studies provided  little documentation of how public  involvement processes were used  to  inform  the  identification  of  affected  populations,  their  needs  or  concerns,  or  prospective  impacts.   While  there  is  significant  variation  in  the  types of  studies  reviewed,  several  technical  reports  lacked  sufficient  analysis of  travel behavior  related  impacts by  income  segment.   Only  a  few  relied upon travel‐related surveys or focus groups to derive findings.     In several cases, select research studies on partial pricing  (i.e., HOT  lanes) were referenced  to  find no disproportionately adverse  impacts based on  the  fact  that all populations may at one  time or another make use of the priced lanes.    

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 86   Little  attention  was  given  to  the  household  financial  burden  of  a  traveler  based  upon  the  proportion of income spent in travel.       Several EJ analyses appeared to share a deficiency in that they provided only limited specificity  as to toll schedules (i.e., pricing levels) and toll account management policies and features (e.g.,  deposit, purchase, monthly fee, minimum balance, replenishment options).  Given the timing of  planning  and  NEPA  studies,  it  may  not  be  possible  to  fully  define  all  pricing  and  account  management policies; however, the absence of definition appears to undermine the basis for a  finding of no significant adverse  impacts as  it relates to  low‐income households willingness to  use  transponders,  in  particular.    Subsequent  changes  in  the  project  design  elements  –  for  example, actual toll fees, toll  increases, marketing and distribution of transponders, and actual  pricing and account policies  (such as minimizing  fees  for cash or  in‐person credit  transponder  reloading,  alternate  transponder  purchase  and  reload  facilities,  etc.)  are  factors  that  can  influence transponder usage and an evaluation of EJ impacts.      This lack of certainty may be precisely what should warrant a post‐implementation commitment  to assess and monitor  the  impacts of  the  toll  implementation upon  low‐income and minority  populations.   Where  little definition  is given  in  the environmental  review phase  reflecting  the  plans  for  such  a  critical  factor  as  toll  account  policies  affecting  low‐income  populations,  or  where  circumstances may markedly  change after environmental approvals,  it  seems essential  that  agencies  commit  –  as  a  condition  of  environmental  approval  –  to  further  post‐ implementation monitoring to reexamine the impacts of toll implementation upon low‐income,  minority and other disadvantaged populations  such as  limited English proficiency populations  and persons with disabilities.       

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 87  3.3 State‐of‐Practice Interviews: Perceived Gaps and Needs for Guidance The  Research  Team  conducted  interviews  with  agencies  and  practitioners  from  state  DOTs, MPOs,  tolling  agencies,  consulting organizations,  advocacy‐based organizations  and  academic  researchers  to  supplement the literature review and the content review assessments.  The interviews were intended to  probe  the practitioners’ perspectives garnered  from prior work  related  to EJ and  tolling as well as  to  identify  the  primary  needs  and  tools  for  inclusion within  a  guidebook  and  toolbox.    The  screening  questions,  interview  guides  and  protocols  are  consolidated  in  Appendix  C.    Key  observations  that  emerged from the interviews illuminated perceived gaps and concerns from practitioners and toll facility  administrators, professionals, and academics.  The section below briefly paraphrases the concerns that  were  voiced  in  the  interview  process,  and  organizes  them  by  theme.    Five  major  themes  were  consistently identified during this stage and are described below.    Theme #1 – More Federal Guidance   Theme #2 – Continuing Challenges with Inclusive Public Outreach   Theme #3 – Need for Modeling and Analysis Tools that Can Address EJ and Equity   Theme #4 – Convey How Pricing Can Support More Equitable Transportation Systems  Theme #5 – Maintain Database of Examples for Analysis and Mitigation   3.3.1 Theme #1: More Federal Guidance  Need for Development of a Standard.  There is a need for a standardized process to determine the economic impact, also known as financial burden impacts, of tolling projects on low‐income  populations.     Additional Guidance  from FHWA.   While not a newly expressed concern, several  interviewees would find it helpful if EJ thresholds were set from a Federal level in terms of the identification of low‐income and minority populations.  Consistent  Application  of  Federal  Guidance  Criteria.    Interviewees  expressed  concern  that Federal oversight was inconsistently applied on the scope or level of effort needed as well as the rationale applied to EJ determinations.  “How to” Guidance Needed for Conducting EJ Analysis.  Prior FHWA and resource guidance on equity  in a tolling context was focused on what has been done, or could be done, but was not particularly instructive on how it should be done.  Very little information was presented within an  EJ  framework.    It  was  difficult  to  find  examples  of  the  "how‐to"  in  analyzing  and characterizing  the magnitude  or  severity  of  impacts  on  EJ  populations  vis‐à‐vis  the  general population.    Additionally,  examples  were  lacking  on  how  to  comprehensively  evaluate  and account for offsetting benefits and mitigation measures in making a finding determination.  Analysis Seems Subjective.  There are no specific thresholds or required methods of analysis.  At the same time every project is very different and exists in a unique context.  Localities want the freedom  to address  the  specific  circumstances, but at  the  same  time need  some  comparison points and thresholds to confirm that they are on right track with federal oversight.  Preference for an Established Methodology for Determining Impacts.  When FTA issued its Title VI  Circular  in  2012,  they  supplied  methodologies  for  determining  what  impacts  were disproportionate, but  let  localities set  their own  thresholds.   This gave  responsible agencies a way to determine disproportionate  impact without being arbitrary.   With toll projects there  is no established way to analyze impacts and who will be impacted.  Should the agency be looking

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 88  at income, car ownership or something else?  Once it is determined what to look at, how does  an agency make a determination of what  is disproportionate?   FHWA could supply something  equivalent to the FTA Title VI Circular.    3.3.2 Theme #2: Continuing Challenges with Inclusive Public Outreach  "Hierarchy  of  Needs"  Problem.    Citizens  dealing  with  poverty  need  to  have  more options/methods of participation, as they have many things competing for their time and may  not have the luxury of being able to participate in traditional meetings.        Involvement of  Immigrant and Refugee Populations.    These  groups may be  intimidated  and discouraged due to unfamiliarity with public meetings and the public engagement process.  Greater Use of Focus Groups, Panels, and Citizen  Juries.   There  is not enough  input from the people that will be using the end product, and public involvement tools such as these allow for meaningful public input.  Improved Methods  for Measuring Public  Involvement and  Public  Input.    It  is difficult  to  tell from  the  strategies  employed  and  the  documentation  whether  or  not  we  are  seeing involvement from under‐represented groups.  Social  Services  and  Planner  Collaboration.    More  collaboration  should  occur  between transportation planning and workforce development organizations. 3.3.3 Theme 3: Need for Modeling and Analytical Tools that Can Address EJ and Equity  Need for a Standardized Analysis Tool for User Cost Impacts.  One interviewee noted the need for a  tool  to determine  the economic  (or user cost)  impacts of  tolling projects on  low‐income  communities.  Another agency interviewee, however, disagreed with the utility of that analytical  frame, observing  that  their agency had  found  it difficult  to  convey all of  the project benefits  when looking at impacts through this lens.     Better Tool  for Determining Price‐based Behavior.   Agencies tend  to rely upon existing travel demand models to predict socioeconomic behavior before and after toll pricing implementation. Interviewees asserted that agencies should require more  input from people via survey or data from existing tolled roads to apply to the model.  Tool to Model Distribution of Benefits.   There are currently very few good tools for looking at the distribution of benefits or costs by income segments.  Most of the travel demand models are not designed to address this aspect and thus will not convey who will use the facility by income. In an attempt to address this shortcoming, the agency looked at case studies of projects like SR‐ 91 (LA) and I‐394 and I‐35W (Minnesota) to see if low‐income drivers used the express lane.  Who  Benefits/Who  Pays  in  terms  of  the  Alternatives.    EJ  analysis  typically  analyzes  who benefits and who pays based at the planning level, but not necessarily at the level of the project specific alternatives.   In other words, which alternative performed best in terms of equity?  An advocacy‐based organization  interviewee suggested that analysis such as this might show that using  toll  income  to  pay  for  improved  transit  is more  equitable  than  using  it  for  improved capacity for instance.  Need  for  Regional  Tolling  Analysis.    Tolling  Projects  do  not  exist  in  a  vacuum  and  it  is appropriate to place the project in regional context; regional network analyses are preferable to project specific studies for describing analyses and the rationale for preferred alternatives.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 89  3.3.4 Theme #4: Convey How Pricing Can Support More Equitable Transportation Systems  Faith  in Differential Pricing.   Differential pricing based on distance of travel,  time of day, and ability to pay is a simple and straightforward way of applying tolls more fairly.    Greater Emphasis on the Transportation System as a Whole.  Equity is not just looking at how a single  roadway  affects  a  low‐income  community.   Mitigation  could  be more  comprehensive. Agencies  in  some  states,  such as MnDOT, use  revenue  sharing with  transit, enhanced  transit service, free service for carpoolers, and no tolls in off‐peak hours.  Tolling is a second best solution to a VMT Based Tax.   Tolling should eventually be traded out for something like a VMT tax. 3.3.5 Theme #5: Database of Existing Analysis and Mitigation Strategies  Examples of EJ Analysis Methods related to Tolling Projects.  Agency interviewee observed that they had  to develop a  lot of  their analytical methods  from scratch.   They  found  the outreach  work done in LA and Atlanta particularly interesting.     Toolbox  of  Mitigation  Strategies.    Agencies  and  practitioners  could  use  a  well‐developed database  of  tools  and  techniques  and mitigation  strategies  that  practitioners  could  utilize  in examining impacts and developing solutions based on their unique context.  Difficult  to Find Good Examples of Analysis and Mitigation Techniques.   A database or some sort of tool that would give examples of similar situations and ways in which the mitigation was addressed and implemented would be very useful.  Need  Survey Research  Studies of Minority and  Low‐Income Users and  their Travel Behavior and  Attitudes  toward  Toll  Roads  in Operation.   One  agency  interviewee  found  survey  data reporting toll road usage that compared  low‐income traveler usage to other populations to be among  the most  useful  in  developing  their  impact  analyses.    They would  like  to  see more information summarized concisely in an accessible manner.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 90  3.4 Summary of Travel Behavior and Attitudes Survey Analysis The Research Team  reviewed  the content of  travel‐related surveys conducted  to assess attitudes and  measure travel behavior effects of tolling facilities and managed lanes (see Appendix D).  In particular,  the content review examined whether surveys were designed and analyzed  to consider how attitudes  and behavior may differ by user groups and how  findings were  reported  in publicly available  reports,  particularly  the  needs,  concerns  and  impacts  to  low‐income  and minority  populations.    The  content  review performed here is intended to expand on earlier publications that have collected evidence from  multiple surveys about how tolling impacts equity considerations (e.g., income, modal, geographic).      Overview of the Surveys Examined.  A total of 24 relevant surveys were publicly available, collected and  included  in this content review analysis (see Table 7) which covers the time period between the years  2003 and 2015.  The tool write‐up, “Designing and Implementing Surveys to Assess Attitudes and Travel  Behavior for EJ Analyses and to Monitor Implementation” provides an overview of the projects for which  surveys were  collected  and  examines  the  types  of  survey  questions,  samples  sizes,  and  distribution  methods  used  for  these  surveys.    The  content  review  analysis  was  performed  for  the  following  attributes:  1. Survey sponsor: Entity that commissioned the survey. 2. Participating organizations: Firms that implemented the survey and/or published project reports documenting the survey. 3. Project name and location: Name of the facility or corridor under study, and the region. 4. Type of tolling project: Managed lane, tolled bridge, etc. 5. Who was surveyed: The type of person selected for surveying (i.e., anyone who made a peak‐ hour weekday trip within the recent past on a specific facility). 6. Data collection period: The months/years in which respondents completed a survey. 7. Survey mode: Phone, online, etc. 8. Survey objective: A description of what the project sponsors wanted to learn from the survey results, as explained in a project report. 9. Number of responses analyzed: The number of responses analyzed in documentation about the survey.  In some cases, this is fewer than the number of people who answered survey questions, such as when incomplete responses were eliminated from the analysis. 10. Decision‐making stage: When survey was completed. 11. Were survey materials available in languages OTHER than English: List of any alternative languages in which the survey materials were available. 12. Survey question language: Information about the questions asked that are most directly relevant to equity analysis by income or race/ethnicity.  Where possible, the exact language used in the survey instrument is reproduced.  If the instrument was not provided, then a description of the questions is given.  In surveys with complex survey skip patterns, such as the stated preference questions, a representative sample of the questions asked, rather than reproducing the entire relevant set of questions is provided. 13. Survey findings reported by race and/or ethnicity: This section reproduces content in the project reports that describes the survey findings for different race/ethnicity groups.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 91  14. Survey findings reported by income: This section reproduces content in the project reports that describes the survey findings for different income groups. Table 7.  Surveys Reviewed: Tolling Facility Location and Types of Surveys  Survey Location   Type of Survey   Year  I‐110, I‐10/I‐210 Corridor and San Gabriel Valley,  Los Angeles County, CA (3 surveys)  Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews  2008  Los Angeles County METRO, I‐110 and I‐10  Corridor  License Plate & Mailback   2009  I‐10, I‐110, Los Angeles County, California  License Plate & Mailback   2012  Equity Plan ExpressLanes, Los Angeles County, CA  Online   2013  I‐10 and I‐110 Corridors, Los Angeles County, CA  License Plate & Mailback  2014  I‐10 and I‐110 Corridors, Los Angeles County, CA  In‐Person Intercept  2015  US 36, Denver, CO Region  Stated Preference Survey  2010  I‐25, Denver, CO Region  Stated Preference Survey   2003  I‐75 South ‐ Atlanta, GA Region  Stated Preference Survey  2005  I‐20, I‐75, I‐95, and I‐285‐ Atlanta, GA Region  Stated Preference Survey  2007  I‐75 South ‐ Atlanta, GA Region  Stated Preference Survey  2012  I‐85 Express Lanes ‐ Atlanta, GA Region  Before / After Implementation Survey (2 Waves)  2011‐ 2012  Chicago‐Region Travel, Tollways and Expressways  in Chicago Metro Area Chicago, IL Region  Stated Preference Survey  2008  Louisville – Southern Indian Ohio River Bridges,  Kentucky/ Indiana  In‐Person Intercept  2013  I‐394, Minneapolis‐St. Paul, MN   Attitudinal Panel Survey (3 Waves)   2004‐ 2006  Columbia River Crossing, Portland, OR, and  Vancouver, WA  Stated Preference Survey  2009  Katy Freeway and US 290, Houston, TX  Stated Preference Survey   2003   Katy Freeway and US 290, Houston, TX Region  Stated Preference Survey   2003  Houston and Dallas, TX Regions  Stated Preference Survey   2006  Katy Freeway, Houston, TX  Stated Preference Survey   2008  I‐30 Express Lanes, North Central Texas, TX  Stated Preference Survey: Loyalty Reward  incentives  2014  SR‐520 Bridge – Seattle, WA Region  Before / After Implementation Survey (2 Waves)  2010‐ 2012  

 NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 92  Brief Summary.   The content review of travel surveys documents how toll plans and pricing  initiatives  have been viewed by its potential users.  The surveys seek to capture the attitudes of respondents about  the  fairness  of  toll  projects  and/or  solicit  the  respondents’  view  of  the  presumed  or  actual  travel  behavior effects of the toll plan or pricing options.      Table  1  (see Appendix D)  presents  a  summary  of  key  findings  from  the  individual  toll‐related  travel  surveys and explores the topics of transponder usage, opinions or attitudes toward tolling, and actual or  predicted use of toll facilities.  The compiled toll‐related travel surveys are intended to be a resource for  comparing  the  reported  similarities  and  differences  by  income  and  race  factors  on  several  topics.   Toward the objective of advancing the use of surveys for pre‐and/or post‐implementation monitoring of  travel  behavior  in  support  of  comprehensive  and  thorough  EJ  assessments,  the  table  reveals  disappointing gaps  in  the  current practice  in  the  consistent  reporting of  race and  income patterns  in  comparison to the general populations or non‐EJ populations.      To  support  the  practice  of  environmental  justice  assessments,  toll  survey  sampling  plans must  be  sufficiently  robust  to  capture  the  views of  low‐income  and minority  segments,  the  analysis plan  and  report  findings must be designed  to  comprehensively  assess how  the benefits  and burdens of  these  initiatives may be perceived and borne by  low‐income and minority populations  in comparison  to  the  broader general population (i.e., the non‐EJ populations).      Limitations  and  Opportunities  to  Improve  EJ  Assessment  through  Surveys.    Reflecting  on  the  development of  the  travel  survey  content  review,  the  limitations  section of  the Tool write‐up makes  several observations that reflect challenges and opportunities to improve the use of surveys to advance  EJ assessments through implementation of pre‐ and post‐implementation surveys.    Several  of  the  reviewed  surveys were  prepared  to  estimate  values  of  the  toll  sensitivity  or  VOT  of  travelers  to  identify  current  travel  preferences  and  behaviors  and  explore  the  users’  potential  willingness to pay to use tolling facilities such as managed  lanes under various pricing and travel time  options.  Many of these surveys were either not specifically designed, or were not analyzed, to support  detailed equity and EJ analyses.  A few patterns were observed in the preparation of this content review:    Many travel demand related surveys were not designed to ask about race/ethnicity.      Many survey instruments were available only in English.      Many  sampling  plans  for  surveys were  done with  user  group  populations  that  included  very  small  numbers  of  low‐income  or  minority  respondents,  resulting  in  too  few  people  in  the  protected populations of concern to compare responses, with confidence, to responses of the  rest of the population.      In  some  cases,  surveys  combined  low‐income  and minority  populations  into  one  group  and  middle‐to‐high‐income  and  non‐minorities  into  one  group,  making  it  difficult  to  determine  whether  the  differences  in  responses  are  related  to  differences  in  income  or  race/ethnic  demographics.   Few of the reviewed surveys specifically targeted low‐income and minority groups as categories  for  the  sample population.    Sampling plan design  could be more proactive  in addressing  this  need with pre‐planning and appropriate budgeting.  With greater attention to overweighting or  requiring a minimum  sample  size,  low‐income and minority  travelers’ perspectives and  travel  behaviors  could  be  rigorously  considered  for  time  segments  (e.g.,  peak‐hour,  off‐peak).   Although  this  level  of  effort  is  not  common  practice  for  travel  user  survey  implementation,  oversight agencies could require evidence of this effort  in their regional planning certification, 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 93  during environmental  review approval phases  for specific project  regions or corridors, or as a  condition for making grant commitments.      Making  a  commitment  to  preparing  sampling  plans  that  seek  greater  representation  of  low‐ income and minority populations could be advanced  in several ways.   For example, the  license plate mail  in and back method  should directly  target  surveys  to addresses within  low‐income and minority census blocks.   Greater attention to surnames  in random digit dialing phone  lists would increase Hispanic household participation.  The online survey method could send links to companies within  industries whose workers  typically  are working  class or  low‐income  and  to businesses and companies with many minority employees.   Both  the  license plate mail  in and back and online  survey method  should allow adequate  time  for participants  to  complete  the survey to ensure sample size.  The in‐person intercept survey method should place interviewers in  strategic  locations  in  low‐income  and  minority  communities,  for  example,  at  shopping locations that accept Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards. Even surveys that have the raw data needed for EJ analyses (i.e., asked the right questions in the survey  instrument)  receive  very  little  specific  analysis  relating  to  income  or  race/ethnicity.    The  review  of  surveys found the following:   Survey reports typically do not systematically present findings for every question by  income or race/ethnicity.   Even  the reports with  the most comprehensive coverage only discuss some of the  questions  asked  by  income  and/or  race.    In  some  cases,  response  patterns  for  the  EJ populations were presented  in separate reports or chapters and did not facilitate the types of comparison of benefits and burdens that would be anticipated in an EJ analysis.  Race/ethnicity  is  less well  covered  than  income.    Far more  reports provide  some  findings by income  group  than  by  race/ethnicity.    And  even  the  ones  that  do  report  some  findings  by race/ethnicity usually report far less than they do by income.  Many reports present no analysis at all by race/ethnicity or income except for looking at income to determine VOT/willingness to pay. Improved documentation and reporting expectations for the topic of EJ could advance the state‐of‐the‐ practice and support greater knowledge sharing and  transparency.   Many reports refer  to appendices  with details such as the survey questionnaire, but do not include these materials when the reports are  posted.    Some  reports  reference  other  documents  that  contain  more  detailed  survey  reports  or  analyses, but these reference documents are unavailable.    Funding  and  sponsoring  agencies  need  to  expect  complete  reports  to  include  supporting  technical  appendices related to survey methods and questionnaire design, among other materials.  In the context  of  EJ,  the  affected  public  and  interested  stakeholders  need  to  be  afforded  access  to  the  completed  datasets for research and monitoring.  Sharing these materials through a central repository of surveys or  high‐quality  surveys  at  a  clearinghouse  website  (e.g.,  the  American  Association  of  State  Highway  Transportation Official [AASHTO] or FHWA Congestion Pricing website) could also improve the state‐of‐ the‐practice.    

Next: 4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox »
Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 237: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report presents information gathered in the development of NCHRP Research Report 860: Assessing the Environmental Justice Effects of Toll Implementation or Rate Changes: Guidebook and Toolbox. This web-only document summarizes the technical research and presents the technical memorandum that documents the literature, existing case studies, resource documents, and other reports compiled.

NCHRP Research Report 860 provides a set of tools to enable analysis and measurement of the impacts of toll pricing, toll payment, toll collection technology, and other aspects of toll implementation and rate changes on low-income and minority populations.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!