National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 1.0 Objectives of the Research
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"2.0 Research Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 3
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"2.0 Research Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 4
Page 5
Suggested Citation:"2.0 Research Methodology." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 5

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 3  2.0 Research Methodology The major tasks of the Research Methodology are described briefly in the following section.   Task 1.  Review the State‐of‐the‐Practice.  A comprehensive State‐of‐the‐Practice Literature Review was  conducted  in  Task  1.    This was  a multi‐pronged  literature  review,  examining  the  existing  academic  literature,  policy  reports,  project  specific  documents,  resource  guides,  case  studies,  and  effective  practices on  issues relevant  to consideration of equity and EJ on toll  implementation and rate change  studies.  The customary academic literature review is summarized in Section 3.1 of the Research Results  section  of  this  report,  and  detailed  literature  review  summaries  are  provided  as  Appendix  A.    The  academic  literature  review,  although  thorough,  indicated  significant  gaps  in  the  types of  information  required for the Guidebook and Toolbox, to provide technical assistance support to the target audience  of transportation agencies and consulting practitioners.    To  supplement  the  state‐of‐the‐practice  research  and  address  this  gap,  the  Research  Team  also  undertook a content review of primary source documents from tolling projects across the country.  For  this content review analysis of planning and project level technical reports, the Research Team collected  and examined planning and environmental technical studies for their treatment of environmental justice  considerations.    The  content  review  analysis  included  relevant  chapters  of  transportation  plans,  environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, and other reports.   The content review  analysis was systematically undertaken to identify customary approaches as well as leading, innovative,  or effective practices that could warrant additional follow‐up research for the Toolbox.    In the state‐of‐the‐practice review of planning and project level technical reports, it was found that  many of the environmental justice analyses were lacking in one or more ways or provided only a  minimal review of environmental justice impacts.  Overall there appeared to be room for more thorough  and comprehensive analysis as well as greater discussion of the proactive or inclusive approaches being  employed to consider environmental justice impacts.  For example, several reviewed studies provided  little documentation of how public involvement processes were used to inform the identification of  affected populations, their needs or concerns, or prospective impacts.    While there was significant variation in the types of studies reviewed, several technical reports lacked  sufficient analysis of travel behavior related impacts by income segment.  Generally, the analyses did  not show a direct linkage or relationship between the travel behavior of low‐income and minority  populations in the study area and the usage of toll and non‐tolled facilities, but instead relied on proxy  arguments (e.g., toll trips came from an area of higher low‐income and minority populations).  Only a  few studies appeared to rely upon travel‐related surveys or focus groups to derive findings.  In several  cases, technical environmental studies made reference to select research studies and surveys of partial  pricing (i.e., high‐occupancy tolling [HOT] lanes) projects to support a finding of no disproportionately  high and adverse effects based on the factual argument that all populations may at one time or another  make use of the priced lanes; little consideration was given to the performance or time burden effects  that may differ for use of the untolled alternative.  Additionally, many reports gave little attention to the  relative cost burden borne by the traveler based upon the proportion of their household income spent  in travel.     The  content  review  of  planning  and  environmental  documents  is  summarized  in  Section  3.2  of  the  Research Results  section  of  this  report,  and  the  detailed  content  review  summaries  are  provided  as  Appendix B.   

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 4  Task 2.   Plan of Outreach to Agencies and Practitioners.   The Research Team developed an Outreach  Plan for interviews to further assess the current state‐of‐the‐practice in the treatment of environmental  justice  considerations  on  toll  implementation  and  rate  change  projects  and  identify  gaps  in  existing  guidance  that  should  be  addressed  as  part  of  the  Guidebook  and  Toolbox.    The  plan  of  outreach  described the rationale and approach for contacting practitioners from sponsoring and regulating public  agencies, the private sector, and select transportation, environment, equity, and community advocacy  organizations.    The purpose was to  identify existing methods and actual practices  in evaluating environmental  justice  impacts  from  toll  projects  and  to  validate  from  practitioners  needed  topics  for  the  Guidebook  and  Toolbox.    In  part,  the  objective  of  this  research was  to  identify  potential  effective  practices  or  case  examples that could be described or distilled for the Guidebook and Toolbox.    Tasks 3.  Technical Memorandum.  The Research Team prepared an initial Technical Memorandum that  documented the  literature, existing case studies, resource documents, and other reports compiled and  reviewed during Task 1, and  the Outreach Plan developed during Task 2  to contact practitioners and  other  agencies  and  organizations  to  further  assist  in  the  identification  of  the  current  state‐of‐the‐ practice and  technical assistance needs  from  the practitioner  community as  it pertains  to  tolling and  environmental justice.    The  Technical Memorandum  reaffirmed  that  the Guidebook  and  its  accompanying  Toolbox  elements  were  expected  to  follow  a  step‐by‐step process  framework,  as  initially proposed,  to  ensure  that  the  Research Team is focused on what is most important to agencies and practitioners seeking to consider  environmental  justice  as  part  of  toll  implementation  and  rate  change  analyses.    Drawing  upon  the  research to date, the Technical Memorandum revisited the prospective steps of the process framework  to further scope and identify topics for content development as well as to needed guidance and tools to  address environmental justice issues of tolling actions.  Questions and considerations were raised under  each  step of  the  framework  to  inform  the Research Team’s  consideration of  the needed  content  for  each step of the framework for the next phase of research and to solicit input from the project panel.  Task 4.    Structured  Interviews and  Initial Case  Studies.    The Research Team  contacted practitioners  from  sponsoring  and  regulating  public  agencies,  the  private  sector,  and  select  transportation,  environment,  equity,  and  community  advocacy  organizations  to  fill  identified  gaps.    The  targeted  interview population included agency staff, practitioners and other affected stakeholders regarding the  current state‐of‐the‐practice.  The Outreach Plan, contact lists, and interview guides developed in prior  tasks were used  to  collect  information on  innovative and exemplary practices  throughout  the United  States.    The Research Team also developed working templates for tools and case examples to ensure consistent  reporting of information and an accessible format for the development of the Toolbox‐related materials.   The  information  gathered  was  used  to  begin  to  develop  tools  and  case  examples  to  address  the  identified gaps in existing practices in many states.  The interviews and outreach were supplemented by  additional research and expert consultation as necessary to develop accurate and contextually sensitive  tools, continuing throughout Step 6.    Task 5.  Preparation of Interim Report, Outline for the Toolbox, and Panel Review.  This task entailed  the  preparation  of  an  Interim  Report  documenting  the  Research  Team’s work  conducted  in  Tasks  1  through 4.  The Interim Report included a detailed, proposed outline for the Guidebook to be prepared  in  Task  6.    It  also  included  example  tools  and  case  examples,  and  sample  chapters  and  proposed  wayfinding mechanisms as a foretaste of the full Guidebook and Toolbox.  A presentation was prepared

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes  Page 5   highlighting core findings and recommendations.   The study panel provided significant comments that  informed the development of the Guidebook and Toolbox as it moved forward.    Task 6.   Develop the Toolbox.   This task entailed the full development of the Guidebook and all of  its  Toolbox elements.   The Guidebook was designed to lead the practitioner to the Toolbox elements that  best fit their needs.   Many tools required additional research.   The draft Guidebook and Toolbox were  presented  to  the study panel, and additional revisions and streamlining were requested by  the panel.   One  of  the  research  efforts  resulted  in  the  Tool  “Designing  and  Implementing  Surveys  to  Assess  Attitudes and Travel Behavior for EJ Analyses and to Monitor Implementation.” The content reviews and  tables summarizing  the 24 surveys that were systematically analyzed  for the development of this tool  are presented in Appendix C.    Task 7.  Prepare Outreach and Presentation Materials.  This task developed the outreach materials for  transportation agencies to create awareness of the Guidebook and a contact  list for notification of the  availability of the report elements upon official release.  The presentation materials include a fact sheet  for widespread reproduction and distribution at conferences, technical meetings, and other venues.    Task 8.  Preparation of Final Research Report, Stand‐alone Guidebook, and Toolbox.  This task consists  of this final report that documents the entire research effort and includes the Guidebook and Toolbox,  under separate cover.       

Next: 3.0 Research Results »
Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 237: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report presents information gathered in the development of NCHRP Research Report 860: Assessing the Environmental Justice Effects of Toll Implementation or Rate Changes: Guidebook and Toolbox. This web-only document summarizes the technical research and presents the technical memorandum that documents the literature, existing case studies, resource documents, and other reports compiled.

NCHRP Research Report 860 provides a set of tools to enable analysis and measurement of the impacts of toll pricing, toll payment, toll collection technology, and other aspects of toll implementation and rate changes on low-income and minority populations.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!