National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning (2014)

Chapter: Appendix F - User s Guide

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - User s Guide." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22333.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

73 User’s Guide Contents 74 Quick Start Tips for Tool Use 76 Introduction 76 Purpose of the TIRP Tool 77 Purpose of This User’s Guide 77 Minimum System Requirement 77 What the TIRP Tool Can Do 77 Inputs 77 Processing Within the Tool 78 Outputs 78 What the TIRP Tool Cannot Do 78 Directions for Using the Tool 85 Frequently Asked Questions 88 Lessons Learned 89 User’s Guide Bibliography A P P E N D I X F

74 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning In order to operate this tool, all macros and content from Microsoft Excel must be enabled. On the initial opening of the tool, you should be prompted to “Enable Content” or “Enable Mac- ros,” depending on your version of Excel. You can also manually enable macros by performing the following steps. Enable Macro Setting: 1. In Excel go to “File,” then “Options.” 2. Click “Trust Center” on the left-hand side. 3. Click “Trust Center Settings” on the right-hand side. 4. Click “Macro Settings” on the left-hand side. 5. Select the “Enable All Macros” choice, then select “OK.” If you do not enable macros, the tool will not remember data entered in previous pages and will not create a plan after you have entered all data. Quick Start Tips for Tool Use • Insert the CD-ROM into your computer and save the tool and user guide to your desktop. • It is highly recommended that you save each version of the tool with a unique name for version control! • Enable content/macros—The tool cannot function without it!

User’s Guide 75 Choose the type of airport Your results of hazard risk analysis No Risk of Incidents Very likely Likely Somewhat Likely Unlikely Never 1 Hurricane 2 Snow storm 3 Tornado 4 Earthquake 5 Structural Fire 6 Electrical Outage/Power Failure 7 Bomb Threat 8 Security Breach 9 Active Shooter The Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning tool is an interactive decision support tool that will guide the user in the development of a plan for appropriate response to an incident or hazard affecting terminal operations. Help Help • Use the Tool Tips by placing your cursor over the small red triangle symbol! Tool Tips • Use the “Help” button when you have a question!

76 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning • Users can add/delete the gray-and-white shaded data-entry rows (lines) in the tables as necessary—but be sure to stay within the boundaries of the table when doing so! • Ensure that you close any open programs for best performance of the tool. • Clipboard errors (Error Code 4605) may result from having a computer with limited RAM; if you get this error during the TIRP generation, clear your clipboard memory manually or restart your computer. (It will auto clear the clipboard at restart.) • How do I clear my clipboard manually? Go to your Windows start button, type in “cmd,” at the command prompt type: “echo off | clip,” and then hit the “Enter” key; your clipboard will be clear. • Note: In case you are wondering, the symbol “ | ” is known as the “vertical bar” symbol; you enter it by pressing the “Shift” key and the “backslash” key (above the “Enter” key). • Here is an example at the command prompt (username: amoore). Please read the User’s Guide and enjoy! Introduction Purpose of the TIRP Tool The Terminal Incident Response Plan (TIRP) tool was designed to support airport personnel in creating effective TIRPs for evacuation, sheltering-in-place (SIP) procedures, and repopula- tion for a variety of incidents that disrupt normal operations in airport passenger terminals. Users input information unique to their airport and the nature of the incident, and the tool will automatically generate a plan that adheres to specific airport terminal configurations, policies, and standard operating procedures (SOPs). A TIRP includes separate actionable response plans for nine of the most disruptive types of incidents. These incidents are snowstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, structural fires, electrical outages, bomb threats, security breaches, and active shooter incidents. For other types

User’s Guide 77 of incidents, users can adapt plans from the most closely related of the nine basic incidents (e.g., plans for an Internet outage can be adapted from plans for an electrical outage). As a Microsoft Word document, the TIRP can be further edited and customized to suit the specific needs of the airport. Designed to save users both time and trouble during disruptive events, the TIRP tool is easy to use and provides realistic, actionable response plans. The tool does not generate a plan that duplicates an airport’s other essential plans such as the airport emergency plan (AEP) or the airport security program (ASP). Rather, the tool specifies where within existing plans a TIRP can provide additional guidance for managing passenger terminals during nonroutine incidents ranging from a single medical evacuation to a full-scale natural disaster. TIRPs generated using the tool can be used as AEP sections, as additions to incident-specific annexes in AEPs, or as stand-alone plans referenced in AEPs. They can also be incorporated into airport customer service manuals. Purpose of This User’s Guide This guide directs airport operators, terminal managers, emergency managers, and planners step-by-step through the process of generating TIRPs using the TIRP tool. It explains how to run the tool, input data, obtain outputs, and customize outputs. Minimum System Requirement The TIRP tool can run on a laptop or desktop computer using Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word, including macros, from Microsoft Office version 2007 or later. At this time, it cannot be run on tablets, smartphones, or other handheld devices since Microsoft Office versions do not provide macro capabilities. When the user downloads the TIRP tool’s Excel file from the Transportation Research Board website, the user must enable macros. Since the tool is a macro-enabled spreadsheet, the user’s Excel software will prompt the user to select “Enable this content” and “OK” to enable macros. What the TIRP Tool Can Do The TIRP tool is an Excel spreadsheet with macros that receives inputs from the user, links them to appropriate plan text elements, calls for further detailed input as required, and produces a draft TIRP in a Word document that can easily be customized and shared with personnel responding to the incident. Inputs Users enter specific data regarding airport characteristics, contacts, and existing plans (e.g., AEPs or airport security plans) by filling in an initial incident checklist along with a series of simple Excel data input forms. The forms use yes-or-no and fill-in-the-blank questions to select or deselect pertinent sections. Input forms allow the airport to insert maps, photos, or other graphics to display features such as evacuation areas, pathways, or the location of emergency equipment. These custom input methods create a TIRP tailored to the specific physical configu- ration and risk profile of the airport. Processing Within the Tool The heart of the TIRP tool is an Excel spreadsheet that uses macros to select critical pathways, select pertinent text elements, and logically organize the elements of the plan into chapters.

78 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Outputs The tool’s final macro converts the Excel output into a TIRP as a Word document that can be edited and further customized by the user. This document consists of separate chapters for SIP, evacuation, repopulation, and highest-impact incident types included via the initial inci- dent checklist. Each chapter of the plan produced by the tool includes a checklist for all actions required by the plan. Additional chapters may be added to the plan by copying and editing the most related chapter and locally customizing it for other incident types (e.g., baggage system failure or air traffic control delays). Further guidance for selecting similar chapters is provided in the taxonomy of incident types in Table 6 of the main body of the report. At the user’s discretion, the tool can also develop an appendix listing all related contact and coordination information. While this appendix may be useful when responding to incidents, it is not meant to replace contact lists required in the AEP, ASP, or other primary documents. What the TIRP Tool Cannot Do • The TIRP tool does not include a logical process for making the initial decision to activate an evacuation or SIP plan. That decision is best made by a designated airport authority with direct understanding of the unique nature of both the airport and the incident. Users activate the TIRP when the decision to evacuate or shelter in place has been made or is obvious to airport or tenant employees in the terminal. The latter case often occurs during incidents with no warning. • The tool is not designed for direct incorporation into an airport’s command, control, and communications system or for incorporation into a web-based coordination system. It is designed as a stand-alone program for generating TIRPs. • The tool does not generate automatic updates. However, users can easily and quickly update TIRPs due to user-friendly input forms and robust internal processing capability. • The tool does not generate training plans or drill and exercise scenarios. However, the TIRPs are highly suitable for use as training materials. • Other important airport plans are referenced in the plan produced by the TIRP, but the TIRP does not automatically generate hyperlinks to those external plans and documents. Once an airport has its plan as a Word document, it can edit it to incorporate whatever links it desires to include. An example might be a link to the master contact list, AEP, customer service manual, or other relevant guidance. Directions for Using the Tool The following section provides detailed instruction with visual aids to help you develop and generate a personalized TIRP for your airport. Refer to the visuals and text for step-by-step instructions. 1. Download the tool from the Internet or from the CD-ROM into a folder location on your computer or to your desktop. 2. Double click on the Excel file “TIRP Tool” to launch the tool. 3. You will be taken to the title sheet, and at this point you must enable macros for the program to function properly. Begin by clicking the “Enable Content” option button as displayed in Figure 2 for Microsoft Excel 2010 users. For Microsoft Excel 2007 users, follow Step 4 to complete the enabling of macros/content. 4. Users in Microsoft Excel 2007 will need to follow this additional step (Figure 3). Enable macros for Excel in the pop-up window by clicking “Enable this content” and then “OK.” The floating title page will pop up next (also known as the Control Form).

User’s Guide 79 Figure 1. TIRP tool. Figure 2. Initial macros screen. 5. It is recommended that you click on the “Read Me Before Using” button prior to using the tool. It has several helpful hints to get you started (Figure 4). 6. You can also click on the “System Requirements” button to display minimum computer system requirements for the tool to run properly (Figure 4). 7. When you are ready to develop your terminal plan, click on the button that says “Begin Using Tool” (Figure 4). You will then be taken to the Airport Details worksheet.

80 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Figure 3. Enabling macros. Figure 4. Title page buttons.

User’s Guide 81 8. Click the X in the upper right-hand corner of the floating title page to minimize it (Figure 5). You can then move the minimized title page to a location that is out of your way. You can also click either the X again or the “Restore Control” button at any time to open the title page back up. 9. On the Airport Details worksheet fill in the gray blanks throughout the page with specific data and answer the yes-or-no question. Note: Figure 6 only shows a small portion of the airport details screen. 10. Once complete, move your mouse to the bottom of the airport details worksheet and click on the “Continue to Plan Profile” button (Figure 7). You will then be taken to the Plan Profile worksheet. 11. In the Plan Profile worksheet, choose your airport type, as shown in Figure 8. 12. Scroll down and select the likelihood of the nine risk incident scenarios occurring at your airport (Figure 9). Any incident for which you click very likely, likely, or somewhat likely will appear as a separate worksheet in the TIRP and as a separate chapter in the TIRP output document. If you wish to include an incident with a lower risk at your airport, you must select at least somewhat likely to generate the chapter in the final document. 13. Below the Risk of Incidents section is a list of documents relevant to the TIRP (Figure 10). Populate the blanks in the table with all relevant documents. Note: You can enter as many lines as you need. Any lines or cells left blank will not appear in the final plan. These docu- ments will be carried over to each subsequent form and will be displayed in a light-green non-editable table. You will be able to edit the section number and page number pertaining to the most appropriate section of each document as it applies to each unique hazard worksheet. Minimized Figure 5. Minimizing the title page.

82 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Airport Details Name Responsible Dept. for this plan Revision No. Original Date Revision Date Airport Sponsor/Owner International Arrivals/Dep (involves CBP) Person approving this plan Title of the person approving this plan Yes No Figure 6. Airport details page. Click Figure 7. Continue to plan profile button. Plan Profile Back Choose the type of airport The Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning tool is an interactive decision support tool that will guide the user in the development of a plan for appropriate response to an incident or hazard affecting terminal operations. Small Medium Large Non-hub Primary Figure 8. Choose airport type. Your results of hazard risk analysis No Risk of Incidents Very likely Likely Somewhat Likely Unlikely Never 1 Hurricane 2 Snow storm 3 Tornado 4 Earthquake 5 Structural Fire 6 Electrical Outage/Power Failure 7 Bomb Threat 8 Security Breach 9 Active Shooter Help Will appear as a separate chapter in the TIRP Figure 9. Airport terminal hazard risk analysis.

User’s Guide 83 14. Once complete, click on “Continue to Shelter-In-Place.” 15. Fill in the blanks in each table of the Shelter-In-Place worksheet (Figure 11). Note: The light-green tables are auto-populated based on the list of relevant documents you created in the Plan Profile worksheet. The section numbers and page numbers of the auto-populated documents can be listed as indicated in Figure 11 to expedite identification of pertinent information. All documents that need to be referenced in the Terminal Incident Response Plan No Revision No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 DateDocument Name Continue to Shelter-In-Place Help Step One Step Two Figure 10. Document list detail. Fill In Select the documents that need to be referenced in the Terminal Incident Response Plan No Revision No Date Section No Page No Include 1 Select 2 Select 3 Select 4 Select 5 Select 6 Select 7 Select 8 Select 9 Select 10 Select Emergency Shelter Locations (inside the terminal) Location Terminal Concourse/Gate Level Description Document Name Help Help Auto Populated Figure 11. SIP page.

84 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning 16. Once complete, scroll down to the bottom of the worksheet and click on “Continue to Evacuation.” 17. Fill in the blanks in each table. Be sure to answer the two yes-or-no questions on the form. 18. Click on “Continue to Repopulation.” 19. Fill in the blanks in each table. 20. Click on “Continue to Incident Responses.” Depending on the risks you identified in the Plan Profile worksheet, you will be taken to a new worksheet for each respective incident. 21. Continue filling in each incident response type worksheet, being sure to populate the blanks (e.g., hurricane, snowstorm, and tornado). 22. Answer each yes-or-no question where relevant. 23. In each section, click the “Help” button at any time for information/assistance with that sec- tion as needed. 24. When you have completed the final incident response worksheet, click the “Use Control Form to Print Draft Plan” button at the end of the worksheet (Figure 12). 25. The title page will appear, and you can then select the “Generate Draft Plan” button. Note: If any Word documents are open, you will be prompted to save and close them. Microsoft Word must be closed prior to plan generation. Figure 12. Generating your TIRP. Figure 13. Generate draft plan button.

User’s Guide 85 26. You will be prompted to name and save your plan. Save the plan document where you choose (desktop for instance) and name as appropriate for your airport. Note: Our example is “My Airport TIRP.” WARNING: It is critical that each version of the plan that you save is saved with a unique name. If you attempt to name the plan as an exact or overwritten name of a previously generated plan, the tool will prompt you to create a new document. 27. It will take some time for the tool to generate the plan. After several minutes, you will receive a message that the plan template was created successfully. 28. Once the plan is generated, it is recommended that you save the Excel file you used to create the plan with a unique name so you can implement version control for future updates. 29. Once the plan template is created, you can open the plan document and modify it according to your specific situation (e.g., add pictures, terminal-specific information, annual updates, custodial changes, or a separate page for hyperlinks.). 30. The tool is a means to an end, the end being a TIRP in Microsoft Word that you can fur- ther edit, add graphics to, and customize to your airport using Word functions. Remember though, changes you make to the stand-alone word document do not get applied to the actual Excel-based tool itself! Frequently Asked Questions Q: What size airport is best suited to use the tool? A: The tool has been designed to serve any size or type of airport. In beta testing, it worked well for two large hubs, two medium hubs, a small hub, a non-hub primary, and a reliever airport. In general, more customization via editing the Microsoft Word version of the terminal incident response plan produced by the tool will be needed by larger airports. Figure 14. Saving your TIRP.

86 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Q: Does the tool produce a complete and fully functional terminal incident response plan? A: Yes and no. The tool will generate a NIMS-compliant complete plan for your airport; however, the plan produced should undergo a thorough airport review, training, and tabletop exercises prior to being considered fully functional. Q: In what format is the basic terminal incident response plan produced by the tool? A: It is a multi-chapter document in Microsoft Word (2010 or 2007). Q: How long will it take to create a terminal incident response plan from the tool? A: Depending on the complexity of the airport and how knowledgeable the staff member(s) preparing the plan are, it should take 30 minutes to 2 hours to use the tool and create the basic plan. Q: How long will it take to customize the basic plan to create the final, fully developed termi- nal incident response plan? A: For smaller airports, the basic plan produced by the tool can serve as is as the final termi- nal response plan. For larger airports, the customization process—editing the Word document version of the basic plan—should take 1 to 3 hours, depending on the extent of the changes and complexity of the site-specific information that the airport wishes to add. Q: How long is the process to build a terminal incident response plan? A: The best estimate for the development of a basic plan using the tool is 0.5 to 2.0 person- hours. The best estimate for the conversion (customization) of the basic plan to a fully devel- oped, final terminal incident response plan is 0 to 3.0 person-hours. Altogether, the process from start to finished final plan is estimated to take 0.5 to 5.0 person-hours. Q: Is there a need for specialized information technology (IT) folks to use the tool? A: Probably not, depending on the ability of the airport emergency manager, terminal man- ager, operations supervisor, or planner to use Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Word. Q: Can the tool be used by itself when an airport has an emergency for which it does not have a plan or has an outdated plan? A: The tool was not designed or intended to be used as a plan or as a substitute for a plan. However, in an emergency when an airport does not have an existing plan, the tool can quickly produce a plan including basic SOPs and checklists. Note, however, that plans should be devel- oped, trained, and exercised before being used in an actual emergency. Q: Would the tool and resulting terminal incident response plan be legally binding on an airport to the exclusion of other existing emergency preparedness documents or plans? A: No. The tool would provide structure and guidelines that may stand alone, supplement, or be used in concert with existing plans. Q: Does the plan produced by the tool contain any sensitive security information (SSI)? A: No, not unless the user inserts SSI text in one of the textboxes. If a user wants to be sure, the user should get the federal security director (FSD) and airport security coordinator (ASC) to review the plan. It is good practice to involve both the FSD and ASC as stakeholders in the development of terminal incident response plans. Q: Isn’t repopulation just a matter of reversing the evacuation or shelter in place? A: No, the sequence of actions and the responsibilities are different. For example, the termi- nal will have to have a structural, electrical, and mechanical evaluation before repopulation can

User’s Guide 87 begin. Furthermore, TSA and airport security will have to inspect and sanitize the secure por- tions of the terminal before any other employees or passengers can enter. Q: Do only airport employees have roles and responsibilities in a terminal incident response plan? A: Not usually. Using the tool’s inputs and the capabilities to edit the resulting Word docu- ment, the user can specify the roles and create action lists and checklists for any agency, airline, tenant, or mutual aid partner involved in terminal incident response. For this reason, these stakeholders should be involved in customizing and reviewing the plan. Q: How can the plan be customized to deal with site-specific details? A: There are three ways to customize the terminal incident plans produced by the tool: 1. By the data entered in the data blanks on data-entry pages of the tool, 2. By entering blocks of custom text in the textboxes while using the tool, and 3. By editing the resulting Word document. Q: Should the resulting terminal incident plan be incorporated directly into AEP? A: This is a choice that can usually be made by the airport. If the plan is incorporated directly into the AEP, any changes to the plan must be approved by the FAA compliance inspector. If the terminal incident response plan is not incorporated directly into the AEP, each pertinent part of it should be referenced within the plan. If in doubt, an airport should consult its FAA compliance inspector. Some airports have found it more practical or effective to have a separate terminal manual or a customer services manual. Q: If the terminal incident response plan produced by the tool is incorporated into the AEP, will it be fully compliant with FAA Advisory Circular 150/5200-31C? A: The plan developed by this tool is not required by Advisory Circular 150/5200-31C. The tool was designed on the assumption that the NIMS and ICS would be used in any response to any incident involving the terminal. The tool generates basic checklists and SOPs, but an airport may wish to edit the Word document to expand on them to fit site specifics. When in doubt about compliance with Advisory Circular 150/5200-31C, an airport should consult with its FAA compliance inspector. Q: What stakeholders should be involved in using the tool, customizing the Word document, and reviewing the resulting terminal incident response plan? A: Whether the terminal incident response plan is incorporated into the AEP or made a stand- alone plan, the same type of stakeholders suggested by FAA Advisory Circular 150/5200-31C should be involved. This includes units within the airport (senior management, terminal man- agers, emergency managers, operations managers, planners, ARFF, law enforcement, mainte- nance, and engineering). It also includes airlines, concessionaires, tenants, federal agencies, state agencies, and mutual aid partners. Q: Can the tool be used as a training aid? A: Yes. The whole package can be given to any stakeholder for training on terminal incident responses. Q: What is the relationship between a terminal incident response plan and an airport’s drill and exercise program? A: It is recommended that elements of the terminal incident response plan frequently be incorporated into tabletop exercises and even in full-scale functional exercises.

88 Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning Q: Will the tool run on a Mac computer? A: No. Q: Can the tool be used by iPads, smartphones, or tablets? A: It can be used on tablets and smartphones that have Microsoft Office applications. It cannot be used on iPads or iPhones. Q: Is there an app available? A: No, there is not an ACRP Terminal Incident Response Plan application available. Q: Why aren’t there Mac, iPad, iPhone, and apps available? A: The scope of the project only called for a tool to run on a PC, and the work plan and scope approved by the panel only called for a tool developed on Microsoft Excel. Q: Will the tool run on Office 2007 and Office 2010? A: Yes. The user’s manual and instructions imbedded in the tool allow the user to cope with differences between Excel 2007 and Excel 2010. Q: Is the tool’s Excel code open source? A: No. It is locked. Q: How was the tool tested prior to release? A: The tool was tested by the research team. Then it was tested by the ACRP project panel. Finally, it was beta tested at seven airports ranging from relievers to large hubs in size. A final test by the panel was completed before the tool was approved for release. After each test, adjustments were made to make the tool more user friendly. Q: Where did the information and models come from that the research team used to develop the tool? A: Thirty-six airports provided more than 100 documents, such as airport emergency plans, checklists, and SOPs, and these documents were analyzed using process mapping to determine the most common patterns of effective response. This information was combined with an exhaustive literature review of terminal incidents in the past 10 years. Q: Is any special training required prior to using the tool? A: No. The tool is very intuitive, and instructions are imbedded. Any moderately experienced airport emergency manager, operations supervisor, planner, or manager will be able to handle the inputs to the tool and customize the resulting Word document. Q: Does the tool assume any particular organizational structure at an airport? A: No. However, it does assume that the NIMS and ICS will be used as the basic organizational system for managing any response. Lessons Learned 1. Terminal incident response plans are better referenced by AEPs rather than incorporated directly into AEPs. Terminal incident response plans can be stand-alone documents or be incorporated into terminal management manuals or customer service manuals. Stand-alone documents will eliminate the need for FAA approval of all changes and edits, as is required for AEP changes.

User’s Guide 89 2. Good terminal incident response plans are important for customer service. 3. Good terminal incident response plans are essential to optimize the business continuity of airports. 4. Terminal incident response plans must allow frequent changes and updates. This is driven by terminal renovations and expansions, new tenants, new concessionaires, changed proce- dures, and changed federal regulations and guidelines for airport operations and security. 5. The best plans result when a broad range of stakeholders are involved in plan creation, review, and implementation. 6. Mutual aid partners should be involved in the development of terminal incident response plans and in training, drills, and exercises of the plans. 7. Tabletop exercises are an effective way to test terminal incident response plans and their elements. When the terminal incident response plan is significantly changed, the new plan should be trained and tested with a tabletop exercise or a partial full-scale functional exercise. 8. Detailed checklists, even down to the responsibilities and actions of individuals, are impor- tant, maybe essential. 9. The NIMS and ICS are the best ways to organize and manage responses to incidents in terminals. Plans, training, drills, and exercises should incorporate the NIMS and ICS. 10. The terminal incident response plan should be reviewed after any activation, drill, or exer- cise to incorporate improvements suggested by after-action reviews. 11. The terminal incident response plans should be trained annually for all persons having responsibilities under the plan, with extra training when new employees are added. 12. Early notification and continued effective communications are essential to managing ter- minal incidents. Airport-specific notification and communication procedures should be identified within the terminal incident response plan. User’s Guide Bibliography Excel 2010: Advanced student manual. (2011). Rochester, NY: Axzo Press. Garabedian, R. (2011). Microsoft Word 2010: A user’s manual for professors in the humanities. Amherst, MA: Uni- versity of Massachusetts. Retrieved from http://people.umass.edu/rgarabed/microsoftword2010manual. pdf. Loker, M. (2010). Excel 2007: Creating electronic spreadsheets. Oshkosh, WI: University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Retrieved from http://www.uwosh.edu/training/training-manuals/microsoft-office/excel-2007-manuals/ Excel2007CreatinganElectronicSpreadsheetManual.pdf/view. New York City Department of Education (NYC). (2011). Microsoft Office 2007 Word user guide. New York, NY: New York City. Retrieved from http://www.opt-osfns.org/dsf/reference/training_resources/msword/word/ ug/word_ug.pdf.

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S.DOT United States Department of Transportation

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 112: Airport Terminal Incident Response Planning summarizes the development and use of a tool that creates and maintains integrated incident response plans that address hazards in and around airport terminals.

The Airport Terminal Incident Response Plan (TIRP) tool, available on the CD-ROM that accompanies the report, assists in the development of a response plan to help mitigate the impact of events on terminal users. In addition to the TIRP tool, the report contains a user’s guide that provides a step-by-step process of generating incident response plans.

The report also contains an output example that demonstrates completed terminal incident response plans using the TIRP tool. The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

Download the .ISO CD-ROM Image

(Warning: This is a large file and may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

CD-ROM Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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