National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies (2020)

Chapter: Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples

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Page 388
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F - Agency Wallet Card Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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388 A P P E N D I X F Agency Wallet Card Examples Here are two examples of State DOT wallet cards with key contacts for the agency. To supplement the wallet card, these contacts can be programmed into the State Director’s office phone, cell phone, and satellite phone. EXAMPLE: Illinois Department of Transportation IN CASE OF EMERGENCY IDOT Employee Crisis Contact Information Emergency Preparedness for You and Your Family In case of a crisis involving IDOT facilities and the surrounding community, use the following information to stay updated on events: IDOT Hotline (toll free): 1-xxx-xxx-xxx IDOT Hotline (local): xxx-xxx-xxxx Report an event: xxx-xxx-xxxx Check IDOT status: www.idotdr.com Enter your Emergency Contact Information below. This information will assist Emergency Personnel and your family in the case of extreme situations involving DOT facilities and surrounding communities: Contact Phone Number

Agency Wallet Card Examples 389 1-PAGE (Double-Sided) AGENCY WALLET CARD EXAMPLE: Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FAST Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (2015) FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TDC Transit Development Corporation TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S. DOT United States Department of Transportation

TEMA, Comprehensive Exercise Program (CEP), Replaces TEMA CEP dated January, 31, 2006 Dated: 8 August, 2012 4 6) To comply with TEMA and Federal homeland security requirements and known emergency management best practices. 7) To exercise response operations and planning efforts according to contractual obligations. 8) To exercise emergency response operational plans for all PROBABLE and the more likely POSSIBLE hazards and threats to Tennessee. 9) To exercise the capabilities and legal guidelines to provide the service, assistance, coordination, and expertise to the citizens of Tennessee as described by the TEMP; and 10) To support to local jurisdictional training and exercise programs as best as is possible. B. Goal The goal of the CEP is to develop, implement and institutionalize a quality comprehensive, objective based and threat focused exercise program. The CEP provides policy, guidance, and standards for scheduling, uniformity in design, development, execution, and evaluation of emergency response exercises throughout TDOT. There is a great deal to be learned from well-planned and executed exercises. However, identifying, documenting and capturing the issues or items to be improved are the greatest benefit. The documenting process is not always just looking for items to be improved. It is not there to just find fault. The program also wants to identify items that worked well or successes so that they can also be maintained, shared and trained for future operations. The term “lessons learned” is a misnomer. Until it is identified and documented for improvement or defined as a success, it is yet to be determined that it has been “learned”. A more telling term is “lessons identified” or lessons “obtained”. It is a goal of this plan to convert lessons obtained into lesson learned by providing feedback into the emergency management training and operational communities that will truly improve and sustain emergency preparedness within TDOT. These exercise-identified lessons are the basis for improvement in emergency preparedness plans, training, organizations and resource requirements. In order to achieve its goal the TDOT Comprehensive Exercise Program will: • Establish relationships with members of State, local and Federal government emergency management communities as well as volunteer agencies and private industry in the design, development, conduct, and evaluation of exercises. • Build on existing relationships across the State through the regional TDOT staff. • Emphasize joint State and local exercises, with the support of State and Federal partners, addressing effective evaluation and identification of corrective actions or improvement planning. • Provide flexibility for incorporating TDOT priorities, goals and objectives via needs assessments into each exercise. • Consolidate exercise objectives and requirements so that individual exercises provide the opportunity to fulfill requirements in multiple program areas to achieve greater overall efficiency. • Provide for the design of exercises that are shorter in duration and focus on the need to exercise particular emergency preparedness functions. • Provide support for local agency emergency management exercise programs. C. Scope This comprehensive exercise plan (CEP) addresses the specific threats and hazards known to the State of Tennessee allowing for focused emergency preparedness exercise planning. These functions include: infrastructure items supporting transportation; and systems or organizations including warning; communications; engineering; evacuation; emergency welfare

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State transportation agencies will always fulfill a role in the emergency-management effort - for all incidents, from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events. State agency plans and procedures are expected (indeed required if the agency seeks federal compensation) to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This involves multi-agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Research Report 931: A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies is an update to a 2010 guide that provided an approach to all‐hazards emergency management and documented existing practices in emergency-response planning.

Significant advances in emergency management, changing operational roles at State DOTs and other transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010, have resulted in a need to reexamine requirements for state transportation agency emergency-management functions, roles, and responsibilities.

The report is accompanied by NCHRP Web-Only Document 267:Developing a Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies and a PowerPoint presentation that offers an overview and key findings, among other information.

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