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Suggested Citation:"Preface." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Page 8
Page 9
Suggested Citation:"Preface." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25557.
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Page 9

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8  Preface  A GUIDE TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT STATE TRANSPORTATION AGENCIES, was developed for use by state  transportation agencies as they plan and develop their organizational functions, roles, and responsibilities  for  emergency management within  the  all‐hazards  context  of  the  National  Incident Management  System  (NIMS).  It  is  an  update  to  NCHRP Report 525, Volume 16: A Guide  to  Emergency  Response  Planning  at  State  Transportation  Agencies, which  provided  an  approach  to  all‐hazards  emergency management  and  documented existing practices in emergency response planning.   Similar  to  the  2010  Guide,  this  Guide  is  designed  to  support  executive  management  and  emergency  response  planners  as  they  assess  their  emergency  management  programs  and  identify  areas  needing  improvement.  The  Guide  will  help  state  transportation  agency  program  level  managers  and  their  counterparts at other levels of government plan, organize, staff, train, exercise, manage, implement, and  fund preparations to carry out their emergency management responsibilities. These include the primary  and supporting agencies  identified  in each state’s Emergency Operations Plan  (EOP) under Emergency  Support Function ESF#1–Transportation. These responsibilities include all transportation modes that are  under state control or influence and those functions agencies perform to support multi‐state, state, and  local emergencies.  Significant  advances  in  emergency  management,  changing  operational  roles  at  State  DOTs  and  other  transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010 have resulted in a need to re‐ examine  requirements  for  state  transportation  agency  emergency  management  functions,  roles  and  responsibilities.  The  2019 Guide  incorporates  current  practices  and  guidance  in  emergency  management,  recognizing these advances and changing roles and guidance.   This Guide  expands  the  focus  from  emergency  response  to  all  aspects  of  emergency  management  and  reflects  the  evolving  threats  and  hazards  to  transportation  networks  and  systems.  It also addresses  emergency  management  in  the  broader  context  of  community, regional, and national  resilience and sustainability.    Similar to the previous edition, this Guide is  • NIMS‐compliant, as it fully embraces the incident command, joint planning, standardization, and performance‐based improvements in incident/emergency management (NIMS refresh, 2017). • All‐hazards oriented, which considers  the  full  range of hazards and  threats  from minor  traffic incidents to catastrophic events. It applies to all transportation agencies, at the state, local, tribal, and territorial levels, and to interregional coalitions. • Multimodal,  including all modes and  sectors  that use  the highway  system,  including personal travel, transit, and commercial vehicle transport. • Oriented to the safe and efficient management of  incidents, for the safety of responders and victims alike, for preserving public and private  infrastructure and socioeconomic activities, and for rapid restoration to normalcy. The 2019 Guide is a light update to the 2010 Guide, and is not a major rewrite of the original. The update has consolidated the extensive material contained in both the 2010 Guide and the supplemental web only material and consolidated it into a more concise Guide with Appendices.

9  Consistent  with  the  2010  Guide,  this  Guide  explores  how  transportation  fits  into  the  traditional  emergency  management  community  and  what  transportation  offers.  It  is  important  to  understand  that a  state  transportation agency will always  fulfill a  role  in  the emergency management  effort for all incidents from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events.   State  agency  plans  and  procedures  are  expected  (indeed  required  if  the  agency  seeks  federal  compensation)  to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This  involves multi‐ agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.  The  Guide  provides  the  legal/institutional  perspective  because  it  is  imperative  that  a  transportation  agency understand what it must—or should—do and assess its capability to do it.   Similar  to  the  2010 Guide,  the  2019 Guide  does  not  directly  address  aviation, marine,  heavy  rail,  or  pipeline  modes,  although  these  modes  and  the  threats  against  them  can  impact  transportation  infrastructure  and  operations.  These  modes  should  be  considered,  as  appropriate,  in  the  emergency  management process (e.g., aviation and marine have a place in emergency evacuations).  Finally, as the 2010 Guide put it so well—this is a guide, not a standard.  

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State transportation agencies will always fulfill a role in the emergency-management effort - for all incidents, from the routine traffic incident through major emergencies to catastrophic events. State agency plans and procedures are expected (indeed required if the agency seeks federal compensation) to be related to state and regional emergency structures and plans. This involves multi-agency, multi‐jurisdictional cooperation in emergency planning and operations.

This pre-publication draft, NCHRP Research Report 931: A Guide to Emergency Management at State Transportation Agencies, is an update to a 2010 guide that provided an approach to all‐hazards emergency management and documented existing practices in emergency-response planning.

Significant advances in emergency management, changing operational roles at State DOTs and other transportation organizations, along with federal guidance issued since 2010, have resulted in a need to reexamine requirements for state transportation agency emergency-management functions, roles, and responsibilities.

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